Temporary way

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RMurphy195

Registered
2 Feb 2020
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Birmingham, UK
As opposed to permanent way!

Having fun using my new brunel on its oval of MSS track, but the lawn isn't flat, and it gets a bit tedious assembling the track then getting it up again. And I'm not yet of a mind to undertake a building project for something permanent.

The obvious solution is to attach the track to a board, then simply lift the board (in sections if I can find a way of doing it without removing the tabs from some of the track sections) and stand them against a wall - possibly outdoors.

Anyone done this? And if so what sort of materials did you use

Thanks - Richard
 
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Paul M

Registered
25 Oct 2016
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Royston
It'll be just like building a small gauge portable layout, only larger and with weather proof materials.
 
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playmofire

Registered
23 Oct 2010
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North Yorks
The obvious solution is to attach the track to a board, then simply lift the board (in sections if I can find a way of doing it without removing the tabs from some of the track sections) and stand them against a wall - possibly outdoors.
If you arrange it so that each panel starts and ends with room for a 150mm piece of track, you can then connect the track on different panels with a 300mm length. This would help hold the panels together and also mean thatyou could stand the panels up with no risk to fishplates.
 
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Fred2179G

Fred2179G

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20 Apr 2017
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The obvious solution is to attach the track to a board, then simply lift the board (in sections if I can find a way of doing it without removing the tabs from some of the track sections) and stand them against a wall - possibly outdoors.

Anyone done this?
My first live steamer was a Mamod, and my first track was an oval that I put down on the garage floor and propped against the wall when not in use (or when the car was put away inside.) So yes, I've done it.

I used strips of scrap wood, mostly 1x6, attached to battens underneath that must have been 2x2. It was all a bit random (and it was the 1980s). The battens kept the top in the right place and covered the gaps to make it rigid.

However, I did use flex track. That had the distinct advantage that I wasn't building a base to suit the track, I was laying track on a pre-built base. The curves were much simpler to design!
 
justme igor

justme igor

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17 Apr 2020
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If placed dry, regular underlayment will do fine for the next 15 years.
As mentioned before, lay your tracks 15 cm back from the edge of the wood and connect with a 30 cm piece.
If you decide to work with "locks" or fixed slots you can lay tracks to the edge and rule out the need for the 30 cm pieces, if you go with no power on the tracks, or else you would need some sockets and plugs on every sheet.(been there done that)

Go to a construction store/home improvement store and they can cut the sheet(standard size:240cm x 120 cm x 18mm) up to strips of to your wish 6x20 cm, 4x30cm or 3x40 cm or what ever your desire is. Lengths of 240 cm are easy to handle.
Get also per strip two kitchen/cabinet? handles, for better and easy lifting.
A cheap "outside furniture cover" will do, to protect from the elements when in storage outside.
Place it on some cradles so it will not touch the ground.

Hope this helps, my two cents,
Best Igor