The Claptowte Railway - Open wagon conversion

David1226

David1226

Registered
24 Oct 2009
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Abingdon, Oxfordshire
This is a conversion of the LGB Toytrain low sided open wagon. This is one of the first conversions that I attempted, ten or more years ago. I have need of a second wagon of this type, so I have just converted a second, which I bought years ago, in anticipation. This has enabled me to take some photographs which I did not take the first time around.

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The process is the same as with the other conversions of Toytrain open wagons that I have carried out, the high sided tarpaulin and coal wagons. I apologise if the initial steps and photographs are, therefore, a bit repetitious, they are for the benefit of those who have not followed my previous threads. The first step is to remove the balcony railing and brake stand. The balcony planking then has to be carefully cut off.

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There is a minimum of detail to remove from the wagon body. There is a ‘blob’ on each corner presumably representing a tang for a clevis pin. On each side there is a smooth square which I assume to be a board for chalking destination and/or load details, as on the more expensive LGB model range, this is painted black. This needs to be scraped flush with the planking then scribed to match the planking and wood grain. The next stage is to carefully cut through the body alongside the strapping.

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The gaps in the deck and sides are then filled in with plasticard which is scribed to match the planking and wood grain. It is easier to do the scribing before gluing the extensions in place. The detail can now be added. A new length of channel strapping needs to be added to each side, at the join. I drill shallow holes to represent the bolt heads. Once painted, and from normal viewing distances, you cannot tell the difference. On the original sides, the strapping alternates between channel and plain. Adding an extra piece of strapping destroys this symmetry. In order to retain uniformity of appearance, I added thin strips of plasticard to the sides of the plain strapping to replicate channel. Hinges for the new strapping, and the end of the one sawn through when the body was sawn, were made up from rounded off scraps of plasticard.

I have added a photograph of the converted tarpaulin wagon as this better illustrates the alterations to the strapping.

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Going back to this conversion, I added two scribed plasticard blocks, to each side, to represent wooden stop blocks, to prevent damage if the sides get dropped on the axle guards. New, larger plasticard tangs, with holes drilled through, are added at each corner to take cotter pins with securing chains. I made a couple of strokes with the razor saw, at each corner top, to represent the fact that the sides and ends of the body are separate pieces. The axle guards are bent and filed from brass strip. There is a short 90 degree bend, at the top of each, to superglue the brass axle guard to the underside of the plastic body. I have found, over the years, that this has not worked well and they are vulnerable to being knocked off. On the new model, and retrospectively on the original, I glued a piece of plasticard on either side of the axle guard, then glued a ‘strap’ of plasticard across the back. I am hopeful that this will be much more robust. The only other addition to the body is a GRS lamp iron, each end. The chassis receives the usual plasticard brake lever, Al Kramer metal wheels, and the Claptowte Railway makers plate.

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As with all of my conversions, the biggest alteration in appearance is down to the repaint and lettering.

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The new model has yet to go to the paint shop. When completed, I will post some photographs of the two wagons together. Even though built ten, or more, years apart, I am confident, that apart from the wagon numbers, you will not be able to tell them apart.

David
 
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playmofire

Registered
23 Oct 2010
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North Yorks
Another very neat conversion.
 
PhilP

PhilP

G Scale, 7/8th's, Electronics
5 Jun 2013
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Excellent..

Where do you get your cotter pins and chain? - Having trouble sourcing anything remotely small / fine enough.
 
David1226

David1226

Registered
24 Oct 2009
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Abingdon, Oxfordshire
Where do you get your cotter pins and chain?

I have had both for years. I do not recall where I got the chain from, I used it in my O-16.5 days to secure wagon loads. I suggest you do a trawl of model accessory sites for the smaller scales, apart from brass chain you can also get it chemically blackened these days. I inherited a gross box of cotter pins from my Grandfather 43 years ago. They just went into my modelling box, I only have a few left. They were a GKN product, not sure if they are still going, size 1/2 x 3/64 inch. I am sure some one must still manufacture them, although size probably in metric by now. The length as used on the model has been shortened to suit.

