The Dummies Guide. - Cv's - Massoth

stockers

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CV58 - Pause time when changing direction.

Value 0-255
Default 0

Program a pause between a change of direction (saves gear wear). 1/2 second per 1 value. Great for kids use.
 
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CV59 - Switch speed (half speed)

Value 0-16
Default 8 (function key 8)

Reduces the speed in all speed steps for shunting maneuvers when the F key is pressed. Press again for return to full speed.
Can be allocated to any F key 1-16, 0 is off.
 
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CV60, 61, 62, 63, 64.- PI Load Control.

PI = proportional integral - what ever that might mean!

Load control governs the speed of the loco regardless of hills or the weight of the train. The decoder will deliver more voltage to the motor if it notices the load on the motor increase.

CV60 is the re-adjustment factor. Basically, it is the degree of the re-adjustment to a change in load. If this value is too high the re-adjustment will be too much and the loco will become jerky. Default 2. (I would suggest any changes are made very gradually)

CV61 is the frequency that CV60 makes an adjustment. The default value is 60.
An XLS decoder can make 4000 adjustment a second. Divide 4000 by the CV setting = number of adjustment per second.

CV62 is a slightly tricky one. In simple terms this CV can limit the maximum voltage sent to the motor. This could be used to limit the top speed of a loco or to reduce the upper end speed (under load). This can be used to good effect because all real locos are limited in their power output. Also, this could be used to protect a motor that has a maximum voltage that is less than your central station output.
Value 255 is no limits, Value 1 - 254 is fast to slow limitation. Default 255.

CV63 controls the load control at low speeds. It desensitises load control at lower (slower) speed steps to help with shunting etc. where an automated change in speed may not be wanted. The default is 60. The maths to calculate what is happening is complex and that's all I am saying!

CV64 allocates a function key (Default 16) to switch this function on/off. Value 1-16. Value 0 is off.

If you are double heading it may be necessary to switch load control off because the push/pull of the second loco can confuse the decoder and the voltage output changes dramatically making the locos buck against each other.

This whole section is selectable/deselectable in CV49
 
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CVs 67 to 94 - Programmable driving curve in 28 speed steps.

Default 1 - 255

This function is switchable in CV29, bit 4 (value 16 for on, 0 for off).

If selected in CV29, this range of CVs enable you to create your own sequence of speed steps. You can have your loco accelerate quickly through a few early steps and have greater control of the top end or the reverse for shunting maneuvers. Or anything else that takes your fancy.
Defaults are. CV67 = 6, 68 = 8, 69 = 10, 70 = 13, 71 = 16, 72 = 19, 73 = 22, 74 = 26, 75 = 31, 76 = 36, 77 = 42, 78 = 48, 79 = 54, 80 = 60, 81 = 68, 82 = 76, 83 = 84, 84 = 92, 85 = 102, 86 = 112, 87 = 124, 88 = 136, 89 = 152, 90 = 168, 91 = 188, 92 = 208, 93 = 228, 94 = 232.

These settings will not 'reset' with the reset command - CV 7.

Note that CV94 is not set to the maximum value of 255 (see CV5 for reason)
 
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CV121 and 123. Switching function (key) for F7 and F8

Value 0 -16 = Function keys on controller.

Default, CV121 = 13, CV123 = 14.
 
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CV124, 125, 126, 127. - RC servo control on F7.

CV124.
Value 0 = No special function. F7 is purely an on/off switch.
Value 1 = RC servo operation with two end positions with on or off.
Value +4 = Inverse servo operation (if supported by servo)
Value +8 = The control signal to the servo is switched off after motion.

CV125.
Servo lower end position of movement.
Default 16
Range 5-50

CV126.
Servo upper end position of movement.
Default 32
Range 5-50

CV127.
Servo turning velocity.
Default 1
Range 1-15 (1 is fastest)

These controls are also dependent on the servo being able to understand them.
 
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CV129 - Time lag with power buffer in digital operation

Default 0
Range 2 - 255

CV130 - Time lag with power buffer in analogue operation

Default 0
Range 2-255

These CVs will control how long a power buffer will continue to power a loco for. See your documentation with the power buffer.
Massoth suggest this only works with their 'Goldcap Buffer'.
 
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stockers

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CV7, 8, 105, 106. Read Only CVs

These CVs are read only, they give information about the decoder

CV7 is an odd ball. Value 22 gives the 'Read Only' read out but other values reset the decoder - see CV7 Post 12
 
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G

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CV57, 114, 116, 120.
Expanded special functions for F2, F3, F4, F6

Default 0

An additional value of 16 to CV57 will link F2 with F1 for alternating flashing of lights.
An additional value of 16 to CV116 will link F4 with F3 for alternating flashing lights.
An additional value of 16 to CV120 will link F6 with F5 for alternating flashing lights.
An additional value of 30 to CV114 will give an electrical pulse simulation for pulsed smoke generators in the absence of a sensor. (Not for use with axle sensors - follow the instructions with your sensor)
An additional value of 31 to CV116 gives control of charging for a power buffer in programming mode. (Power buffers interfere with programming) F4 can be used to turn off the charging. Check with your power buffer documentation - I have never done anything in this area so you are on your own.
Is there not a simple instruction booklet for DCC (LGB or Massoth)?
 
idlemarvel

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There are many booklets g.o.m. it depends what you want to know.
Not wishing to avoid the question, DCC is a broad topic, there are many books written about it.
If you could be more specific we can probably help.
For example, do you want to know the configuration variables (CVs) for a particular decoder?
Do you want to know how to program a decoder with a specific command/central station setup?
Etc.
 
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Simple answer - no. And whilst many CVs are used similarly, many others are used very differently by different manufacturers.
 
