LGB points vs 0-4-0

Greg Elmassian

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8 Mar 2014
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San Diego
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A few comments, paralleling what has already been said:

live frogs are great for short wheelbase locos, or ones with few pickups, but powering the frog has it's own issues.
The LGB frogs with the metal inserts in the bottom of the flangeway is a workaround that has been utilized on many scales, we even have it in Marklin Z scale. Unfortunately, it depends on a "flange bearing" frog, where the wheel tread no longer rides on the rails at the frog, but the wheel flange is the contact point. This lifting of the wheel off the rails and then riding on the flange and then going clonk back to the rail head is not "smooth", and has various negative factors, if you have a loco without a sprung suspension, lifting a wheel may lift the other wheels on that side and break contact, also it depends on the flange on the wheel, all your locos will want the same flange depth, and this is rare between brands.

Greg
 

dutchelm

Registered
24 Oct 2009
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N Somerset
One problem found with R1 points is the plastic frog is too high. It lifts the loco & if the other wheel has a tyre the loco stops due to lack of electric.
Cure - 1 File the plastic flat, 2 replace the tyre wheel with a plain wheel, 3 connect a wagon behind with extra pickups.
 

Greg Elmassian

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8 Mar 2014
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San Diego
www.elmassian.com
Are the plastic "rails" higher than the metal rails?

We had that issue with Aristo WR turnouts (10' diameter) and I milled mind down in situ with a router with the bit even the the base, so as the base was on the rails, and the frog stuck up, the frog top was trimmed to flush with the rails, once set up, took only seconds to do.

But that reduced the depth of the flangeways so had to deepen them to compensate.

Greg
 

dutchelm

Registered
24 Oct 2009
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N Somerset
On some badly made points the plastic frog is big enough to lift the loco. A flat file to bring it down level & then the edge of the file to deepen the flangeway.
 

Edgar

Registered
13 May 2020
102
5
58
Tennessee
Thank you for your thoughts and taking time to comment. I had already figured for the added expense and using R5’s on the main line for a reconfigured layout I just hate when I spend extra money for something unjustified, especially if it doesn’t do what I had in mind.
 

JimmyB

Semi-Retired; more time for trains.

Edgar

Registered
13 May 2020
102
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Tennessee
I was thinking three. Sadly my editors are only available after publication.
 

Gavin Sowry

Garden Railroader and Raconteur
27 Oct 2009
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Hutt Valley, NZ
Here is the benefit of having used R1 LGB for 20 years.

I use LGB R1 points exclusively. I do remember having problems, a long long time ago.
Basically, it came down to making sure the live rails have absolutely no cross level (cant) irregularities.
The 4 wheels must be in contact with the rail at all times. If there is a dip in the track, or twist, then the 4 wheels won't be in contact.
On the same side of the loco, if one wheel is insulated, or on the frog, and the other wheel is lifted off the rail, then you stop.
Thing to watch for, too, is the frog rail dipping down after the plastic frog.

If I ever have a stall, first thing I check is the level...… and I'm running an LGB O&K engine too.
 

Edgar

Registered
13 May 2020
102
5
58
Tennessee
All the information concerning the fickleness of points is very interesting and I’m sure others will also find it useful. I bought the first R1 point about 25 years ago and quickly accumulated 13 of them. All my track is LGB, and except for one short oval that included two 24” straights, it was all purchased new. I bought on R3 point last year and I’m sold on the sweeping curves offered with R5. Given the right circumstances, I would be ecstatic to have a dozen more R1 points. Most of my track laying experience has been on the undulating surface of the particle board flooring in the living room. I had figured out that the transition from hard floor to rug is not the prim spot to position a switch. This past year outside with y’all has been new. And others here were definitely happy not having a 100’ of track in the floor this past holiday season. I’m guessing the question if I might regret purchasing a couple of R5 points has been answered. Thanks guys!
 

dunnyrail

DOGS, Garden Railways, Steam Trains, Jive Dancing,
25 Oct 2009
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St.Neots Cambridgeshire UK
Other thing I forgot to mention (because I have before a few times) is the possibility of loss of current to the rails that move and also the bit after the frog. The connections (some stamped) can and do break down. I hard wire all of these now in my R1’s including the bit of rail that relies on the raised brass just by where the rail slides across. Not saying it guarantees perfection but it does get rid of a possible catalogue of faults.
 

Dan

Registered
28 Jan 2010
395
36
Eastern MA
I have found several fixes for engines stalling on switches that may be track related. The points slide across a olated bar and I clean this with a piece of the track cleaner duiscarded worn ring. I aslo on one R1 had to solder in a copper braid (read solder wick) to keep power on the moving rail.
I beliebe the traction tire and bad rail contact caused this issue of 1 engiine stalling. Moguls run better as the tenders have power pickups as well as the engine.