Stripping Accucraft K27

R

rusty spike

Registered
4 Aug 2019
58
5
UK
Hi,
I wish to strip down my Accucraft K27 to give it a re-spray, re-number and install replacement wiring for the lamps. I'm guessing mine is around 10 years or so old. I haven't any instructions for my loco and I haven't found any on line that show this information. I'm not too bothered about wiring diagrams, I have that sorted.
If anyone has some they can share I would be most grateful :)
Thanks, Richard
 
maxi-model

maxi-model

UK/US/ROW steam narrow gauge railways 1:1
27 Oct 2009
4,707
234
Bucks/Oxon/Northants area
Accucraft told me the factories they used in China never issued wiring schematics for these locos :banghead: Does yours have pick ups both sides on all wheels or the earlier one side tender only, the other drivers only ? Wipers on both sides on the tender trucks it's the former. Wiring on the earlier version, with alternate side pick-ups, is very simple and you can trace it by just eyeballing it.
 
R

rusty spike

Registered
4 Aug 2019
58
5
UK
Accucraft told me the factories they used in China never issued wiring schematics for these locos :banghead: Does yours have pick ups both sides on all wheels or the earlier one side tender only, the other drivers only ? Wipers on both sides on the tender trucks it's the former. Wiring on the earlier version, with alternate side pick-ups, is very simple and you can trace it by just eyeballing it.
Mine had the pickups on both sides of the tender wheels. These were made redundant and removed as I have converted to battery R/C DCC.
I was hoping to find an ‘exploded’ diagram as I wish to remove the boiler/smokebox and cylinders for re-spraying. While I had access to the wiring, I was going to tear it out and also replace the headlight, marker lights and cab light for LEDs. I don’t need the voltage stabilser as I will use the 5V supply on my Zimo decoder, so I have no need for a wiring diagram as I will be re-wiring to enable separate switching from the decoder.
 
maxi-model

maxi-model

UK/US/ROW steam narrow gauge railways 1:1
27 Oct 2009
4,707
234
Bucks/Oxon/Northants area
Sorry I misread. One tip, learnt from my own efforts with this loco - When disassembling take care as some of the nuts are threaded onto longer bolts/machine screw, small and large, and used to "lock" that longer bolt in place. Turn the wrong bolt "head" the wrong way and snap ! Don't ask me how I know. Max
 
R

rusty spike

Registered
4 Aug 2019
58
5
UK
Sorry I misread. One tip, learnt from my own efforts with this loco - When disassembling take care as some of the nuts are threaded onto longer bolts/machine screw, small and large, and used to "lock" that longer bolt in place. Turn the wrong bolt "head" the wrong way and snap ! Don't ask me how I know. Max
Sounds like a recipe for disaster :fearscream:
I bought the spinners for the different size hex nuts, and they were useful when removing the ash pan when wiring up the decoder. I’m more used to building nickel silver 0 gauge locos, but eventually gave up due to the eyesight dropping off a bit.....but this loco looks like a cats cradle to dismantle so I may invest in a decent magnifying head set.
 
dunnyrail

dunnyrail

DOGS, Garden Railways, Steam Trains, Jive Dancing,
25 Oct 2009
15,952
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St.Neots Cambridgeshire UK
Mine had the pickups on both sides of the tender wheels. These were made redundant and removed as I have converted to battery R/C DCC.
I was hoping to find an ‘exploded’ diagram as I wish to remove the boiler/smokebox and cylinders for re-spraying. While I had access to the wiring, I was going to tear it out and also replace the headlight, marker lights and cab light for LEDs. I don’t need the voltage stabilser as I will use the 5V supply on my Zimo decoder, so I have no need for a wiring diagram as I will be re-wiring to enable separate switching from the decoder.
Suggest digital pics on each stage of disassembly if you have the facility. Put back together in reverse picture order.
 
maxi-model

maxi-model

UK/US/ROW steam narrow gauge railways 1:1
27 Oct 2009
4,707
234
Bucks/Oxon/Northants area
Greg could you post a link to the schematic for Accucraft's K-27 on their site. The only PDF manual on their website that relates to the K-27, that I found so far, is the regular one supplied with the loco that is very basic to say the least. It's not like the Bachmann K-27 that has both a wiring schematic and an exploded view of the loco with all its components labeled.

Personally I would avoid any major or unnecessary disassembly unless one has a degree of competence or confidence with these things. I have neither. Does it really need a repaint/refresh or will a careworn appearance suffice ? As Jon says, document the teardown and label the parts. try to keep sub assemblies together.

Another tip (if you had not already realised) - a lot of surface mounted parts are attached/joined by regular soldering. Otherwise mostly small 2mm machine screws are used. Small parts and pipework are not normally glued or held on with tabs - if they are it's an "aftermarket" repair. Parts are either S/S or brass, if moulded - a lost wax process. Accucraft also seem to have a liking for interference fits. Max
 
R

rusty spike

Registered
4 Aug 2019
58
5
UK
Greg could you post a link to the schematic for Accucraft's K-27 on their site. The only PDF manual on their website that relates to the K-27, that I found so far, is the regular one supplied with the loco that is very basic to say the least. It's not like the Bachmann K-27 that has both a wiring schematic and an exploded view of the loco with all its components labeled.

Personally I would avoid any major or unnecessary disassembly unless one has a degree of competence or confidence with these things. I have neither. Does it really need a repaint/refresh or will a careworn appearance suffice ? As Jon says, document the teardown and label the parts. try to keep sub assemblies together.

