LSoldersticks

KeithT

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I just came across this video.It is a product I have never encountered previously
Whilst soldering isn’t my best skill I can generally manage however, I have a resin steam pumping station where the motor is buried several inches within the building with access only from the base. The supply wires to the motor have severed and access to resolder them is impossible without pulling the building apart. Not possible as I made sure it would never fall apar!
However, these could provide a solution with VERY careful manipulation of a blowtorch.
Reviews online vary widely.
Has anyone experience of them for modelling?
 

PhilP

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You can also use a hot air reflow tool to melt these..

You just need to be careful where the hot air is also going! :nerd: :devil:

Though if you can get one of these in to place, and a blowtorch, then I reckon I could get a conventional soldering iron in..

Photos of the problem please..

PhilP
 

Gizzy

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Yes I have.

Used in aviation quite a lot.

Place the wires within the ring of solder.

Use a hot air gun to melt the solder and also shrink the insulation.

Check visually that the solder has flowed onto the wires and if possible a gentle tug to make sure you have a mechanical as well as an electrical connection....
 
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So, I would not use them in high current or areas that flex:

  1. there is NO mechanical connection, the wires are held together by solder... and anyone who has read anything about soldering knows that having a mechanical connection BEFORE adding solder is important
  2. since there is no mechanical connection, the resistance of the soldered joint is higher, not good for high current
  3. the solder is an even "softer" solder than normal. Most solder melts at about 600-650 degrees F. Clearly your heat gun is not doing that (the plastic would catch on fire and melt off. So if you know about solders, this is an even weaker bond
  4. any flexing would tend to crack the soldered joint.
Use at your own risk, and no way this is approved for mains cables....
 

dunnyrail

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Look like a good option, he shows them covered with heat shrink. I think I would use this as well after heating and melting the solder (yes I see he is talking about for insulation in the Vid) but I would use the heat shrink fitted some way from the joint. Check the joint then put the shrink in place then shrink it to help keep out dampness if multi core cable used. The pack of sundry colours look useful as well for id’ing wires.
 

GAP

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I have used these extensively on aircraft avionic wiring and they are mechanically and electrically sound.
In some the heat shrink covering bends the metal tabs either side of the solder area so they act like a crimp to give the mechanical strength while in others there is an adhesive inside the heatshrink that provides water ingress resistance, the solder provides good electrical conductivity.
If the heat gun used can shrink heat shrink then it is hot enough to use with these a blowtorch with a nozzle that can direct the airflow will work fine if used carefully.
To use the insulation is stripped back and the the exposed wires are overlapped withing the solder area.
I would not use them for mains applications but for the application described they should be more than adequate.

A few specs
 
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JimmyB

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I have bought some, but not used them yet, as Greg Elmassian Greg Elmassian points out there would be some areas where they would not be suitable, and mains cabling would certainly be one area not to use them.
 

PhilP

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They are a little bulky (or can be) so it depends on how much 'wiggle' room you have to work in.

I have not come across those with metal 'crimps' to grip the cable, but those with the heat-activated adhesive are very effective.

PhilP
 

KeithT

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As ever, many thanks for the prompt and helpful replies.
i have ordered a trial pack but in fact when I looked again at the problem, I hadn’t bothered with it for a while, I discovered that the pffending wire had become detached from the motor tag and so the soldersticks won’t work!!
My only option will be to dig out the geriatric long reach soldering iron inherited from my father. That should be fun.
I will find a use for the pack I ordered, the max voltage I intend using them for is 18-24v.
 

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Paul M

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I have used these extensively on aircraft avionic wiring and they are mechanically and electrically sound.
In some the heat shrink covering bends the metal tabs either side of the solder area so they act like a crimp to give the mechanical strength while in others there is an adhesive inside the heatshrink that provides water ingress resistance, the solder provides good electrical conductivity.
If the heat gun used can shrink heat shrink then it is hot enough to use with these a blowtorch with a nozzle that can direct the airflow will work fine if used carefully.
To use the insulation is stripped back and the the exposed wires are overlapped withing the solder area.
I would not use them for mains applications but for the application described they should be more than adequate.

A few specs
If they're used in aviation applications, I, for one, certainly hope they work. Flying is horrible enough with having to worry about dodgy soldering
 

KeithT

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.please delete
 
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KeithT

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-Please delete
 
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The force exerted by heat shrink compressing (at that size) could hardly exert enough force to "crimp" a metal tab around anything.

Really,, think about it. I know you want to promote their use, but it solidly violates one of the fundamentals that is always recommended for a good solder joint.

I would not fly in a plane with these used in it.

I really think this is not a good idea for anything critical.
 
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Slawman

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I have been using these for my outdoor layout for a few years. Aside from making sure you get the quality ones which activate properly and completely when you apply heat (I use hot air), they are pretty simple to use. Also good for marine applications where I have had them last for three or four years no problem. As long as the joint is protected from movement they are fine and a useful addition to the kit.
 

Gtarling

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In my (admittedly somewhat limited) aviation experience as a licenced avionic engineer, I only ever experienced these (or similar) items being used on shielded cables, for the purpose of joining a 'tail' to the screen to allow it to be easily grounded. I never experienced their use for joining 'normal' current carrying wires and wouldn't have thought thay'd be suitable for that purpose unless the design was changed substantially from those that I experienced.

G.
 

JimmyB

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For my twopenny worth, as an (ex) Aircraft Safety Engineer, and for CAA/EASA/FAA etc registered aircraft, all components used in safety critical systems must be certified and approved by the appropriate Aviation Authority, all modifications including repairs must be carried out by licenced engineers to agreed work plans, use agreed tools and equipment, and is some cases these changes need to be registered with the appropriate Authority. So if and when these are used on aircraft, then is MUST be in approved circumstances only.
 

GAP

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For my twopenny worth, as an (ex) Aircraft Safety Engineer, and for CAA/EASA/FAA etc registered aircraft, all components used in safety critical systems must be certified and approved by the appropriate Aviation Authority, all modifications including repairs must be carried out by licenced engineers to agreed work plans, use agreed tools and equipment, and is some cases these changes need to be registered with the appropriate Authority. So if and when these are used on aircraft, then is MUST be in approved circumstances only.
Sums it up quite well there Jimmy.
My experience was;
All work conducted must be recorded in each individual aircraft's maintenance log which is never destroyed even if the aircraft is scrapped.
All tradesman's work must be certified by a qualified and authorised supervisor.
Getting authorised to conduct maintenance on aircraft or there components is not an easy task and getting certifying qualifications is no mean feat and they are renewed annually.
We had a list of approved technical manuals and tools that could be used no exceptions.
The biggest threat to aircraft safety is the presence of counterfeit parts and ones taken off crashed aircraft and fed back into the supply chain with false certificates of conformance.
 

JimmyB

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The biggest threat to aircraft safety is the presence of counterfeit parts and ones taken off crashed aircraft and fed back into the supply chain with false certificates of conformance.
Yes one of the biggest safety risks in our hazard log.
 

KeithT

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Well, they have arrived, described on the box as “Self Sold… Truck Stereo Wire Joint. Made in China.”
(Where else?)
They are not suitable for my original purpose as the connecting wire had broken from the motor tab but, yesterday I managed to chop through one of the track feed cables whilst using an electric edge trimmer.
B####r!
I shall experiment with a couple of the larger ones.