Making sleepers/ties

justme igor

justme igor

Registered
17 Apr 2020
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Netherlands Westwoud
PART ONE!!!
Thanks to the knowledge of the people on the forum, i proceeded with figuring out a production to make sleepers/ties for my tracks.

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I had some wood left over from the carport, they sold it to me as azobe wood, but i think it is oak.
It was basically for firewood.
But i have other plans for them right now
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Cutting them into thick slaps

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Cut them into strips.
Where is that cleaning lady, saw dust al over....No worry i have a pro dusk mask on, the ventilation is not adequate enough and the filter/suction still must be installed....
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Cut them into 1 x 1 cm pieces.....5 x 20kg (dogfood) bags full of sawdust.....
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I am really fond of making jigs,,,makes life so much easyer. for the next batch i just can get the jig fit for that job and screw it onto the bench.
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If you want to copy what i am doing and you are NOT comfortable with this....PLEASE STOP HERE.....i am a professional carpenter for 30 years plus....not a hobbiest!
Be careful at all times!!!!machines dont forgive or feel...
And do what they are designed for....CUT
I do much more stupidity things with those machines, i can trim my nails if i want to, you are NOT me
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Running out of trays.....
Some buckets of azobe or oak, some buckets of unknown orange wood(smelly when sawing), and some buckets with bankirai wood.
I am planning to use more hard woods to see what will last longer.
Also cut some meranti hardwood.
Fir(coniferas: tutuja in my case) will be next when this batch is converted into track. After that one i going to buy Azobe and stick with that.
A better wood would be palisander, but my wallet is protesting.
The balance between cost/time/ect incl wood stain would be a perfect price/quality ratio would be azobe wood, no fuzz just cut and use without wood stain?

Anybody has an idea on this???please any thought is welcome, thanks in advance.

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After cutting them to length they still need a slut to put the tracks in.
I made this jig with the jig on the sawing table to make sure i have a inside distance of 44,9 mm and a outside distance of 49,1mm.
I use 2 mm thick aluminium.
I bought a other sawblade of a cutting width of 2.2mm to give some more clearance, the saw blade that was 2.0 mm was just not big enough, too tight.
Didnt work, to much trouble.

I think it would be worth the effort to make a machine just for this job, i need a machinist for this, my old man was, we sold everything.
Lathe and all.
I am refuring to the machine from those folks at denver railway, i will post some pics


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After playing a full day with wood stain alike(old recipe, i wont share, google is your friend, or a old fashioned carpenter) your fingers have the look that they where somewhere very deep...no need for explanation i guess?

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One day of work with my woodstain......
Bucket number one sock for one to 6 hours. bucket number 2 & 3 let it drip for 12 hours minimum. All closed
Bucket number 4: Let them dry in open air.......
Dont forget to do your hippy hippy shake rattle and roll, before they stick together and on the hdpe!


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By the way: for this whole process i used THREE different saw blades....any carpenter will understand.
A hobbyies will need one.

Well that is it for my production process, for now, if you think: if i forget something or you want to have more info on a bit/piece....please remind me!
Comments, thoughts, ideas or whatever are very appreciated!
It is very appreciated! Any thought or comment!
Thanks for reading and i hope i could tribute something to someone!
You can do this with very little investment regarding machinery.....

Best to you all and thanks for reading.
 

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PhilP

PhilP

G Scale, 7/8th's, Electronics
5 Jun 2013
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Tamworth, Staffs.
It means the link to the Google (or is it Amazon) storage (for pictures) is broken, at the moment..
It is a Bank Holiday here in the UK, so I guess Paul is out enjoying the weather?

Normal service will be resumed, when it is..
 
justme igor

justme igor

Registered
17 Apr 2020
113
40
48
Netherlands Westwoud
So Paul got his deserved holiday and he fixed the problem.
Thanks Paul!
 
dunnyrail

dunnyrail

DOGS, Garden Railways, Steam Trains, Jive Dancing,
25 Oct 2009
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St.Neots Cambridgeshire UK
While stain does the job it has little preservative powers. Best for that is to soak them in 2nd hand engine sump oil, not environmentally friendly but that is why it preserves the sleepers so well.
 
