Roundhouse Engineering “Merseysider”.

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Rhinochugger

Rhinochugger

Retired Oik
27 Oct 2009
23,475
3,286
North West Norfolk
They look good, and the twin buffers suit them.

One thing I found slightly strange when I was doing some research for parts following my blue and yellow dismal's latest failure, and that is that on some of these models, Roundhouse use a 3-pole motor. Now there may be good technical reasons, but I had always assumed that 5- or 7-pole motors would have more, smoother power :think::think::think::think::think:

Sure, we don't all do a lot of shunting and maneuvering but I thought the benefits were more than just a smooth take-off.
 
stockers

stockers

Trains, aircraft, models, walking, beer, travel
Staff member
GSC Moderator
24 Oct 2009
25,368
3,744
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Nr. Ashford, Kent. England.
The biggest single difference between different electric motors is how well they are made.
Once you get to a quality motor with good bearings, lots of wire in the windings, balance, magnets etc. a three pole motor will usually run faster than a multi pole motor - because there are less electrical changes in the armature. It may however start and run less smoothly.
A multi pole motor has to have smaller windings on each pole - otherwise the motor would need to grow in size considerably - this tends to limit the torque to about the same whatever the number of poles.
Power is torque x speed. Torque remains fairly consistant and a three pole motor can run faster - more power.
On to all this you add gears and drive wheels - all of which can make a huge difference to the overall performance. As a three pole motor may be running faster, it needs lower gearing for our use - which increases power - again.
But, at the end of the day, quality will out perform poles.
 
Rhinochugger

Rhinochugger

Retired Oik
27 Oct 2009
23,475
3,286
North West Norfolk
The biggest single difference between different electric motors is how well they are made.
Once you get to a quality motor with good bearings, lots of wire in the windings, balance, magnets etc. a three pole motor will usually run faster than a multi pole motor - because there are less electrical changes in the armature. It may however start and run less smoothly.
A multi pole motor has to have smaller windings on each pole - otherwise the motor would need to grow in size considerably - this tends to limit the torque to about the same whatever the number of poles.
Power is torque x speed. Torque remains fairly consistant and a three pole motor can run faster - more power.
On to all this you add gears and drive wheels - all of which can make a huge difference to the overall performance. As a three pole motor may be running faster, it needs lower gearing for our use - which increases power - again.
But, at the end of the day, quality will out perform poles.
Oooh - poles apart :lipssealed::lipssealed::lipssealed:

and yet some of their chassis use Buhler 5-pole motors :think::think:
 
Last edited:
JeffofSpace

JeffofSpace

Registered
19 Jul 2018
75
22
41
Seattle
Yep, the green looks classic.
 
stockers

stockers

Trains, aircraft, models, walking, beer, travel
Staff member
GSC Moderator
24 Oct 2009
25,368
3,744
60
Nr. Ashford, Kent. England.
.............and yet some of their chassis use Buhler 5-pole motors :think::think:
Multi pole motors tend to start and run better. We often run our motors quite slowly - a multi pole motor is probably smoother.
 
Rhinochugger

Rhinochugger

Retired Oik
27 Oct 2009
23,475
3,286
North West Norfolk
Multi pole motors tend to start and run better. We often run our motors quite slowly - a multi pole motor is probably smoother.
Yeah, well, that's what started me off - I usually go for a 5-pole motor :think::think::think::think: - although I do have one loco with a Buhler 7-pole motor, but with its 50:1 gearing, it's difficult to really pick up how smooth it is
 
casey jones snr

casey jones snr

Registered
20 Apr 2010
6,700
6,231
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Charnwood Forest Railway. Rothley. Leics.
Due to operational difficulties (buffer lock when shunting) I decided to change the outside buffers and coupling hooks. I wasn’t overly keen on the single combined coupler and hook. I opted for the multiple height coupler which I think suits the locomotives rather well. The side safety chins also serve to disguise the original side buffer holes.
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PhilP

PhilP

G Scale, 7/8th's, Electronics
5 Jun 2013
21,797
2,673
Tamworth, Staffs.
I like the look, but those chains look remarkably close to the railhead?

I hope they don't catch on anything.. :eek: :think:
 
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dunnyrail

dunnyrail

DOGS, Garden Railways, Steam Trains, Jive Dancing,
25 Oct 2009
13,857
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St.Neots Cambridgeshire UK
Due to operational difficulties (buffer lock when shunting) I decided to change the outside buffers and coupling hooks. I wasn’t overly keen on the single combined coupler and hook. I opted for the multiple height coupler which I think suits the locomotives rather well. The side safety chins also serve to disguise the original side buffer holes.
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Sensible conversion Paul, double buffers unless they are oversize will not work that well through many of your points as you have found out. I would think R3 minimum and then not on a crossover but to a Siding that has a good straight length before any curve. On my 0 Gauge Standard Gauge Light Railway I had to incorporate a bit of straight on the 2’6” Crossovers and with the Bogie Coach have Elongated oblong buffers to stop locking.
 
casey jones snr

casey jones snr

Registered
20 Apr 2010
6,700
6,231
68
Charnwood Forest Railway. Rothley. Leics.
I like the look, but those chains look remarkably close to the railhead?

I hope they don't catch on anything.. :eek: :think:
Optical illusion Phil, they don’t extend below the buffer beam.