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Greg Elmassian

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I find the first hurdle is to get the binary math down, and I either explain it, or point them to a binary to decimal converter.

After that point, unfortunately, you have to read the manuals for all the non-standard stuff.

Or, you can get a software like JMRI (free) that is a nice menu driven system and helps you in English to accomplish what you want.

And some of the more expensive DCC systems help you along somewhat.

Greg
 
R

RH Prague

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Morning all. As a beginner in digital I was reading in another thread about using a CV to check on which chip is in a loco. That is something I would like to do. However this thread does not, as far as I can tell, explain to a complete beginner how you access CVs - any CVs. Is it possible to get a quick tutorial here from someone? From the standpoint of someone who has his Massoth Navigator in his hand, but thus far has only used the keyboard buttons for basic configuration and activating sounds?

I thank you in advance!
 
PhilP

PhilP

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I will allow someone with a Navigator in front of them to answer the specific question..

However,
Post 12, and other mentions of CV 7... Never mention reading the value that is in it, and it is quite fundamental really..
The value returned when you read CV 7 will give you the manufacturer of the decoder. So for a LGB/Massoth decoder , you will get '123' when you read the value of CV7.

https://www.nmra.org/manufacturer-id-numbers
 
stockers

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Morning all. As a beginner in digital I was reading in another thread about using a CV to check on which chip is in a loco. That is something I would like to do. However this thread does not, as far as I can tell, explain to a complete beginner how you access CVs - any CVs. Is it possible to get a quick tutorial here from someone? From the standpoint of someone who has his Massoth Navigator in his hand, but thus far has only used the keyboard buttons for basic configuration and activating sounds?

I thank you in advance!
Post No.1 states clearly that this thread is NOT a 'HOW TO'.
When I prepared this thread I was anticipating someone else coming along with a 'USERS THREAD'. Has not happened yet.
 
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John S

John S

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Morning all. As a beginner in digital I was reading in another thread about using a CV to check on which chip is in a loco. That is something I would like to do. However this thread does not, as far as I can tell, explain to a complete beginner how you access CVs - any CVs. Is it possible to get a quick tutorial here from someone? From the standpoint of someone who has his Massoth Navigator in his hand, but thus far has only used the keyboard buttons for basic configuration and activating sounds?

I thank you in advance!
I’m in France at the moment, somewhere on a post that I answerd for slawman I did start to explain the fundamentals, hopefully a kind sole back home in Blighty can find it at send a link to RH Prague, thanks.
 
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idlemarvel

idlemarvel

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I will allow someone with a Navigator in front of them to answer the specific question..

However,
Post 12, and other mentions of CV 7... Never mention reading the value that is in it, and it is quite fundamental really..
The value returned when you read CV 7 will give you the manufacturer of the decoder. So for a LGB/Massoth decoder , you will get '123' when you read the value of CV7.

https://www.nmra.org/manufacturer-id-numbers
CV8 is the manufacturer's code, CV7 is usually version number.
 
Alpineandy

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I have just spent last 2 hours programming a newly fitted xl decoder an I walks in, turns on my puter and sees this..............................
Could ave programmed it in 10 mins.....................c'est la bl**dy vie..................:mad:
 
idlemarvel

idlemarvel

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I have just spent last 2 hours programming a newly fitted xl decoder an I walks in, turns on my puter and sees this..............................
Could ave programmed it in 10 mins.....................c'est la bl**dy vie..................:mad:
Sees what? A line of dots? :)
 
LGB333

LGB333

Active Member
Following various threads on this esteemed forum I will start the dummies guide to digital.
This thread deals with CVs only and Massoth only. I am sure most of the information can cross over to other makes but lets keep it simple.
This thread is about CVs, for Massoth - not about HOW to change them or WHAT KIT to use. Hopefully, other threads will deal with that. It is based on the XLS decoder but I think most of it is relevant to all Massoth decoders. Please note, other manufacturers use some CVs differently.
This thread WILL BE HEAVILY MODERATED to keep it as clear and simple as practical, it may also get locked from time to time. Please feel free to add you 2 pennys worth but don't be disappointed when it is plagiarised or just deleted.
Also - I can make mistakes!

It has been suggested that I indicate the voltage levels associated with various CV values, also the degree of effect that a change would have. A laudable idea but to be honest I don't have much of a clue. I do all my adjustments by trial and error or by copying something similar. What I would say is, remember the original settings and go slowly - a small change can make a marked difference.
+++++++++++++++++++
Stockers - Very nice job.......you put a lot of time and effort into these postings. I've been a DCC/Digital system user now for almost four years after having used DC/Analog for 27 years........love it now. My first Central Station Piko, made by Massoth, and now also the Massoth Central Station. I've reset several of my Massoth decoders with no problems. Folks should also remember that if a Massoth decoder becomes defective, you can ship it back to the Massoth folks in Germany for free repair or replacement under their 12 month warranty coverage. I did so with one of mine and they fixed it and shipped it back to me within 30 days. Shipping such a small item is cheap using USPS First Class Package International. One caution I'd like to also warn people about is programming a Massoth decoder, or probably any decoder, in a locomotive that also contains another function decoder installed, such as a Phoenix sound unit. I recently installed Massoth eMotion XL power decoders into a person's LGB F7A and F7B Diesel units and also his furnished Phoenix unit. I programmed the Phoenix unit separately from the Massoth unit using the Phoenix PC Software. But the owner then tried to change the address on the Massoth units using his NCE DCC system but didn't disconnect the locomotive's power to the Phoenix decoder and messed up both the Massoth decoder in the F7A unit, but then also the Phoenix unit.
Tom
 
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