PhilP

PhilP

G Scale, 7/8th's, Electronics
5 Jun 2013
25,878
1,461
Tamworth, Staffs.
Long ago... Probably when their vans were green?

Telegraph poles were left to soak in a mix of old sump-oil, and creosote.. - Seemed to work for them!
 
justme igor

justme igor

Registered
17 Apr 2020
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Netherlands Westwoud
Creosote? that stuff from the chimi? and mix that with old used(or new)engine oil?(that is what you mean with: sump oil?)
I used a: look a like "carboleum".
I can think of one problem with engine(sump?) oil, the putty i use wont stick?
Best.
 
Greg Elmassian

Greg Elmassian

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Can you tell us again what your white "goo" is that is the glue for the rail in the tie?

Have you been able to tell if staining the tie first affects the "gluing strength" of the "goo"?

Greg
 
justme igor

justme igor

Registered
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Netherlands Westwoud
The goo is Poly max high tack, also available in brown and black.
It will harden/stiffen up over time, fully cured after 4 weeks.

The strength is the same, the wood stain is getting into the wood, paint is on top of the wood, if you would paint it you must relay on the paint strength.
For this application is paint not advisable....moister will get in, but not out.
With wood stain the wood can dry.
To maxim the surface that has been thread it is better to treat first with wood stain(after cutting the slots!!) then glue it with Poly max.
Just in case there is a pocket.
I hope this was the answer you were looking for?
Best.
 
justme igor

justme igor

Registered
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Netherlands Westwoud
No, for durability machine slots first then stain, you must close the wood completely.
For pulling strength it does not matter on wood stain, with paint it does, paint is weaker
 
Greg Elmassian

Greg Elmassian

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I know most glues do not hold as well on stain, but I think what is happening is that it's good enough and better than paint.

Most stains leave at the worst an oily surface, and at the best, less penetration for the glue.

But, it works well enough it seems.

Greg
 
maxi-model

maxi-model

UK/US/ROW steam narrow gauge railways 1:1
27 Oct 2009
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Bucks/Oxon/Northants area
There is sometimes a problem with terminology around wood stain and wood dye. Wood stain can sometimes be an alias for what is in reality a translucent coloured lacquer, or wood varnish - at least that's the issue I get when I go in the DIY store. That type of product will affect bonding of the material it has been applied too to another as you are bonding to the lacquer medium on the surface of the wood and getting only minimal additional "mechanical" grip from what grain is still not filled by the lacquer and how far the lacquer has been able to penetrate the wood - probably not much.

Wood dye on the other hand, also sometimes referred to as wood stain, is a spirit or water based fluid, with the consistency of water. That product soaks right into the wood but still leaving the wood's grain open once if has dried. When you apply an adhesive to a wood dyed component, whether with PVA or CA, it is able to penetrate the wood unhindered and is limited only by the properties of the bonding medium itself. You have to apply that product before using any adhesive or lacquers as they make a surface barrier to the wood dye. But you will know all that :)

My preference when building wood kits is to use a wood dye, spirit based for ease of application (oh I detest those water based product forced on us nowadays) prior to any assembly. I then build up all the sub assemblies, using PVA or CA dependent (sometimes contact or silicon) based on the application, and then I may use a coloured wood stain/varnish to add a little depth to the colour used and provide a protective finish. Max
 
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Greg Elmassian

Greg Elmassian

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We have the issue here too... usually the stain says "penetrating" for what you are calling dye (dye is not a common term here), and "sealer" or "sealing stain"...

I agree on using a stain that only dyes the wood, and leaves the wood better able to be glued. By the way, we also hate the water based junk, it just never works as well...

Greg