The CBR Line is Born..

LGB-Sid

LGB-Sid

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No acetone, just sandpaper, I do tend to orientate the parts I print so the lines generated lay in the directions I want them, so the wagons above the sides were printed standing vertical, so the lines represent wood grain so no real sanding needed then on a lot of wooded bits :)
 
FurkaSOCal

FurkaSOCal

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Okay so it seems like its basically a type of auto body spray paint, Rust-Oleum might be a similar product I'll try that's available in America.
 
LGB-Sid

LGB-Sid

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Hi yes The "Halfords" reference is a store name here :) the paints are basically Auto body spray paints.
 
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LGB-Sid

LGB-Sid

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Next Wagon To print / Make is a Midlands Railways Covered Goods Wagon.

wagon.jpg


3D Model built and ready to test Print, Ignore the wheel they are only for Reference as the wagon won't have printed wheels, I can't print metal :( It,s a a bit shorter than the original drawing, to suit my printer max length. so no longer a 12 tonne wagon :) so the V bracing on the sides I removed as they looked squashed.

wagon covered.jpg



Ends Printed and assembled and painted .

covered01.jpg
 
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LGB-Sid

LGB-Sid

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Bit more Printed now it rolls on it's own chassis, the doors are going to slide when and if I work out how i'm going to do it :)

covered02.jpg
 
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LGB-Sid

LGB-Sid

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Another week gone buy, but did a bit more , can't believe I printed the roof only took 6 hours :) but not got any 2 mm plastic card and delivery's seem to take forever at the moment, also got the top door runners printed and fitted and the axle boxes, just need to decide if it should have a white roof or not ?, Resin printing next for all the Black iron bits.

covered04.jpg
 
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LGB-Sid

LGB-Sid

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First Van just about finished

covered07.jpg


Test Run , double buffer finished, most of the 3D printed Iron work fitted, just door lock and handles to go and some lettering , I did print the locks and handles but a bit to fiddly to put together think I will have to make them over scale a bit :)

covered08.jpg



I got carried away the doors do open not sure why I will never put anything in there I bet :)

covered09.jpg


Think we have a derailment of the Boxer class :)

derail.jpg
 
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LGB-Sid

LGB-Sid

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Stainz conversion time, to something that looks British (ish) this one was a 2020 version and is being designed to convert it into a Hunslet looking loco using unmodified original stainz parts where they suit the look and function. I have two 2012s so one day will re-design this so it fits them and convert them, decided this would be a good test before building a GWR type 13** which I have started drawing up.


Hunt2.jpg


Early days the white foam board will be a printed part once I know where I want holes etc in it. The lower motor block support case tested that it fits over the stanz block and supports all the original running gear and pickup skates, One or two small tweaks needed then I can print it again in the final material

hunt4.jpg
 
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LGB-Sid

LGB-Sid

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After a few hours redesign and a pair of sharp cutters on the printed motor / gearbox support case, I managed to get the whole thing sitting another 3mm lower on the Stainz motor Block so that bit is nearly ready to print. Cab printed , down to one printer today broke the feed wheel on one of them, only £6 to mend it but bet it takes all week to get here :(
and you are quite right the standard front loop is not long enough I need to print a longer one so a LGB hook will hook on to it.

Hunt3.jpg
 
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dunnyrail

dunnyrail

DOGS, Garden Railways, Steam Trains, Jive Dancing,
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I was at one time thinking that this 3D printing was a bif of a faff, but what you are doing shows that it can be very worthwhile.
 
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David1226

David1226

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I will probably make myself unpopular here. Being a bit of a Luddite, I have yet to be convinced that 3D printing is 'proper' modelling. Having spent a lifetime of making card mock-ups to check size/fit then cutting, filing, scraping various thicknesses of Plasticard to shape various parts I do not see having a computer and 3D printer do it all for you as somehow quite legitimate. I felt the same when digital cameras took over from film, but of course now I would never go back. While the above is a fine model conversion, I do not see anything that could not be made just as easily from plastic sheet material. I do not wish to pour cold water on anyone's efforts, any activity that produces a unique model is all to the good but I see 3D printing as somehow diminishing and undervaluing traditional modelling skills. I guess it's probably an age thing, but it makes me feel like a bit of a dinosaur. Just to fight my corner, I post a pic of my freelance O-16.5 scale Crocodile made many, many years ago (the photo was taken using 35mm film). Apart from the bits that are obviously metal, every thing else was made from plastic sheet, with patience, dedication and an enormous sense of achievement. Sorry to appear so negative (that's not another film reference).

.Neg 35 - 02.jpg


David
 
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LGB-Sid

LGB-Sid

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If it's felt my efforts on modeling are not up to the required standards I can simply stop posting pictures , There is a lot of skill in drawing up models and actually getting them to print the way you want them, I don't download things I produce all the files myself, but there again I am Old as well, so I dont see the point playing with cardboard when I can achieve the results I want with modern materials and technology.
 
musket the dog

musket the dog

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I will probably make myself unpopular here. Being a bit of a Luddite, I have yet to be convinced that 3D printing is 'proper' modelling. Having spent a lifetime of making card mock-ups to check size/fit then cutting, filing, scraping various thicknesses of Plasticard to shape various parts I do not see having a computer and 3D printer do it all for you as somehow quite legitimate....

