To crimp or solder

Shunter46

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I am wiring up my new DC garden G gauge. What’s best to crimp or solder confections ? Any advice please and what tools are best ?
 

Rhinochugger

Retired Oik
27 Oct 2009
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North West Norfolk
I am wiring up my new DC garden G gauge. What’s best to crimp or solder confections ? Any advice please and what tools are best ?
Solder, every time - but, if you want to use crimp connectors for ease of disconnection, then use a bit of solder in the collar of the crimped connector.
 

PhilP

G Scale, 7/8th's, Electronics
5 Jun 2013
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Tamworth, Staffs.
If you have the correct tooling, then you can crimp.. Otherwise you will not get a 'gas-tight' connection, and you will have problems over time..

I solder, but if I had the tools, I would probably twist, tin/solder the wire, then crimp it!

PhilP.
 

dutchelm

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24 Oct 2009
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N Somerset
A lot of my joints are crimped , but all done with a proper ratchet crimper. It won't let go until it is done solid. Never had a problem.
 

Greg Elmassian

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Realize crimping on stranded wire still is not "gas tight" since the individual strands still have some air space between them.

crimp, then solder.... mechanical connection before electrical connection.

greg
 
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Shunter46

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A lot of my joints are crimped , but all done with a proper ratchet crimper. It won't let go until it is done solid. Never had a problem.
Just order a good quality ratchet crimper, arriving tomorrow. So I will try both as suggested on this forum.
 

Gizzy

A gentleman, a scholar, and a railway modeller....
26 Oct 2009
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Prefer to solder, but belts and braces as Greg says is the way to go....
 

JimmyB

Semi-Retired; more time for trains.
On the railway I solder, but for my locos I crimp, again I bought a reasonable crimping tool, however the best qulity tools cost over £400.00 :(
 

Paul M

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Realize crimping on stranded wire still is not "gas tight" since the individual strands still have some air space between them.

crimp, then solder.... mechanical connection before electrical connection.

greg
Yes crimping solid cores isnt the best of things to do, so crimp then solder.
 

brownmat

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A lot of my joints are crimped , but all done with a proper ratchet crimper. It won't let go until it is done solid. Never had a problem.
May I ask what brand of crimper and crimps/ferrules you would reccomend?
 

Rhinochugger

Retired Oik
27 Oct 2009
28,770
3,459
North West Norfolk
I am wiring up my new DC garden G gauge. What’s best to crimp or solder confections ? Any advice please and what tools are best ?

Solder, every time - but, if you want to use crimp connectors for ease of disconnection, then use a bit of solder in the collar of the crimped connector.
Having said that, some crimped connectors have the coloured heat protective shroud all the way over the spade, while some only have it over the collar. Over the collar is best if you are going to solder the wire once crimped. Like this

1605883281606.png

There are some delightful pitfalls with crimped connectors as I have found out. While it is fairly common knowledge that the three colours relate to the size of wire that is to be used, when using spade connectors, there are in fact three widths of connector :eek: While the width is of little technical interest for the sort of current we're using, you need to make sure that the male and female are the same width :oops::oops:
 

Hutch

G Gauge, Raising Peaches, Apricots
1 Feb 2012
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Having said that, some crimped connectors have the coloured heat protective shroud all the way over the spade, while some only have it over the collar. Over the collar is best if you are going to solder the wire once crimped. Like this

View attachment 276439

There are some delightful pitfalls with crimped connectors as I have found out. While it is fairly common knowledge that the three colours relate to the size of wire that is to be used, when using spade connectors, there are in fact three widths of connector :eek: While the width is of little technical interest for the sort of current we're using, you need to make sure that the male and female are the same width :oops::oops:
There was a former United States based Train Vendor that "over crimped" the connecters. This would cause the wire to open up inside the insulation collar. Although securely attached by the collar, no electricity could get through. Often referred to as the "non conductive mid air splice".
---Hutch
 

Rhinochugger

Retired Oik
27 Oct 2009
28,770
3,459
North West Norfolk
There was a former United States based Train Vendor that "over crimped" the connecters. This would cause the wire to open up inside the insulation collar. Although securely attached by the collar, no electricity could get through. Often referred to as the "non conductive mid air splice".
---Hutch
Yeah, I was a bit concerned by the talk of ratchet crimping tools - I only have a simple had crimp tool and that's adequate :nod: :nod:
 
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Greg Elmassian

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I'm not familiar with what is available over there, but here we have connectors with the same type of "crimp area".

The business end can be open, closed (ring), or a male or female "spade" (in 3 different sizes), bullet, and splice are the ones I can think of off the top of my head (and I have here)

In the use, there are usually 3 basic sizes for wire gauge, color coded to red, blue, yellow (small to large wire gauge)


The crimp I use basically punctures the center (not on the split side) and compresses it.

The cheap crimpers just smash these into an oval, very poor, the wires will slip out.

There is a specific tool with a "finger" that adds pressure to the crimp, but more importantly "locks" wires from pulling out.... see the "indent here"
 
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Paul M

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May I ask what brand of crimper and crimps/ferrules you would reccomend?
The ones I have used at work for many years now (and TBH really need to be renewed) are from RS Components.
One small tip, don't pinch some skin whilst using ratchet crimped, I wont need to tell you how I know, but the resulting blood and pain just isn't worth it
 

brownmat

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The ones I have used at work for many years now (and TBH really need to be renewed) are from RS Components.
One small tip, don't pinch some skin whilst using ratchet crimped, I wont need to tell you how I know, but the resulting blood and pain just isn't worth it
Thank you. I've got a draper rachet, but the crimps I've got just don't hold the wires! Was there a specific brand at rs you used?
 

Greg Elmassian

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  • RS Stock No. 136-7425 is ok but not great...
I searched the site, and did not find anything better for that type of terminal, in my experience, even though it is one of the recommend crimpers on that site for that type of terminal. I know so many people that have the issue of wires coming out, but the crimps I make with the tool you see are tops. Last for years.

In looking at Amazon UK, I see the Draper 35574, and that one will definitely let wires pull out. The draper 67652 is really poor, that is the type I see over here, and it is never good on insulated terminals.

The problem is made worse with insulated terminals, all you do is tear up and move the insulation, with poor crimping on the metal part.

Try this one:


And use the "bare" part on the insulated unit, then the insulated part to re-form the insulation as needed.

Greg
 

Greg Elmassian

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I put up a page on crimping, showing how the crimper makes a positive lock on the wires:


Greg