IP Engineering chassis build

Hal Farsed

Hal Farsed

D.P. Gumby.
7 Apr 2014
417
575
Staffordshire, England.
Hello all, bit of a long shot I think. I have cobbled together enough bits to build a chassis out of IPE/LC models bits and pieces. Just enquiring if anyone has any bits for IP Engineerings metal shunters they dont want. Cab sheets bonnets castings etc. Like I said long shot but you never know. If theres nothing available, I will have to let my imagination run riot. Thanks anyway!




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dunnyrail

dunnyrail

DOGS, Garden Railways, Steam Trains, Jive Dancing,
25 Oct 2009
18,016
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St.Neots Cambridgeshire UK
IPE stuff goes together very well, built an Irish Walker Diesel Loco using IPE parts for the chassis, fell together and worked perfect first time. Outside fly cranks and all.
5F4339A1-7828-4859-BFA6-2B612C16B54C.jpeg 371A338D-277D-455F-A107-2904967BD0DA.jpeg
 
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Rhinochugger

Rhinochugger

Retired Oik
27 Oct 2009
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North West Norfolk
P

Paul M

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:envy: isn't this an envy emoji?
 
Hal Farsed

Hal Farsed

D.P. Gumby.
7 Apr 2014
417
575
Staffordshire, England.
Thats a cracker Dunnyrail!
 
Hal Farsed

Hal Farsed

D.P. Gumby.
7 Apr 2014
417
575
Staffordshire, England.
Well, Time flies. I have progressed my little loco on a bit. I have asked around, and IP tin shunter bits seem to be like the proverbial rocking horse poo. I will therefore, have to put a body of my design on it. (Possible disaster alert.) I am now trying not to let it cost me anything but I will probably have to buy some Plastikard, MekPac and (definitely) screws.

So far, I have removed the gearbox as it was not up to the job. The wormwheel is fitted with a 12BA x 1/8” slotted head grubscrew, tightening this with any force at all results in the screw slot splitting and it still not being tight enough to attach the wormwheel to the axle to drive six wheels. I did consider Loctite (the blue stuff), but you risk gluing the lot solid as the wormwheel is captured by the 3D printed gearbox. What I mean to say is that the assembly would have to be glued in situ, therefore there is a (high for me) risk of getting glue on the bearings in the gearbox. I will find a railbus or some light duty vehicle to use it in. I managed to get one of those Indiana Jones Lorries (you know, the German thing with the “canvas” (plastic) cover on the back) before the prices on EBay went potty. It might be a fit in there for its use on rails.

Instead of the proposed gearbox, I have used my usual method of a Slater’s wormwheel assembly, 4mm/2mm coupling and a MFA 15:1 Motor gearbox. (Yes, these were in my bits box, for a long abandoned idea.) I thought I had a sheet of Aluminium to make the footplate, but I couldn’t find it, so I have used some 3mm Plywood, braced with 10mm x 10mm x 1mm Aluminium angle iron (the (6BA) screws are in temporarily until I can get hold of some shorter ones). The angle iron is predrilled to accept the, yet to be made, body on top.

The back story for this loco, it is the result of a local Electrical Engineering firms attempt to build a viable, battery powered (neat uh?) shunting/trip locomotive. They built some 3 foot gauge locos as a test bed for the usual reasons railways built narrow gauge lines. The particular loco in my possession will have been used to demonstrate its usefulness in the military; therefore it will have a camouflaged livery. (Quite how I am going to paint that I don’t know, but YouTube will be my instructor. Every day is a school day with this hobby.)

If I can get a Pantograph for less than an arm and a leg, I would like to stick one of these on the cab roof. Then, of course I can say it is a “Bimode” locomotive. So on trend! (Anyone have a pan they want rid of?) I suppose I could make some sort of “tram-esque” collector hoop...

Body wise, I did give some thought to “steampunk”, post apocalyptic gibberish, but decided against it. I can’t see the point of sticking gearwheels on the side for no apparent reason. So I looked then at those NER Electrics. A sort of cut down and bodged version of these would suffice, I think. The rounded nose might be a step too far for my dubious plastic bending skills though. Or possibly a double ended loco with Hunslet shaped bonnets. These would be nice and simple to make but the bonnets will have to be full width due to the Aluminium plywood braces. Hey ho, I shall see what happens.

Whatever, there will be rivets to count. Last year, for my Birthday, my partner, (gawd bless ‘er) treated me to a Pdf Models Baldwin loco tractor and a very nice model it is too. However, I chickened out of applying the tiny, tiny rivets supplied with it to decorate the bonnet and cabs as I did not want to ruin it. This cobbled together loco will be a test bed for my riveting skills that I will then apply to the tractor...hopefully. I do have a bag of 1/32” rivets and I am flip flopping between these and the stick on ones. Like I said, every day is a school day with this hobby.



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Rhinochugger

Rhinochugger

Retired Oik
27 Oct 2009
28,509
3,437
North West Norfolk
Well, Time flies. I have progressed my little loco on a bit. I have asked around, and IP tin shunter bits seem to be like the proverbial rocking horse poo. I will therefore, have to put a body of my design on it. (Possible disaster alert.) I am now trying not to let it cost me anything but I will probably have to buy some Plastikard, MekPac and (definitely) screws.

