wagon turntable

Paul2727

Paul2727

Registered
5 Jun 2018
314
England
Hi all,
I'm thinking about building a couple of wagon turntables from LGB 90 degree crossings. Has any build a wagon turntable in 45mm? Also how were the capstans placed?
Regards,
Paul.
 
P

Paul M

Registered
25 Oct 2016
5,315
57
Royston
Also how were the capstans placed?


I thought wagon turntables tended to manually pushed
 
ebay mike

ebay mike

Retired, but still hoarding. (GOF)
6 Dec 2011
3,292
Norfolk - edge of nowhere.
Hi all,
I'm thinking about building a couple of wagon turntables from LGB 90 degree crossings. Has any build a wagon turntable in 45mm? Also how were the capstans placed?
Regards,
Paul.
How long do you intend the tracks to be? Don't forget the crossing geometry isn't symmetrical - one 'leg' is shorter than the other three.
 
musket the dog

musket the dog

Professional engineer, amateur modeler
31 Oct 2009
645
Leicester
nlrr.webs.com
It might not come with the same sense of accomplishment as making your own from the LGB crossings but Swift Sixteen sell a resin kit to make one. I don't own one of the turn tables, but I've had a few pieces off of Swift Sixteen and the mouldings have always been of excellent quality and very robust.

Wagon Turntable

As for the Capstans, would it be one at the end of each siding you intend to draw the wagon in to, and its opposite on the other side of the turn table but with enough clearance to drive a wagon past?
 
Paul2727

Paul2727

Registered
5 Jun 2018
314
England
How long do you intend the tracks to be? Don't forget the crossing geometry isn't symmetrical - one 'leg' is shorter than the other three.
Basically to take a feldbahn sized wagon. So all the legs would be cut down to fit within a circle of that size. The remaining part of the crossing would then glued to the pivoting turntable bed and infilled where practical. A matching ring would be produced with exit / entrance tracks cut to suit.
while most wagons were pushed manually on / off these little turntables, capstans were often used in conjunction with rope or chain to allow horses or locomotives to pull the wagons at ninety degrees to the main track.
 
Paul2727

Paul2727

Registered
5 Jun 2018
314
England
It might not come with the same sense of accomplishment as making your own from the LGB crossings but Swift Sixteen sell a resin kit to make one. I don't own one of the turn tables, but I've had a few pieces off of Swift Sixteen and the mouldings have always been of excellent quality and very robust.
A lovely looking thing, but appears to have non conductive rails. I'm hoping to be able to run track powered locos over mine.
Paul.
 
ebay mike

ebay mike

Retired, but still hoarding. (GOF)
6 Dec 2011
3,292
Norfolk - edge of nowhere.
A lovely looking thing, but appears to have non conductive rails. I'm hoping to be able to run track powered locos over mine.
Paul.
Paul, I did have an Aristocraft 90° crossing, but I think it was either nickel silver or stainless steel finish. If I still have it would it be an option for you? That one had equal length tracks.
 
Gizzy

Gizzy

A gentleman, a scholar, and a railway modeller....
26 Oct 2009
33,526
59
Cambridgeshire
www.gscalecentral.net
Hi all,
I'm thinking about building a couple of wagon turntables from LGB 90 degree crossings. Has any build a wagon turntable in 45mm? Also how were the capstans placed?
Regards,
Paul.
I sold one to Steve (Fun & Trains) recently, and from what I remember, the longer road had a longer base section too, so this might not be viable. I was going to cut mine down for a scissors crossing....
 
ebay mike

ebay mike

Retired, but still hoarding. (GOF)
6 Dec 2011
3,292
Norfolk - edge of nowhere.
Paul, I did have an Aristocraft 90° crossing, but I think it was either nickel silver or stainless steel finish. If I still have it would it be an option for you? That one had equal length tracks.
Update.
I knew I had one somewhere. Not sure if the insulated section would be too long for your purposes, but it would save you having to cut any rails. Only got one though.
 

Attachments

Nodrog1826

Nodrog1826

Professional Idiot
21 Nov 2013
7,870
United Kingdom
A lovely looking thing, but appears to have non conductive rails. I'm hoping to be able to run track powered locos over mine.
Paul.
Daft suggestion, copper foil tape could be used to cover the rails and make them conductive, it's done with lego plastic RC track to convert it to the 9v version.