David
 
PhilP

PhilP

G Scale, 7/8th's, Electronics
5 Jun 2013
26,736
2,766
Tamworth, Staffs.
I have had both for years. I do not recall where I got the chain from, I used it in my O-16.5 days to secure wagon loads. I suggest you do a trawl of model accessory sites for the smaller scales, apart from brass chain you can also get it chemically blackened these days. I inherited a gross box of cotter pins from my Grandfather 43 years ago. They just went into my modelling box, I only have a few left. They were a GKN product, not sure if they are still going, size 1/2 x 3/64 inch. I am sure some one must still manufacture them, although size probably in metric by now. The length as used on the model has been shortened to suit.

David
Thanks David.
 
David1226

David1226

Registered
24 Oct 2009
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Abingdon, Oxfordshire
I have had both for years. I do not recall where I got the chain from, I used it in my O-16.5 days to secure wagon loads. I suggest you do a trawl of model accessory sites for the smaller scales, apart from brass chain you can also get it chemically blackened these days. I inherited a gross box of cotter pins from my Grandfather 43 years ago. They just went into my modelling box, I only have a few left. They were a GKN product, not sure if they are still going, size 1/2 x 3/64 inch. I am sure some one must still manufacture them, although size probably in metric by now. The length as used on the model has been shortened to suit.

David

Since making the above reply, I had a look on Ebay. Put in 'cotter pins' and there are literally hundreds of suppliers supplying them as small as 10 x 1 mm in stainless steel. Put in 'brass chain' and again there are hundreds of suppliers of chain, as fine as you like and in several styles and finishes. It is sold by the metre for jewellry makers. All as cheap as chips. Why have string of your railway crane wagons when you can have antique bronze finish chain....? I know what I'm changing to.

David
 
David1226

David1226

Registered
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Abingdon, Oxfordshire
Number 7 now out of the paint shop and finished. Shown in the garden with number 5. There are more than 10 years between the two conversions.

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David
 
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Riograndad

Riograndad

Model Railroading, boats and oil painting,
6 Jul 2013
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Northampton UK
Very very smart,great conversions,reminds me reading this ,I must get one of those saws,normally try and do similar jobs with a sharp knife,not a good idea :'( :'(
 
David1226

David1226

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Abingdon, Oxfordshire
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38thfoot

Grand dreams; limited talent
19 Nov 2013
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15
Hazel Grove, S Manchester
Old thread I know but what thickness plasticard are you using?

38
 
David1226

David1226

Registered
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Abingdon, Oxfordshire
Old thread I know but what thickness plasticard are you using?

38

I honestly cannot remember, I had a variety of thicknesses and used whichever matched with the original body floor/side thickness, I would guess mainly 2.0mm.

David
 
dunnyrail

dunnyrail

DOGS, Garden Railways, Steam Trains, Jive Dancing,
25 Oct 2009
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St.Neots Cambridgeshire UK
Excellent..

Where do you get your cotter pins and chain? - Having trouble sourcing anything remotely small / fine enough.
Eileens Emporium do fairly small cotter pins, they call them brass split pins 1/32 x 3/8. Another source for perhaps smaller ones is some suppliers sell small ones as handrail knobs for 00 gauge. Small chain may be available from Eileen but others especially model ship parts suppliers are a good source for chain.
 
ge_rik

ge_rik

British narrow gauge (esp. Southwold and W&LLR)
24 Oct 2009
9,891
1,067
Cheshire
www.riksrailway.blogspot.com
Another great conversion, David, well described.

Rik
 
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Paul M

Registered
25 Oct 2016
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Royston
Small chain may be available from Eileen but others especially model ship parts suppliers are a good source for chain.
Try costume jewellery, especially cheaper bits, the chain is ideal and rusts to perfection
 
David1226

David1226

Registered
24 Oct 2009
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Abingdon, Oxfordshire
Having created these low sided wagons some years ago, I never got around to creating any freight for them to carry. I now have one loaded with a pair of large packing crates. It is worth clicking on the link below to see how and why these crates were created.
Claptowte Railway - Large packing Crates - G Scale Central

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David