So far, I have removed the gearbox as it was not up to the job. The wormwheel is fitted with a 12BA x 1/8” slotted head grubscrew, tightening this with any force at all results in the screw slot splitting and it still not being tight enough to attach the wormwheel to the axle to drive six wheels. I did consider Loctite (the blue stuff), but you risk gluing the lot solid as the wormwheel is captured by the 3D printed gearbox. What I mean to say is that the assembly would have to be glued in situ, therefore there is a (high for me) risk of getting glue on the bearings in the gearbox. I will find a railbus or some light duty vehicle to use it in. I managed to get one of those Indiana Jones Lorries (you know, the German thing with the “canvas” (plastic) cover on the back) before the prices on EBay went potty. It might be a fit in there for its use on rails.

Instead of the proposed gearbox, I have used my usual method of a Slater’s wormwheel assembly, 4mm/2mm coupling and a MFA 15:1 Motor gearbox. (Yes, these were in my bits box, for a long abandoned idea.) I thought I had a sheet of Aluminium to make the footplate, but I couldn’t find it, so I have used some 3mm Plywood, braced with 10mm x 10mm x 1mm Aluminium angle iron (the (6BA) screws are in temporarily until I can get hold of some shorter ones). The angle iron is predrilled to accept the, yet to be made, body on top.

The back story for this loco, it is the result of a local Electrical Engineering firms attempt to build a viable, battery powered (neat uh?) shunting/trip locomotive. They built some 3 foot gauge locos as a test bed for the usual reasons railways built narrow gauge lines. The particular loco in my possession will have been used to demonstrate its usefulness in the military; therefore it will have a camouflaged livery. (Quite how I am going to paint that I don’t know, but YouTube will be my instructor. Every day is a school day with this hobby.)

If I can get a Pantograph for less than an arm and a leg, I would like to stick one of these on the cab roof. Then, of course I can say it is a “Bimode” locomotive. So on trend! (Anyone have a pan they want rid of?) I suppose I could make some sort of “tram-esque” collector hoop...

Body wise, I did give some thought to “steampunk”, post apocalyptic gibberish, but decided against it. I can’t see the point of sticking gearwheels on the side for no apparent reason. So I looked then at those NER Electrics. A sort of cut down and bodged version of these would suffice, I think. The rounded nose might be a step too far for my dubious plastic bending skills though. Or possibly a double ended loco with Hunslet shaped bonnets. These would be nice and simple to make but the bonnets will have to be full width due to the Aluminium plywood braces. Hey ho, I shall see what happens.

Whatever, there will be rivets to count. Last year, for my Birthday, my partner, (gawd bless ‘er) treated me to a Pdf Models Baldwin loco tractor and a very nice model it is too. However, I chickened out of applying the tiny, tiny rivets supplied with it to decorate the bonnet and cabs as I did not want to ruin it. This cobbled together loco will be a test bed for my riveting skills that I will then apply to the tractor...hopefully. I do have a bag of 1/32” rivets and I am flip flopping between these and the stick on ones. Like I said, every day is a school day with this hobby.



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Yes, I think the 6 wheel version was less popular in terms of IP bodies :nod::nod:

I'm also quite an expert in failed gearboxes, having experimented extensively with an identical chassis.

You can file a flat on the axle to prevent having to overtighten the grub screw, but in the end I splashed out large and bought an ECM gearbox and motor.

Ratios were always an issue, and the most successful simple gearbox was one that I scratch built by using a bit of ali bar and bending it into a U shape, the drilling for motor and axle with worm and gear robbed from a Bachmann Bug Mauler. The motor was not quite in perfick alignment, but the gearbox ran smoothly and reliably, but the ratio was too high for anything but a dead flat track.

I also experimented with 0 Gauge sprung axle boxes, dispensed with the whizzy cranks and coupled the axles internally with delrin chain and sprocket.

It now bears the name Yeti - as in yetinother gearbox :emo::emo:
 
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Hal Farsed

Hal Farsed

D.P. Gumby.
7 Apr 2014
417
575
Staffordshire, England.
Yes Rhinochugger, I have had great fun in trying to make these IP locos actually work, including the Delrin method. The glue to attach the plastic gears to the steel axle is massively noxious from memory. But I do like my wizzy cranks, so it didnt get too far. There was a chap on 'tube who had mounted a motor in the bonnet, driving a huge gear on the middle axle. I nearly copied him but the bonnet appeared so full of motor, he only had room for a small battery. Which probably leads us on to LiPo or the like. I am a bit apprehensive about these. Anyway, who would have thought my favourite lesson in school was Technical Drawing? It was. So heres three drawings. Bonnets, Cab inside and out. The mists are clearing. I have even sussed out how to make a (non working) pantograph. But thats still in my head.

CAB13102020.PNG CONTROL13102020.PNG
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Rhinochugger

Rhinochugger

Retired Oik
27 Oct 2009
28,509
3,437
North West Norfolk
Yes Rhinochugger, I have had great fun in trying to make these IP locos actually work, including the Delrin method. The glue to attach the plastic gears to the steel axle is massively noxious from memory.
Ah, I can explain, I had already changed the axles, the detail disappears in a mist of the myriad changes that I have done, but I started to us Tenmille coach axles and wheels because the resin insert in the wheel had just a little bit more 'give' than the IP solid steel wheel and, if nothing else, at least softened the sound over rough track joints (my loco has a nickel silver soldered body from Worsley Works which acts as a sounding board). The spin-off is that the centre sections of the axles are 1/4" and the Delrin gears are a good solid push-on fit.