Tram Vs Train

Mobi

Mobi

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In what way a tram is different from a train?

A tram is still a loco with some aesthetics difference - isn't it?
 
Rhinochugger

Rhinochugger

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I suppose the simple difference is that the tram is local. The tram comes to you, you have to go to the train.

Therefore the technical solution is that the tram is lower speed, tight radius (which will affect wheel profile) and low floor. The train is higher speed, much wider radius curves, and has, in many countries, platforms for access to carriage floor level.
 
Gizzy

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In the UK, the difference between a tramway and a railway, is that the railway is fenced in....
 
Rhinochugger

Rhinochugger

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Mmmmm, we had a few trains that ran on public highways as well, and that weren't fenced in - Weymouth, Bristol, Cardiff

OK, under controlled conditions I accept :smirk::smirk:
 
PhilP

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Mobi

Mobi

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I was talking of differences from garden railway perspective and not from real world view :)
 
pugwash

pugwash

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I was talking of differences from garden railway perspective and not from real world view :)
I think from your original question do you mean the difference between a tram loco (for example the Fiery Elias) and a self contained tram?
 
Mobi

Mobi

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Kind of. From Garden Railway perspective I think a tram is still a loco with same motor. Only the look & feel of the loco is different for tram.

You can still pull few coaches using tram as normal loco and I doubt if it fails to pull anything but just one coach.
 
stevelewis

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my LGB 4wl trams will pull 3 or 4 coaches easily on the flat and on reasonable gradients
The LGB USA 'Streetcar' will pull quite a lot! one of mine has a coupling fitted ** and will pull 3 heavy bogie coaches up my approx 1 in 25 gradiant to the garage.

Should be pointed out that both the 4wl trams & Bogie streetcars are not fitted with traction tyres.
the USA street car has 2 powered bogies.
NOTE** the streetcars do not have couplings fitted as in reality they run on their own
But I bet someone somewhere has a pic which shows differentl!!
 
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Miamigo259

Miamigo259

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But I bet someone somewhere has a pic which shows differentl!!

Happy to oblige..............!!

The Adelaide-Glenelg ones ran as coupled pairs in peak hours (here in 2004)

4-163.JPG

and US interurbans (admittedly a bit more "heavy rail" than our concept of tramways) ran in multiple , like this preserved North Shore Line pair at Union, IL

11-1333.JPG
 
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Rhinochugger

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Some interrurbans ran up to 4-car units - the Pacific Electric
 
Miamigo259

Miamigo259

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Some interrurbans ran up to 4-car units - the Pacific Electric
Not forgetting the South Shore Line out of Chicago which still manages to confound unsuspecting motorists in Michigan City, Indiana, with 8-car trains of their current rolling stock running through the streets at peak hours...........!
(It's an interesting experience driving alongside them at 25 mph....)

13-755.jpg
 
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stevelewis

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009.JPG
Happy to oblige..............!!

The Adelaide-Glenelg ones ran as coupled pairs in peak hours (here in 2004)

View attachment 203463

and US interurbans (admittedly a bit more "heavy rail" than our concept of tramways) ran in multiple , like this preserved North Shore Line pair at Union, IL

View attachment 203464
AH Brilliant I was not getting too far-fetched then fitting single arm Pantograph to one of mine!!
 
trammayo

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When is a tramway not a tramway? When it's a lIght Railway! (in the UK that is). Many tramways had locomotives for hauling goods stock. Hull & Marfleet (I seem to think) had multiple trailers for passengers hauled by one tram engine. - as did the Swansea & Mumbles. Trams usually were allowed to travel at much higher speeds on segregated light railways. Then again, the Burton & Ashby had narrow gauge open-top double deckers as a railway. And tramways preceded railways. All is not what it seems.
 
Lobethalbahn2

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Happy to oblige..............!!

The Adelaide-Glenelg ones ran as coupled pairs in peak hours (here in 2004)

View attachment 203463
The Adelaide H Class trams could operate as 2, 3 or 4-car sets, although 3 and 4 car sets were uncommon in the last few decades of their life. They were coupled as 4-car sets primarily on race days at Morphettville racecourse to transport the large number of racegoers (especially in the 1920s/1930s), and sometimes in peak hours. The Adelaide trams also pulled horseboxes to transport horses to Morphettville.

 
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T

Trainman 864

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I don't think there is a definitive test to determine the difference as far as the vehicle itself is cocerned - but my understanding has always been that - because of the increased danger associated with running in close proximity to humans and small animals - the main feature of a tram as distinct from a locomotive is the extra eclosure of the running gear which can amount to all round skirting.

 
Miamigo259

Miamigo259

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I don't think there is a definitive test to determine the difference as far as the vehicle itself is cocerned - but my understanding has always been that - because of the increased danger associated with running in close proximity to humans and small animals - the main feature of a tram as distinct from a locomotive is the extra eclosure of the running gear which can amount to all round skirting.
The East Anglian dockside rail lines (Ipswich, Yarmouth & Lowestoft) were all classed as Tramways, so locos that worked on them were supposed to have totally enclosed motion and be fitted with a warning bell.
The GER had a fleet of tram locos to work these lines and these lasted up to the 1950's when diesels replaced them, Ipswich actually having three 0-4-0 Hunslet diesels specifically for the tight radius curves around the original 1846 built "wet dock"
scan0001.jpg
By the early 1970's, something appeared to change as regards the regulations, so locos with exposed running gear then became the norm until the lines were closed.

81-386.JPG
I know that "unskirted" locos did certainly get onto Ipswich Docks prior to this as there are a number of photos around showing them there, including a J67 (I think...) running as a 2-4-0T to enable it to get around some of the curves!
 
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stockers

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The 'Mollie' at Bad Doberan in Germany started life as a tram way with skirted tram locos. As traffic demanded more powerful locos the skirted idea seemed to disappear.
DSC04194 (Small).JPG DSC04200 (Small).JPG
 
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