Progress on The Orchard Line - posts in. Next up, cable trays!

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Greg Elmassian

Greg Elmassian

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8 Mar 2014
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I'd take this opportunity to put some sealer in the ends of the 4x4 posts, on cool evenings, moisture could condense on the inside of the metal boot.

Cheap insurance, and will be too much of a pain to do later.

Greg
 
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Rhinochugger

Rhinochugger

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27 Oct 2009
28,233
North West Norfolk
I'd take this opportunity to put some sealer in the ends of the 4x4 posts, on cool evenings, moisture could condense on the inside of the metal boot.

Cheap insurance, and will be too much of a pain to do later.

Greg
Yes, even though the timber is treated, I forget the statistic ( I ought to have known it at one time) but timber absorbs a zillion times more moisture through end grain than side grain :nerd::nerd:
 
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DGE-Railroad

DGE-Railroad

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I'd take this opportunity to put some sealer in the ends of the 4x4 posts, on cool evenings, moisture could condense on the inside of the metal boot.

Cheap insurance, and will be too much of a pain to do later.

Greg
Thanks for the suggestion Greg. I have indeed done so; my thinking being exactly as you suggested :)

I appreciate the advice - as you say, a cheap and easy step to take at this stage in order to avoid a lot of upheaval and disruption later on!
 
Dash9

Dash9

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So CAT-herine and Genny-fer were unable to detect the pipe. Predictable I suppose - it's probably plastic, or plastic sheathed. I followed it down into the ground for about a foot before giving up the excavation idea.

I'm just going to follow GAPs suggestion and dig out some small pad footings, line them with hardcore and make a little concrete pad for the post boots to bolt to.

The boots themselves inverted, look pretty good to make a snug and broad mounting point for the tops of the posts. That little strip of wood balanced on the top is 450mm wide, which is the cable tray width I'm now planning to go with

View attachment 272903
If digging around Electrical, Gas or anything buried, try to find someone with a Hydro excavator. Never any damage.
 
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DGE-Railroad

DGE-Railroad

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footings dug man-draulically - being small, they didn't take long at all. All 6 now filled with a small layer of hardcore ready for the concrete next week.

Makes a change from the 45 tons of concrete I've just laid for a new shed. I can mix this lot by hand and won't be ferrying it around in a dumper! :D
 
DGE-Railroad

DGE-Railroad

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The test cable trays have turned up, so I've trialled mounting them. They're heavy-duty versions - I'm hoping the longer sides will add some stiffness to the spans.

If anyone has a tried-and-tested approach to forming gentle bends with cable tray, I'd be keen to hear them. Logic seems to dictate either sectioning the tray completely and bolting it together to form a curve, or to cut all the way to the side panel using that to help form the outside edge of the bend. The trays themselves don't actually have to be too conformant because the board on top will be creating the final shape. It'd seem to make sense though to try to have the cable tray follow the bend as much as possible to keep the board centered on it.

I've popped a piece of Hardiebacker cement board on top to get a feel for how it will look I've been experimenting with different cutting methods for the boards. I'm wary of the score-and-snap approach on a 1.2m board - any that go wrong would waste the board. I'm probably going to go the circular saw route to cut each board down the centre to get two 1.2m strips from each. I'll jigsaw the bends but only after the track is down.

The plan is to SBR some lightweight gravel along with the track, to the Hardiebacker

The section in the photos is the highest part of the layout; a height of about 4ft

20200924_190602.jpg
20200924_190645.jpg
 
P

Paul M

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25 Oct 2016
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Royston
If you don't mind the cost, you can buy curved sections of cable tray. Whether you can get the right radii or not I'm not sure
 
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GAP

GAP

G Scale Trains, HO Trains
The test cable trays have turned up, so I've trialled mounting them. They're heavy-duty versions - I'm hoping the longer sides will add some stiffness to the spans.

If anyone has a tried-and-tested approach to forming gentle bends with cable tray, I'd be keen to hear them. Logic seems to dictate either sectioning the tray completely and bolting it together to form a curve, or to cut all the way to the side panel using that to help form the outside edge of the bend. The trays themselves don't actually have to be too conformant because the board on top will be creating the final shape. It'd seem to make sense though to try to have the cable tray follow the bend as much as possible to keep the board centered on it.

I've popped a piece of Hardiebacker cement board on top to get a feel for how it will look I've been experimenting with different cutting methods for the boards. I'm wary of the score-and-snap approach on a 1.2m board - any that go wrong would waste the board. I'm probably going to go the circular saw route to cut each board down the centre to get two 1.2m strips from each. I'll jigsaw the bends but only after the track is down.

The plan is to SBR some lightweight gravel along with the track, to the Hardiebacker

The section in the photos is the highest part of the layout; a height of about 4ft

View attachment 273727
View attachment 273728

Personally I would section the tray completely and bolt it together to form a curve.

Or you could use something like this The garden layout extension begins !
It is C section steel house framing.

As for cutting the fibre cement I use an angle grinder with a metal cutting blade to cut through mine for long lengths and score with the grinder and snap for short lengths.
 
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DGE-Railroad

DGE-Railroad

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Thanks for the pointer re: curved cable tray Paul. I had noticed these but they seem to be smaller prescribed radii and mainly through 90 degrees.
 
DGE-Railroad

DGE-Railroad

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Cheers GAP, yes I think the sectioning completely is probably the easiest approach.

I particularly like that U channel ladder section idea though. I'm going to look at the availability and compare costs with the cable tray and will consider that for the rest of the layout - if it's comparable it'd be easier to work with and great for forming. Thanks very much for the pointer.

Found it - galvanised stud channel (or purlins would be another source)
 
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GAP

GAP

G Scale Trains, HO Trains
Cheers GAP, yes I think the sectioning completely is probably the easiest approach.

I particularly like that U channel ladder section idea though. I'm going to look at the availability and compare costs with the cable tray and will consider that for the rest of the layout - if it's comparable it'd be easier to work with and great for forming. Thanks very much for the pointer.

Found it - galvanised stud channel (or purlins would be another source)
Yep purlins are what I use.
I'm doing a curve shortly but will not section, I will cut "V's" across the purlin leaving the outside intact and bend to form the curve and screw strapping to the inside to add strength then I'll screw my Villa Board (Hardiebacker) to the purlin.
 
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