Wood, imitation or real...?

Henri

Henri

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As the Backer & Rueb tram loco is finally reaching it's completion (YES!!), my next project should be the build of at least one, maybe two, accompanying coaches.

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The coaches are made of I think teak wood.

What would the more experienced modellers here do? Go for 'all wood', or plasticard base and glued on wood strips or all plasticard with painted on wood imitation?

Like to read some opinions here... Especially as I've seen some excellent painted wood imitations here lately!
 
Gizzy

Gizzy

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Wood is the most realistic, even if it was ply, or balsa on plasticard.

But as you say Henri, some paint finishes can look very much like teak....
 
Madman

Madman

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Don't knock on wood..... :rofl:
 
David1226

David1226

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I guess its down to what material you are most comfortable and competent in working with. I am no woodworker, I have always modelled in plastic. There have been some superb models, shown on the Forum, made by painstakingly gluing individual coffee stirrers together, the wood is then painted which covers up and obliterates the work. I have to ask 'why bother;. Much is made on the Forum of 'the eight foot rule' whereby it is reckoned that on a garden layout most models a viewed from no closer than eight feet away, at which distance much fine detail is not seen anyway. Contrary to that argument I put a fair amount of detail into my stock, but then I am an indoor modeller, whereby viewing will be at a closer distance, even so I include a lot of detail that will not be seen at any distance. It's all down to satisfaction of the builder and whatever rocks your world. There have also been some amazing examples of plastic dressed up, painted and weathered to replicate wood that I would love to have the skill to emulate. I consider myself to be very much middle of the road with my plastic/wood representations, but the results please me and I am the most important critic that I know.

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David
 
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maxi-model

maxi-model

UK/US/ROW steam narrow gauge railways 1:1
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I've tried both. Both items are around 16 mm scale. The resin coach has a scumbled finish, first attempt, got lucky - I used a salmon pink base coat (not white as some do, take a long hard look at a Gresley teak coach and it will make sense) and Phoenix Precision paints Teak finish "almost dry brushed on. The brake van was a Coloron wood dye with a satin varnish top coat. The final appearance of stained ply can be a bit hit and miss depending on the grain in the ply's surface. Always stain before using any adhesive or sealers. Max

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Henri

Henri

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D David , your wood imitation is spot on. Very, very well done!!

I've seen some Youtube vids where a brown/orange base was applied and then a kind of 'drybrush' with oil paint was applied imitating the wood structure. That looked also very impressive...

Yes my plastic skills are much better than woodwork, I like to have the coaches at least have a plastic 'structure' (glue coffee stirrers over it...?).
An all wood coach would be so fragile and weather influences would be an issue.
 
Henri

Henri

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maxi-model maxi-model This is also very, very well done. This matches my standards and the finish I'd like to get! (the coach in your pics). Thanks for these examples!
 
David1226

David1226

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Henri

I did not describe how I actually paint my wood. I use enamel paints, I give the are two base coats of a basic wood colour, current favourite is Humbrol No 93, Desert Sand. I then use an old ceramic tile as a mixing pallet, putting a generous blob of the base colour on it, I then usually start with some matt white mixed in to create lighter shade which I use to re-paint individual planks/slats. I then do the same with a spot of matt black to create darker shades. I have dry brushed a darker shade over the planks on my freight wagons but I do not bother with coach interiors as they would be cleaner and the detail would not be seen anyway.

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David
 
dunnyrail

dunnyrail

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D David , your wood imitation is spot on. Very, very well done!!

I've seen some Youtube vids where a brown/orange base was applied and then a kind of 'drybrush' with oil paint was applied imitating the wood structure. That looked also very impressive...

Yes my plastic skills are much better than woodwork, I like to have the coaches at least have a plastic 'structure' (glue coffee stirrers over it...?).
An all wood coach would be so fragile and weather influences would be an issue.
Have to say that I do like working with wood. Something satisfying about using the real thing to create the real Model. This coach was built when I had interest in Irish Narrow Gauge Railways, it is based in a Tralee and Dingle Coach. The LGB Bogies let it down some sadly leaving the Coach sitting a little high to my eye, but it runs and looks fine at the end of the TnD Cattle Train I have also built. Fairly thickish Ply was used for the Base with much thinner for the sides and end partitions. The Partitions do give a lot of internal Strength as does the varying uprights from Square Stock (Siding to our US Friends). Fine Veneer was cut up for much of the detail, this veneer is used by Aircraft Modellers’ to cover Wings.

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I even went mad to add Opening Doors, bit of a waste of time really but I probably needed to prove to myself that I could do it.

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Fred2179G

Fred2179G

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I've built several wooden coaches, and I must admit that Max's coach is one of the best I have seen. However, using a piece of wood that has been grooved/scribed to look like planks is likely to produce the grain effect:



The brake van was a Coloron wood dye with a satin varnish top coat. The final appearance of stained ply can be a bit hit and miss depending on the grain in the ply's surface.
That van shows the same effect - it's unlikely the railroad wanted matched wood panels! The only way around it is to use plastic/styrene or individual planks.
 
Henri

Henri

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Very good read chaps! Thanks!

I bought a few colors for experiments.

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Paulus

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Bill Barnwell

Bill Barnwell

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Being as I live in Florida word wood is synonymous with the word rot so I don't build anything out of wood, everything I build is PCV or styrene usually scraped with a course saw blade to give grain and the painted with several different colors of both rattle cans and or acrylics and so far the results have been good.
 

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trammayo

trammayo

Interested in vintage commercial vehicle, trams, t
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I build rolling stock with wood and then paint it - and I also use cardboard (again painted) ....

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As long as I take stuff back into to the shed it has lasted (so far) fifteen years. I use Obechi ply of different thickness and scribe it. I have plastic sheets purchased but I cannot get out of the habit of using wood! Probably the downside of me using wood is the scale thickness of the combined layers of paint!
 
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Paulus

Paulus

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I build rolling stock with wood and then paint it - and I also use cardboard (again painted) ....
Your rolling stock looks great! But how does the cardboard react to damp weather? Is the paint enough protection?
 
trammayo

trammayo

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Your rolling stock looks great! But how does the cardboard react to damp weather? Is the paint enough protection?
To be honest, I haven't had any problems. Maybe it's because I used traditional household paint and not the modern stuff?
 
Paulus

Paulus

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To be honest, I haven't had any problems. Maybe it's because I used traditional household paint and not the modern stuff?
Okay thanks! The old turpentine based paint that is I assume ;-) The reason I asked is that I had build a little railcar lately and the roof and doors were made out of cardboard actually only to get it done fast. I was planning to replace these but perhaps painting some extra layers over it will work just fine. I like cardboard as material but I am a bit reluctant to use it because of weather (though I never ride trains in the rain...)
 
trammayo

trammayo

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Yes the old turpentine! Of course, it goes without saying, that both sides (and edges) need painting!