Hi all I’m a complete noob here!

Greg Elmassian

Greg Elmassian

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From smaller indoor scales, NS rail seems to have much less oxidation than brass, but outdoors, in my experience and many others here in the US, NS rail seems to oxidize just as quickly as brass, and people have theorized it is the moisture that does it, since the experiences have been reported from coast to coast here. Also it seems that oxide removal is a bit tougher than brass.

Greg
 
P

Paradise

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Thanks Greg. I know you have stainless steel rail which seems to the the best as far as reducing oxidization for electric rail running. Pity it is not easy to come by now.
I know what nickel plating does when left outside in moisture. LGB electric point motors are testament, eventually after several years crudding up with white oxide from the nickel plating then even worse, the brown oxide from the steel until the internals don't slide anymore.
 
Greg Elmassian

Greg Elmassian

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Well, the nickel plated brass seems to be a bit more perfected now as opposed to those bad runs from LGB, nickel plating here has not had any issues, but I am always concerned with plating.

Perhaps the fact that the plating is on brass is a lot different than nickel on steel.

Greg
 
dunnyrail

dunnyrail

DOGS, Garden Railways, Steam Trains, Jive Dancing,
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Thanks dunnyrail. So I take it that nickel silver rail has little advantage over oxidizing brass rail and still needs regular cleaning for reliable electrical operation.
That is true to a certain extent. Some Brass will oxidise quicker than nickel silver (N/S) but in the end in the rough and tumble of the outside world for Track it tends to make little difference, though if you are a regular runner then N/S will win out on better pickup when mucky by a little.

As Greg says the plating can make a difference but that can is removed by using a Cleaning Block so in the long run the plating becomes irrelevant.
 
Greg Elmassian

Greg Elmassian

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In outdoor NS I have observed a hard, gray layer that I never saw on indoor installation. On the layouts I could get to physically, this was harder to remove than brass oxidation.

Not sure of this Jon, can you re-state?
"As Greg says the plating can make a difference but that can is removed by using a Cleaning Block so in the long run the plating becomes irrelevant. "

I read the blue part as "but that can be removed"

Cleaning blocks are NEVER used on plated track, and all purchasers are admonished of this requirement. LGB was very specific about this early on, and the current suppliers warn you no abrasive cleaning.

So, not sure what you are really trying to convey. With the much higher cost of nickel plated brass rail, I doubt anyone is ignorant of the ban on abrasive cleaning.

Greg
 
GAP

GAP

G Scale Trains, HO Trains
14 Jun 2011
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Bundaberg Queensland, Australia
In outdoor NS I have observed a hard, gray layer that I never saw on indoor installation. On the layouts I could get to physically, this was harder to remove than brass oxidation.

Not sure of this Jon, can you re-state?
"As Greg says the plating can make a difference but that can is removed by using a Cleaning Block so in the long run the plating becomes irrelevant. "

I read the blue part as "but that can be removed"

Cleaning blocks are NEVER used on plated track, and all purchasers are admonished of this requirement. LGB was very specific about this early on, and the current suppliers warn you no abrasive cleaning.

So, not sure what you are really trying to convey. With the much higher cost of nickel plated brass rail, I doubt anyone is ignorant of the ban on abrasive cleaning.

Greg
The part in blue is a possible typo? I read it the same as yourself.
 
Greg Elmassian

Greg Elmassian

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The point of my post was not to point out his spelling error, but to ask the question about the reference in that last sentence: re: cleaning block on plated track.

My questions were clearly communicated in my last 2 sentences.

Greg
 
dunnyrail

dunnyrail

DOGS, Garden Railways, Steam Trains, Jive Dancing,
25 Oct 2009
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St.Neots Cambridgeshire UK
In outdoor NS I have observed a hard, gray layer that I never saw on indoor installation. On the layouts I could get to physically, this was harder to remove than brass oxidation.

Not sure of this Jon, can you re-state?
"As Greg says the plating can make a difference but that can is removed by using a Cleaning Block so in the long run the plating becomes irrelevant. "

I read the blue part as "but that can be removed"

Cleaning blocks are NEVER used on plated track, and all purchasers are admonished of this requirement. LGB was very specific about this early on, and the current suppliers warn you no abrasive cleaning.

So, not sure what you are really trying to convey. With the much higher cost of nickel plated brass rail, I doubt anyone is ignorant of the ban on abrasive cleaning.

Greg
Hm not sure that Peco N/S was plated or not. Either way with all makes that I have the muck outside certainly needed to be cleaned off plating or not. My Track experience is with LGB, Aristo, TrainLine and Peco. Never seen a hard grey layer but certainly a dark discolouring on all types that effectively stoped reliable running. Note stopped because other than in the Shed I am all Battery Dead Rail now.

