What have you been printing.

Rhinochugger

Rhinochugger

Retired Oik
27 Oct 2009
28,252
North West Norfolk
Yup! The easiest option as he also included a rig to hold the motor, battery and switch in the right position.


I'm just working on a Plan B - if that doesn't do the job then I might take you up on the offer...:)

Rik
I suppose another option, but would require a bit more work, would be one of those Tamiya model gearboxes - the one I bought came with four optional ratios, and you get a steel axle which would work the same way as driving off the motor shaft. It would take a bit of work, though :whew::whew:
 
mike

mike

Master at annoying..
Staff member
GSC Moderator
24 Oct 2009
50,189
Rossendale
www.gscalecentral.net
Working on the surport structure, work in progress. IMG_20200826_124051.jpg IMG_20200827_134455.jpg
 
ge_rik

ge_rik

British narrow gauge (esp. Southwold and W&LLR)
I suppose another option, but would require a bit more work, would be one of those Tamiya model gearboxes - the one I bought came with four optional ratios, and you get a steel axle which would work the same way as driving off the motor shaft. It would take a bit of work, though :whew::whew:
I actually looked at that option. I have a Tamiya gearbox, but I couldn't work out how to tap into the final drive shaft and I've long since lost the instructions.

Plan B was to draw and print a pulley wheel to fit on the end of the shaft of one of those tiny gearbox motors which were on eBay a couple of years ago (might still be there). I bought three "just in case!". However, after a few abortive attempts to get it working, I gave up. Either the belt was too tight and there was too much friction on the beam engine shaft, or it was too slack and there wasn't enough friction for the belt to bite on the pulley wheels.

Plan C has been much more successful. I drew and 3d printed a cradle for the mini geared motor to allow it to sit inside the original motor clip. At first I had the motor shaft bearing directly on the outside of the flywheel as per the original arrangement. However, the was far to slow. So I dug out the wheel off a cheap toy from my bits box and forced it on to the end of the motor shaft. I've had to move the mounting for the motor, but it now rotates at a much more realistic speed.

I'm just painting the beam engine, so once that's done, I'll take another video so you can see it in action.

Rik
 
ge_rik

ge_rik

British narrow gauge (esp. Southwold and W&LLR)
For some reason, I didn't hit the "Reply" button on the above post at the time, so it's now a bit delayed. I've now tweaked, soldered, painted and filmed.

The ex-toy-car wheel acting as a friction drive is a bit too apparent but I can hide that behind a strategically placed barrel or even an engineman figure. I think the speed is now about right - and the PWM controller allows me to fine tune that.

Rik
 
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ge_rik

ge_rik

British narrow gauge (esp. Southwold and W&LLR)
Now blogged the beam engine build for anyone who might be interested

Rik
 
ge_rik

ge_rik

British narrow gauge (esp. Southwold and W&LLR)
My efforts are nowhere up the the quality and standard of Mike et al - maybe because my printer cost only £80 - or maybe because I'm not so skilled at setting up up properly. Prints which are mostly along the X and Y axis are acceptable
IMG_1085.JPG

So these ends and sides of my luggage van have turned out quite well. I've added a bit of detail with plasticard
IMG_1088.JPG

And mounted everything on my ubiquitous HLW chassis
IMG_1094.JPG

Almost finished ...
IMG_1100.JPG

Whereas these ridge tiles for the boneworks building were printed upright and so mostly along the Z axis and are heavily ribbed
IMG_1087.JPG

I think it's because the frame of my printer is made from 4mm ply and so, even though I've added extra framework to try and stabilise it, it still flexes a fair bit.

