Short Track Pieces

Greg Elmassian

Registered
8 Mar 2014
5,247
722
San Diego
www.elmassian.com
Country flag
Yes, there are many such compounds, most are called "Anti-sieze" here, and have copper, nickel, or sometimes aluminum in them.

I actually prefer the nickel to copper, but that is just splitting hairs. I have been using anti-sieze on things like this since 1969.

Goes great on the end of a Mini Cooper crankshaft, for any of those who have replaced a clutch on the same.

Greg
 

JimmyB

Semi-Retired; more time for trains.
Country flag
Hard for people to believe but as it is actually grease, it is used on brake systems to prevent squealing.
 

Gerard

Registered
26 Mar 2021
27
2
71
Aerdenhout Holland
Country flag
Hello,

I promised to inform you all about more copper grease info from my friend.
He told me that he dissolves the grease using turpentine.
The turpentine will be evaporated in short time leaving the original grease.
He also told me that the main reason for the excellent performence against corrosion of the brass connections is the extreme temperature of about 350 degr celcius or even more the grease can cope with. The rail can be extremely hot in the summer so most types of grease will vanish, but this one stays betwee the connections.
He uses the grease for 10 years now and he still has not any problem. When he detaches the connections they all look like brand new brass.

Greatings
Gerard
 

Greg Elmassian

Registered
8 Mar 2014
5,247
722
San Diego
www.elmassian.com
Country flag
Ok, that solvent makes much more sense!

I don't agree that the 350 degree temp rating really makes a difference, that temp is more the breakdown temperature of lubricating, but all the anti-siezes I use come with a high rating, often up to 2500 degrees F.

It's more of a quality of how thick it stays, I think there is a rating of "drip point"...

So all I am saying is these compounds are usually thick and stay in place, and often "plate" metal, i.e. not real plating, but have an extreme affinity for metal.

The entire key is keeping air, dirt, and moisture away from the metal, as you are stating.

Greg