So just how waterproof is a Massoth Navigator?

Ralphmp

Ralphmp

Registered
6 Jan 2010
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So I had a good day on Sunday - fixed some troublesome points, reinstated some LD signals that had been disconnected during track alterations and ran a few trains.

Had another good day yesterday seeing my Mum on her 104th birthday.

Went in the garden this morning and had an Oh S***! moment - I realised I'd left both of my Navigators outside since Sunday and they had received a healthy dousing from the rain that came through yesterday evening. I'm sure I'm not the first person to soak a Navi, and I probably;y won't be the last, but I am a bit concerned on how best to dry them out.

So far, I've removed the batteries and had them in the sunshine on a windowsill that gets pretty warm and the condensation in the screen of one has now disappeared. However, I'm not sure how long to leave them before they are thoroughly dried out and I don't want to start dismantling them unless I really have to.

Any thoughts on a "safe" period before they will be ready to use again?
 
PhilP

PhilP

G Scale, 7/8th's, Electronics
5 Jun 2013
23,502
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Tamworth, Staffs.
Perceived wisdom is to put things like this in a tub of dries rice..

Immediately! Open them up and remove the batteries!!! - Damp, plus a small current will cause tracks on the PCB to disappear.

If they do not seem too wet, leave them, with the battery cover off, in the airing cupboard. - Do not touch them for a week.
Then try each in turn.

Nice, clean water should not do too much damage. The damage is the current tracking across 'damp', or dirt, of a complete submerge and water into anything mechanical.
 
Ralphmp

Ralphmp

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Thanks Phil. Fortunately not a complete submerge, but still bloomin' frustrating! I'd hoped to be running some trains this week. :(
 
Zerogee

Zerogee

Clencher's Bogleman
25 Oct 2009
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North Essex
From what I have read/heard, I would second the bag/tub of rice idea - never had to use it myself, thankfully, but apparently it can work wonders on soaked technology (smartphones dropped down the loo, etc). Go to supermarket, buy BIG bag of cheapest rice you can find, pour a load into a large ziploc baggie (enough to completely submerge the device in) and seal your Navvy up in it - leave for a good few days.

Jon.
 
PhilP

PhilP

G Scale, 7/8th's, Electronics
5 Jun 2013
23,502
493
Tamworth, Staffs.
Leave bag of technology/rice, open, in the airing cupboard..

One of the 'killers', is to 'just try it' too early, whilst there is still moisture in the guts..


Only you can make the call, on putting batteries in and trying it, and only you know how wet it was when you picked it up! :( :sweating::sweating:
You do need to be patient on this one.. :nerd::nod::nod:

Having said that.. Today is Tuesday..If water did not pour-out, you might be OK by Saturday?? - If there is the slightest sign of 'condensation' in the display area, DON'T try it.. Leave it longer.
 
Gavin Sowry

Gavin Sowry

Garden Railroader and Raconteur
27 Oct 2009
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Hutt Valley, NZ
Went in the garden this morning and had an Oh S***! moment -
Been there, done that (with my TE). Had water literally pouring out when I took the back off. Dabbed what I could, with a dry rag, and put it (the TE, not the rag, silly) in the hot water cupboard to dry out.
Figured that when the foam behind the buttons was really dry, she'd be right.
 
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Zerogee

Zerogee

Clencher's Bogleman
25 Oct 2009
16,787
186
North Essex
Can you remove the batteries from a Navigator? I thought they had built in lithiums.

Greg
Nope, 3 standard AA cells, you can use either disposable drycells or NiMH rechargeables.

Jon
 
PhilP

PhilP

G Scale, 7/8th's, Electronics
5 Jun 2013
23,502
493
Tamworth, Staffs.
Nope, 3 standard AA cells, you can use either disposable drycells or NiMH rechargeables.

Jon
Or, none at all.. If you plug a wire from the CS into it.. :):nerd:
(Always worth remembering that one).. :nod:
 
dennishodge

dennishodge

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21 Feb 2018
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Bellevue, WA, USA
Apparently the rice solution is a myth.

Air drying effective at eliminating water; but the article linked offers a more invasive method, summarized as:
  1. Minimize exposure to water as much as possible
  2. Power the device off immediately
  3. Drain the device to get as much water out as you can
  4. If you can remove your phone’s battery, and you can see it’s been exposed to water, remove and replace the battery
  5. Remove the logic board and other parts that appear corroded (except the camera and display) and immerse them in 90% isopropyl alcohol.
  6. Scrub the immersed parts, dry the alcohol, and meticulously reassemble.
 
Greg Elmassian

Greg Elmassian

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I would put remove battery as #1... I've dropped a few phones in water, last time a swimming pool.

Also, compressed air to remove as much water should be added to #3

Since I was in the cell phone industry at the time, I was able to remove the battery in a few seconds, pop the case open, and my friend had compressed air.

Saved a very expensive Motorola Razor. This was years ago when you could do this.

Nowadays, moisture in a non-water resistant device normally gets into the screen and between the screen and the touch panel.

Rinsing with alcohol is a good idea, better to use the spray electronics cleaner that does not harm plastic.

Greg
 
Ralphmp

Ralphmp

Registered
6 Jan 2010
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Herts
Thankyou for all the suggestions and advice. I have been helped by the typical warm September weather so Ive had the Navi's outside in the sunshine for a few days and yesterday I reassembled and tried them out. So far, all appears well so my "shutdown" procedure for my railway will be amended to have as it's first step - Turn off Navigators and take indoors!