G SCALE DOODLEBUG WANTED

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Brixham

Brixham

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27 Aug 2010
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Maybe it was batteryfied, then reverted back to track power. The headlight works
 
Brixham

Brixham

Registered
27 Aug 2010
1,138
2
I think I said Hermes around £10..but needs an insurance top up from £25 cover
 
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Brixham

Brixham

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27 Aug 2010
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At the driver end, you can see the screw for the marker lights, plus a small hole for the wires to the lights. Both couplings removed, I had half thought about finding another and running them back to back, so cabs would be outermost.
But far too much to do, let alone run trains!
 
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paul delany

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30 Mar 2018
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Dublin Ireland
At the driver end, you can see the screw for the marker lights, plus a small hole for the wires to the lights. Both couplings removed, I had half thought about finding another and running them back to back, so cabs would be outermost.
But far too much to do, let alone run trains!
 
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paul delany

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30 Mar 2018
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Indeed we are all in the same boat,have to make a living,what do I owe ye including postage dude
 
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Fred Mills

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27 Mar 2017
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Ottawa/Nepean, Ontario Canada
Those missing lights on the front corners of that railcar, are NOT marker lights. They are "Classification lights". "Marker lights" would be on the rear corners of the car. (Red)
Classification lights would indicate (White) that the car was running as an extra train, not on the timetable, or (Green) that it was a second section of a train on the timetable. They would not be on, if it was in normal service as a train on the timetable.
This is of course, by North American operating rules
I offer this information, just in case anyone cares...
Fred Mills
 
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PhilP

PhilP

G Scale, 7/8th's, Electronics
5 Jun 2013
23,213
411
Tamworth, Staffs.
Those missing lights on the front corners of that railcar, are NOT marker lights. They are "Classification lights". "Marker lights" would be on the rear corners of the car. (Red)
Classification lights would indicate (White) that the car was running as an extra train, not on the timetable, or (Green) that it was a second section of a train on the timetable. They would not be on, if it was in normal service as a train on the timetable.
This is of course, by North American operating rules
I offer this information, just in case anyone cares...
Fred Mills
Care? - Well, maybe..
Interested? - Definitely, thank you for the information..

Can you elucidate whether the red/green lights on the USA Trains models, are anything like prototypical? - Except, I assume, in their position?
Thanks,
PhilP.
 
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paul delany

Registered
30 Mar 2018
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52
Dublin Ireland
At the driver end, you can see the screw for the marker lights, plus a small hole for the wires to the lights. Both couplings removed, I had half thought about finding another and running them back to back, so cabs would be outermost.
But far too much to do, let alone run trains!
Hi good morning just wondering how soon you can get the bug in the post for me ,as I need to get it here before start of August as wifey is coming home
 
Greg Elmassian

Greg Elmassian

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8 Mar 2014
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San Diego
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We do care Fred, thank you.

The USA Trains practice of red/green lights in the locations that would normally be classification lights is flawed, as classification lights were normally off, green or white, matching the locations and colors of the flags used on steam locos.

Diesels typically had a red light somewhere to be used on the rear of a loco or set of locos that was not pulling a train, i.e. having a caboose with a red light or a blinking red "fred" device in the coupler of the last car.

On diesels often a small red light was somewhere in the headlight shell, often offset down and very hard to find a picture of this.

Greg
 
PhilP

PhilP

G Scale, 7/8th's, Electronics
5 Jun 2013
23,213
411
Tamworth, Staffs.
Thanks Greg..