 
Paul2727

Paul2727

Registered
5 Jun 2018
314
England
Update.
I knew I had one somewhere. Not sure if the insulated section would be too long for your purposes, but it would save you having to cut any rails. Only got one though.
Thanks Mike,
That's a nice crossing. However the inner 'rails' on the Aristo ones are non conductive as opposed to the LGB ones. (Which I have several of.)
This may be a problem for my short wheelbase 0-4-0 track powered locos.
Track cutting is not a problem as I have some very good hss hole cutters upto 30 m which use a central drill for location.
It should be just a case of mounting the crossing onto a suitable board, clamping another identical board underneath, drilling a centre through them all and then following through with the hole cutter. In theory this should leave me with a turntable base an outer ring and all rail ends with a gap the thickness of the cutting blade (1 mm.)
It all depends how they are connected electrically if I'll have to rewire the crossing.
That said I shall keep your offer in mind, if the LGB ones turn out to be unsuitable.
Regards,
Paul. LGB-13100-CROSSING-90-degree-TRACK.jpg
 
dunnyrail

dunnyrail

DOGS, Garden Railways, Steam Trains, Jive Dancing,
25 Oct 2009
17,867
72
St.Neots Cambridgeshire UK
Daft suggestion, copper foil tape could be used to cover the rails and make them conductive, it's done with lego plastic RC track to convert it to the 9v version.

Copper tape is a great resource and should be perfectly adequate for low use locations. It is also great for running wires in the i sides of buildings to solder bulbs of Leds to. Available at some Model Shops but you will always find it in a Dolls House Shop.
 
Paul2727

Paul2727

Registered
5 Jun 2018
314
England
Interesting...
May have to experiment.
Thanks,
Paul.
 
Northsider

Northsider

Registered
3 May 2012
823
Thanks Mike,
That's a nice crossing. However the inner 'rails' on the Aristo ones are non conductive as opposed to the LGB ones. (Which I have several of.)
This may be a problem for my short wheelbase 0-4-0 track powered locos.
Track cutting is not a problem as I have some very good hss hole cutters upto 30 m which use a central drill for location.
It should be just a case of mounting the crossing onto a suitable board, clamping another identical board underneath, drilling a centre through them all and then following through with the hole cutter. In theory this should leave me with a turntable base an outer ring and all rail ends with a gap the thickness of the cutting blade (1 mm.)
It all depends how they are connected electrically if I'll have to rewire the crossing.
That said I shall keep your offer in mind, if the LGB ones turn out to be unsuitable.
Regards,
Paul. View attachment 271173
I'd have a test cut first: hole saws tend to be for use on wood, not metal. Ideally you would have three teeth in contact with the rail head (and bear in mind the web will be thinner, so you may need an even finer-toothed blade to stop it jamming in the gullet). A standard hacksaw blade is usually 18 or 24 teeth per inch, ie with approx a 1mm pitch.
 
Rhinochugger

Rhinochugger

Retired Oik
27 Oct 2009
28,252
North West Norfolk
A lovely looking thing, but appears to have non conductive rails. I'm hoping to be able to run track powered locos over mine.
Paul.
At £20, and with it being stated as having a rail height 3mm below normal G scale track, how difficult would it be to cut out the moulded rail and insert some metal rails - even a length of code 200 (Peco) might work :think::think:
 
Paul2727

Paul2727

Registered
5 Jun 2018
314
England
I'd have a test cut first: hole saws tend to be for use on wood, not metal. Ideally you would have three teeth in contact with the rail head (and bear in mind the web will be thinner, so you may need an even finer-toothed blade to stop it jamming in the gullet). A standard hacksaw blade is usually 18 or 24 teeth per inch, ie with approx a 1mm pitch.
My Starrett Bi-Metal Hole Saws contains an extra cobalt HSS tooth material for enhanced heat and wear resistance.
Featuring 26 TPI positive rake tooth design, ensuring a smoother cut. they are designed to cut stainless steel, metals and mild steel sheet. Will also cut through wood, plastic, plaster and bone. (Don't ask about the last one :devil:!)
 
Northsider

Northsider

Registered
3 May 2012
823
My Starrett Bi-Metal Hole Saws contains an extra cobalt HSS tooth material for enhanced heat and wear resistance.
Featuring 26 TPI positive rake tooth design, ensuring a smoother cut. they are designed to cut stainless steel, metals and mild steel sheet. Will also cut through wood, plastic, plaster and bone. (Don't ask about the last one :devil:!)
26 tpi? That'll do nicely, sir! :D