There could and probably are different atmospherics going on between US and UK also possible closeness to Sea air would make a difference. In my case my last house being closer to a busy Road and near (but not directly under) Oak trees made the Track need much more cleaning than in my current house. No close Oak Trees or busy Roads here does make a big difference. Andrew‘s line also in St.Neots was in a similar situation but somewhat closer to the A1 dual carriageway Road than me and there was a bit of a difference. Certainly his track all needed a good scrub for the summer bi-weekly running days.
 
Greg Elmassian

Greg Elmassian

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ns is usually used for solid nickel silver
stainless and brass are likewise solid
the nickel plated brass track is just that, never seen anyone plate nickel silver
and a long time ago there was some chrome plated aluminum, but short lived

the only people making nickel plated brass track that I know about was lgb, then train-li in the us imports it, might be train line 45.

Greg
 
John Russo

John Russo

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Hello all. Just joined your fantastic forum and already need help.
So have always had the good old Hornby 00 trains and finally taken the big step to “G” gauge!
I have bought myself off of eBay (no doubt off of someone who is a member of this forum), an LGB Lehmann Stainz 0-4-0 20212 no.2774. So at present I have the loco and nothing else, no track, transformer etc. A complete g gauge virgin! So to begin, I can find plenty of information on Lehmann and LGB but no manual or instructions for my little loco. I think it’s one of the more modern ones with the round speaker in the roof, but am unsure if it has a smoke system? As no switch underneath at front. Looking down the funnel it looks like a smoke gen, but not sure. There is a three position switch at the fire door in cab. It’s also missing it’s driver which I would like to replace.
so any help with instructions on what to buy (track, starter kits, spares, transformer, etc) and pdf manual would be massively appreciated.
Dan.

Here are some manuals that should be good for your loco.

You can use google translate to better understand the web page.

There are many variation of the Stainz but he basis are all the same.

LGB Stainz Version 2 - FGB-Berlin


Translated form the page: This locomotive was produced under the following article numbers:
20211, 20213, 21211, 22211, 23211, 26211, 27211 and identical,
as well as from the starter sets 70302, 70304, 70402, 70403 and identical
 
Rhinochugger

Rhinochugger

Retired Oik (IBT)
27 Oct 2009
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North West Norfolk
ns is usually used for solid nickel silver
stainless and brass are likewise solid
the nickel plated brass track is just that, never seen anyone plate nickel silver
and a long time ago there was some chrome plated aluminum, but short lived

the only people making nickel plated brass track that I know about was lgb, then train-li in the us imports it, might be train line 45.

Greg
Yep, I was going to say that Peco nickel silver track is solid, and can be cleaned with the Peco abrasive cleaner (although size-wise it is designed for the smaller gauges) - interesting about the nickel plated brass; I didn't know that such a thing had been made and I'm not really sure that I see the point of it as nickel attracts crud just the same as brass :nod::nod:
 
John Russo

John Russo

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John Russo

John Russo

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Here are smoke stack replacements. The picture does not show the entire unit.

Is simply unscrews from the loco by turning it counter-clockwise. (Anti-clockwise if the Atlantic Ocean is to your West).

However, like others posted, unless you have the metal contact at the bottom to provide current, it will not do anything. You could wire it yourself if you cared to.

LGB 65103 Standard Smoke Stack, 18 volt

and

LGB 65203 Balloon Smoke Stack 18 Volt
 
Last edited:
dunnyrail

dunnyrail

DOGS, Garden Railways, Steam Trains, Jive Dancing,
25 Oct 2009
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796
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St.Neots Cambridgeshire UK
Yep, I was going to say that Peco nickel silver track is solid, and can be cleaned with the Peco abrasive cleaner (although size-wise it is designed for the smaller gauges) - interesting about the nickel plated brass; I didn't know that such a thing had been made and I'm not really sure that I see the point of it as nickel attracts crud just the same as brass :nod::nod:
I would never even consider the Peco abrasive cleaners for our scale, just too small. My cleaner of choice is the good old LGB cleaning block 50040. I have around 4 of the things littered around my Sheds including the original one that I bought back in 1983 or 84, it has had a new Massoth abrasive pad but is still the same one. The top storage area on these is a great place for keeping spare fishplates as well, though they Rattle a bit when you are track cleaning.
 
Greg Elmassian

Greg Elmassian

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The point of Nickel plated brass is that nickel does not oxidize as brass does, so there is no oxide removal needed. A wet cloth or wipe will remove dust, dirt, sap.

Given many things, it is one of the best for outdoor track power, but expensive, and the plating seems good so far, having been sold for a number of years now.

Nickel-silver track is completely different, and I have not seen a clear advantage over brass outdoors, except it weathers more to the color of steel than the yellow brass.

For ease of maintenance in track powered layouts, nickel-plated brass and solid stainless are tops, never oxidizes. I prefer stainless as it is cheaper, and if I need to grind on the rails at points or matching joints, I don't have to worry about grinding off a plating.

Greg