Another tip (if you had not already realised) - a lot of surface mounted parts are attached/joined by regular soldering. Otherwise mostly small 2mm machine screws are used. Small parts and pipework are not normally glued or held on with tabs - if they are it's an "aftermarket" repair. Parts are either S/S or brass, if moulded - a lost wax process. Accucraft also seem to have a liking for interference fits. Max
I have a liking for a well weathered locomotive. When I build them they are always finished ex works then layers of ‘filth’ built up using the air brush and dry brushing. Perhaps with some careful masking and proper ‘touching in’ of the bare brass with a decent etch primer then a light coat of satin black will suffice as I plan to weather the K27.
I have questions regarding weathering of large scale locos, so I will post on the weathering section.
In reply to Sean, the basic reply is that the Bachmann K27 is mainly plastic bodied, the Accucraft K27 is mostly brass, nickel silver with lost wax brass castings. Both are exquisite models !
 
maxi-model

maxi-model

UK/US/ROW steam narrow gauge railways 1:1
27 Oct 2009
4,707
234
Bucks/Oxon/Northants area
Silly question ... how diff is the bachmann 27 ...
Totally - Different materials - no plastic involved, as a result a different method of construction and wiring, etc', etc'. Yes, they both represent a D&RGW K-27 and are electrically driven but that's about all they have in common.

It has more in common with their live steamer version (surprise !) and any other of that type of loco than any plastic Bachmann product :) That does not make the Bachmann K-27 a poorer product. I've got 2 of them and they have a lot of advantages over the Accy, not least that they can get round a tighter radius. The Accy' though has that "museum" quality feel about it that a plastic loco cannot convey. Max
 
Last edited:
Greg Elmassian

Greg Elmassian

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8 Mar 2014
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San Diego
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I must apologize, I see that the posted manual does not have the schematic, like the "old style" manuals.

This one is representative: http://www.accucraft.com/manuals/AT 20p3 SP 4-6-0 EL LS Web Manual.pdf

But I have NEVER found that any Accucraft schematic was accurate. A friend and I were working on this particular loco, and the actual wiring was still different, and more similar to other models.

The bottom line is what good advice I can give you: some the LEDs already have a dropping resistor inline, a very tiny one, usually in heatshrink near the LED itself, and these are sometimes 1/8 watt resistors, basically the same diameter as the wire with insulation.

Most of the smaller lamps, headlights are given 6 volts regulated, and with the dropping resistor inline draw something like 10 milliamperes or less. When we connected these to the 5 volt common on a decoder, there was no appreciable loss of brightness.

The marker lamps were often wired in series and drew more current, but on some locos they were incandescent and powered by a 3.5 volt regulator and on some were 6.5 volts. You should measure the voltage....

The cab lights, when present were a crapshoot.


In the tender there are usually 2 boards, identical boards that vary by the number of sockets soldered in. on the underside of each board there can be up to two 3 terminal regulators, and if you put the tender on a track, run it up to 12 volts, you can measure the regulated voltages supplied... this is the safest way NOT to burn out those small hard to replace LEDs.

I did have one loco where the 6 volt regulator was hidden on the underside of the gear tower in the loco itself... that was a bugger.

If I can be of any more help let me know.

Greg
 
Fred2179G

Fred2179G

Registered
20 Apr 2017
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USA
a lot of surface mounted parts are attached/joined by regular soldering.
Yes. Be very careful as the whole plumbing system may fall apart when you apply a little heat. (The paint is hi-temp - I never managed to burn it.)
I took my C-19 (live steam) apart to change the domes on the boiler, and it wasn't too tricky. Just take lots of photos and don't lose the bolts or nuts!
What will happen though is that you'll try to unscrew a bolt holding something to the boiler and discover either the thread has stripped in the hole or the bolt breaks as it was locked when installed. They are only brass, so the hole can be re-tapped without too much trouble. They are not all M2, so be prepared to source some M2.2, M1.6 and similar brass bolts.
 
JohnSol

JohnSol

Registered
24 Sep 2017
61
25
USA
Yes. Be very careful as the whole plumbing system may fall apart when you apply a little heat. (The paint is hi-temp - I never managed to burn it.)
I took my C-19 (live steam) apart to change the domes on the boiler, and it wasn't too tricky. Just take lots of photos and don't lose the bolts or nuts!
What will happen though is that you'll try to unscrew a bolt holding something to the boiler and discover either the thread has stripped in the hole or the bolt breaks as it was locked when installed. They are only brass, so the hole can be re-tapped without too much trouble. They are not all M2, so be prepared to source some M2.2, M1.6 and similar brass bolts.
Paint and fasteners...that is critical information for disassembling an electric Accucraft locomotive. Thank you Fred.

Fasteners: I recently found Scale Hardware, Scalehardware - Model Motorcars, Ltd. as a source for the miniature fasteners used in the Accucraft models. Small Parts & Hardware

Paint: I haven't found a source for a paint that matches Accucraft's OEM paint. Nor have I found a solvent to dissolve the factory paint. Any help here will be appreciated.
 
Fred2179G

Fred2179G

Registered
20 Apr 2017
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USA
Paint: I haven't found a source for a paint that matches Accucraft's OEM paint. Nor have I found a solvent to dissolve the factory paint.
I think you'll have to sand it down with wet 600 grit emery and put a new coat of primer on.
 
R

rusty spike

Registered
4 Aug 2019
58
5
UK
I think you'll have to sand it down with wet 600 grit emery and put a new coat of primer on.
I use Clostermann 1K black etch primer on any exposed brass. If leaving mat black it doesn’t need a top coat. The finish is as good as I can achieve from my airbrush.
I used automotive rubbing compound to remove the number decals. This left a nice gloss finish on which to apply the replacement decals. Once dry, a mist of satin lacquer (from Halfords) made an almost perfect match. Also, the Halfords aluminium over sprayed with satin lacquer is a super match for the smokebox and chimney. Meticulous masking and shielding saves a major strip down. It may well be hidden under several coats of grime at a later date :)