David
I think the key component is time, whatever your manufacturing technique, what makes a model something wondrous to behold is that the great ones reflect the time and effort that has been put into it by the creator.

The manufacturing process may be simplified but the time has to be made up in the design and planning stage. My railway CAD models don't have that much detail in them but I bet the basic mock up for my Beyer build probably used somewhere between 15 - 20 hours of design work. The benefit is I build all the plasticard parts once. It's my modern version of the cardboard mock up if you will. You only need to look at Sid's CAD model for his GWR tank in the build contest thread or his wagons to see how much detail can begin to be put in, then we're talking dozens of hours of modelling. Something as detailed as an LGB loco is probably hundreds if not thousands.

Additionally I would add it's just another skill one has to practice like any art. Your creations David, have been an ongoing source of inspiration for me but I wouldn't expect to pick up a fresh piece of plasticard and produce anything like it on my first go. I wouldn't expect there are many people in here who could open up a copy of Creo or Solidworks and create an accurate representation of something on their first go either.

To put things in perspective, my last big project at work was designing the front end bodywork and radiator/oil cooler cowling for the new Triumph Rocket. I think if I were to add it all up it would total something over 2500 hours of CAD work. The various injection moulding and HPDC machines that make it can probably knock the whole lot out in under 30 seconds :think:

Just to round off, I hope both of you keep posting photos of your efforts. Both are inspiring to me in different ways.
 
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David1226

David1226

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If it's felt my efforts on modeling are not up to the required standards I can simply stop posting pictures , There is a lot of skill in drawing up models and actually getting them to print the way you want them, I don't download things I produce all the files myself, but there again I am Old as well, so I dont see the point playing with cardboard when I can achieve the results I want with modern materials and technology.
Methinks you do protest too much. I've already said that I am a Luddite and a dinosaur, I do not understand. nor am I prepared to learn the technology involved. The point is I have the suspicion that technology is taking over and leaving traditional modellers in its wake. I marvel at the skills of model engineers who with lathes, milling machines and pillar drills turn out perfect metal models in miniature, something I could never aspire to. There is room for all skill levels in any hobby, otherwise no hobby could hope to survive, but I baulk at the idea of the machines taking over.

David
 
musket the dog

musket the dog

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Maybe questioning the legitimacy of someone's time and effort because you don't have the patience or willingness to understand (not learn) a new method set the wrong tone? However I can understand how the particular technique would not be satisfying for everyone.

I think maybe you're overthinking the issue.

The elite that can scratch build in brass probably had the same worries when the first cheap plastic kits arrived in the market and that skill set hasn't yet died out. There's a lot of kick back in 009 circles now that ready-to-run stuff has started to appear. People are still producing and assembling new kits. Not every young up-and-coming modeler (or the older ones) has training or experience of CAD software. For the large part decent programs are very expensive or you have to jump through hoops to get hold of them. Not everyone has the patience or the technical sympathy to set-up printers properly. Having someone else do it is very expensive.

New techniques come along and the hobby diversifies. The pioneers 100 years ago certainly didn't have access to mass-produced, ready-to-run locos and wagons to cut and shut. I don't imagine they had Plasticard either thinking about it.

Maybe it comes from a lack of explanation from those of us that can use CAD? I'm certainly guilty of showing one or two screenshots of a CAD model, and then launching into a step-by-step guide on how to build it in reality. When I've got a working CAD PC again I might do a time lapse video of modelling something basic like a ToyTrain wagon, so that the uninitiated could have a peak into exactly how it comes together if they so choose.
 
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dunnyrail

dunnyrail

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If it's felt my efforts on modeling are not up to the required standards I can simply stop posting pictures , There is a lot of skill in drawing up models and actually getting them to print the way you want them, I don't download things I produce all the files myself, but there again I am Old as well, so I dont see the point playing with cardboard when I can achieve the results I want with modern materials and technology.
I think as time goes by new skills appear, look at what I have been building out of cardboard, pure 50’s tech that would not even be thought about when that ‘new evil medium‘ appeared called Plasticard in the 60’s. Some of the writings and mutterings at the time about the good old boy (George Slater?) that used to demonstrate it at shows were not always for polite company. Of course by then Wood (Obechi) for Coaches, Wagons any Metal for Locomotives Tended to be what the so called ‘experts’ were using predominantly. Once I got what plasticard was all about I became a convert and still use it extensively to this day, though it is nice to have a change.

Things move on and though I doubt that I will ever get into 3d Cad and Printing I do accept that there are many (different) skills in using them, but each to his own I guess. But Sid please DO NOT stop inspiring us with your superb efforts.

Last word, enjoy what you make however and whatever you make it with.
 
P

Paul M

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I think rule 8 must apply here. But as Jon says, things evolve, change and become normal. I mean look at DCC and DC, battery, radio control compared to clockwork!
So please everyone don't stop posting your modelling in whatever materials you use, they're always inspiring
 
LGB-Sid

LGB-Sid

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No info just a pic of what the replicator nearly finished, it probably spent to much time making Earl Grey Hot, No cereal packets or plastic sheets were harmed in anyway in making this, one pencil did get snapped in half I forgot it was in my pocked.


edward12.jpg



edward11.jpg
 
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PhilP

PhilP

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Are the rivets printed as well? - A really cruel close-up, but an impressive finish to a 3D print.