Weathering product that can be removed.

Z

zman50

Registered
22 Feb 2019
38
1
63
Wisconsin
I am thinking about trying my hand at some weathering on a LGB boxcar. I would like to know if there is a product that can be put on and then later washed off with some soapy warm water, and the plastic will be back to new looking. Thanks in advance for any help and advice you all give.
 
PhilP

PhilP

G Scale, 7/8th's, Electronics
5 Jun 2013
23,179
405
Tamworth, Staffs.
I would try artist's chalk's...
<Greg posted as I was typing / dozing..>
 
Zerogee

Zerogee

Clencher's Bogleman
25 Oct 2009
16,711
149
North Essex
Agree with both Greg and Phil - weathering chalks are normally fixed with a topcoat of something clear to STOP them washing/wiping off in use, so if you don't do that then they should come off just fine when you actually need them to....

Jon.
 
dunnyrail

dunnyrail

DOGS, Garden Railways, Steam Trains, Jive Dancing,
25 Oct 2009
14,812
344
71
St.Neots Cambridgeshire UK
they should come off just fine when you actually need them to....

Jon.
Especially your fingers when you put them on and off the Track!
 
beavercreek

beavercreek

Travel, Art, Theatre, Music, Photography, Trains
24 Oct 2009
17,361
57
East Anglia
www.facebook.com
Chalks, pastels and weathering powders..even tempura powder paint...I have even used fine dust from very dry earth/clay.... All will just wash way without a topcoat of matt varnish.
It is a great way of practicing how to weather.
Just remember that if you are practicing on any motorised (loco etc ) or stock that has lighting wiring etc, to be careful when washing off the weathering. Use a nice large soft brush like a make-up brush etc.
 
P

Paradise

Registered
28 Jan 2010
654
58
Soft art pastels won't rub off as quick as chalks.
They come in earthy colours and you can buy them separately.
Pan pastels look interesting because you can apply them with a brush etc.
 
beavercreek

beavercreek

Travel, Art, Theatre, Music, Photography, Trains
24 Oct 2009
17,361
57
East Anglia
www.facebook.com
Just remember that what ever powder, pastel, dust, etc you use, if you do decide to seal it with a matt varnish coat, the effect will be knocked back and seem to partially disappear... in fact dust and chalk disappear the most.
The good thing is to see how much seemingly disappears and then apply a little more and then a thin coat of varnish and perhaps a little more.
This way you can build up the levels and use different hues to give a more realistic effect.