However, once installed, the ridge tiles seem to look OK
IMG_1106.JPG



Rik
 
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Tanker man

Tanker man

G scale and 5 inch ride on
10 Jun 2015
404
Oxford
IMG_1468.JPG
Well this is my offering, still learning a lot, my wife said she would like a rabbit printed, yesterday, first attempt came out 10mm tall! ...........so now I know how to re size in 'Cura' also, the railing, in the picture, would not print until I turned it round and laid it flat as it had been saved in the upright position
Dave
 
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PhilP

PhilP

G Scale, 7/8th's, Electronics
5 Jun 2013
26,587
Tamworth, Staffs.
So tempted to make a comment... ;):lipssealed: - Where's David, when you need him? :think:
 
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ge_rik

ge_rik

British narrow gauge (esp. Southwold and W&LLR)
I've now finished titivating and painting the van.
IMG_1122.JPG

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As you can see, it's quite a small model - I don't think the CDR luggage vans were quite this small, but I wanted it to look right proportionally.
IMG_1123.JPG

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The 3D prints were 'bare-bones' so I added the detailing later using plasticard (see above).
IMG_1124.JPG

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I'm quite pleased with how it turned out.

Rik
 
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ge_rik

ge_rik

British narrow gauge (esp. Southwold and W&LLR)
I decided to tinker with the drawings and have now added the extra detailing as part of the print.
IMG_1128.JPG

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I've not done any tidying - this is how it has come off the printer.
IMG_1129.JPG

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I've now printed sufficient parts to make another van.
IMG_1127.JPG

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From my experience, curved roofs are a bit of a struggle for 3D printers. On the original model I used strips of 1.5mm plasticard as planks covered with a 0.5mm layer of plasticard. I opted for interlocking planks for version 2 of the van.
IMG_1135.JPG

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They could be covered with plasticard, paper or fabric. I'll decided when I get to it.

Rik
 
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ge_rik

ge_rik

British narrow gauge (esp. Southwold and W&LLR)
And, of course, my source of ready to roll chassis has dried-up - ie the Hartland Loco Works mini series.

So, I decided to design my own version based on the dimensions of the HLW chassis.
IMG_1130.JPG

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However, I've never been happy with the HLW solebars, so I redesigned them to look more UK-based.
IMG_1131.JPG

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The can be fitted with Bachmann metal wheels as with the HLW wagons
IMG_1140.JPG

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Either the usual 32mm wheels
IMG_1138.JPG

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Or the smaller 24mm (?) wheels
IMG_1136.JPG

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The smaller wheels looked better on the luggage van BTW

Rik
 
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Rhinochugger

Rhinochugger

Retired Oik
27 Oct 2009
28,252
North West Norfolk
I've now finished titivating and painting the van.
IMG_1122.JPG

.
As you can see, it's quite a small model - I don't think the CDR luggage vans were quite this small, but I wanted it to look right proportionally.
IMG_1123.JPG

.
The 3D prints were 'bare-bones' so I added the detailing later using plasticard (see above).
IMG_1124.JPG

.
I'm quite pleased with how it turned out.

Rik
That railbus is very similar to the Clogher Valley one - very nice
 
Zerogee

Zerogee

Clencher's Bogleman
25 Oct 2009
17,071
North Essex
So tempted to make a comment... ;):lipssealed: - Where's David, when you need him? :think:
I think I was tempted to make the same comment, Phil - it took a lot of willpower not to.... :D :D :D

Jon.
 
Tanker man

Tanker man

G scale and 5 inch ride on
10 Jun 2015
404
Oxford
IMG_1471.JPG
Ok , next print, as you can see, a picnic bench, this is from 'thingiverse' it is in 00 scale but dimensions changed to suit G scale. The only problem was that the first few lines across the seats and table top, sagged, but once several passes were made, it all looked good from the top. What I have found is that, to slide a 15 watt soldering iron over the loose strands, melts the filament back to shape, looks a bit untidy underneath but looks good from the top, which is where it will be viewed from.
Dave
Ps. I will ignore the comments about my wife's rabbit!!!
 
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ge_rik

ge_rik

British narrow gauge (esp. Southwold and W&LLR)
That railbus is very similar to the Clogher Valley one - very nice
They were one and the same - the County Donegal bought it from the CVR when they started investigating the feasibility of I/c power. I particularly liked this bus - partly because it was the smallest of the articulated railbuses and so I thought it would cope with my sharp curves and also because I really like the half cab.

Rik