Reversing loop reliability.

Anglian

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23 Jul 2018
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Armagh
I'm mulling over an extension to the line which, given the area I want to use is going to be problematic. The railway is track-powered. I won't be able to fit in a circuit so one solution would involve a reversing loop, but I would like some opinions as to their operating reliability.
Thanks for any time spent.
Trevor
 

dunnyrail

DOGS, Garden Railways, Steam Trains, Jive Dancing,
25 Oct 2009
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If you are DCC (which I think you are) the Massoth Revercse Loop Module is reliable, best if you can to put it somewhere where it is out of the weather. Some put in a weatherproof box outside or a building, but my choice would be a Shed or Garage even if that means longer wire runs.
 

Anglian

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Armagh
Excellent. Thanks Jon.
 

Gizzy

A gentleman, a scholar, and a railway modeller....
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I second Jon's comment.

Put in a IP 67 rated box, inside a building and make sure it is off the floor too.

On my previous layout, I had one on a baulk of timber inside a building.

My pair live in a metal box I recycled from work, which formerly had emergency lights mounted to it. This box is screwed inside the apex of the 'Waiting Room' and away from the elements....


thumbnail_20200613_190138.jpg
 

Anglian

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Thanks Gizzy. That seems to cover what I needed.
 

phils2um

Phil S
11 Sep 2015
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Ann Arbor, Michigan
I use a LGB reverse loop module which is really just a rebadged Massoth. (I was able to get the LGB version about $10 cheaper.) I agree they are very reliable. I would not be nearly so concerned about IP67 protection though! Mine has been sitting year round in a Pola building for 5 years now with no ill effects. We get all 4 seasons where I live so the Pola building has been exposed to everything except floods. Just protect the reverse loop module from direct exposure to the elements. Plus, putting it near the point of use keeps the wire lengths more reasonable. Here are some pics.

DCC Conversion Reverse Loops

 
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Gavin Sowry

Garden Railroader and Raconteur
27 Oct 2009
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My two reverse loops control systems cost me less than $5.00 a piece, and work faultlessly.
No diodes or other fancy electronics to go wrong, or that require a mortgage to purchase, just a simple DPDT switch is all that I need.
 

dunnyrail

DOGS, Garden Railways, Steam Trains, Jive Dancing,
25 Oct 2009
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I use a LGB reverse loop module which is really just a rebadged Massoth. (I was able to get the LGB version about $10 cheaper.) I agree they are very reliable. I would not be nearly so concerned about IP67 protection though! Mine has been sitting year round in a Pola building for 5 years now with no ill effects. We get all 4 seasons where I live so the Pola building has been exposed to everything except floods. Just protect the reverse loop module from direct exposure to the elements. Plus, putting it near the point of use keeps the wire lengths more reasonable. Here are some pics.

DCC Conversion Reverse Loops

We used 2 LGB Modules on the Ruschbahn located outside in a secure dry box under Mountains and thus out of direct weather. Cannot be sure exactly how long they lasted but the line was in place between 2004-2013 and both failed during that time (5-6 years from memory) to be replaced with Massoth units that lasted till the line was demolished and were ultimately sold via Glendale Junction second hand. So yer pays yer money and chooses yer location and hopes for the best.
 

LGeoB

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12 Dec 2017
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Perth, Western Australia
Concerning all these electronic devices permanently wired to outside track, isn't anyone worried about lightning strikes? I air gap all my electronics connected to external track.

Geoff
 

PhilP

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Concerning all these electronic devices permanently wired to outside track, isn't anyone worried about lightning strikes? I air gap all my electronics connected to external track.

Geoff
Not a major problem here in the UK.. - Though this may change, as our climate changes?

PhilP
 

JimmyB

Semi-Retired; more time for trains.
Concerning all these electronic devices permanently wired to outside track, isn't anyone worried about lightning strikes? I air gap all my electronics connected to external track.

Geoff
Not sure how you air gap a component connected to the track, or do you mean you air gap them when not in use.
 

dunnyrail

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Not sure how you air gap a component connected to the track, or do you mean you air gap them when not in use.
Have to say having see some horror stories in USA of Lightning Strikes trashing controlers I always used to disconnect the mains lead, track power plug and wireless plug from the Massoth unit and placed them a foot or so away between running sessions. Now it is in the loft I just unplug it as I do with all computing when not in use or charging.
 

LGeoB

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Perth, Western Australia
Not sure how you air gap a component connected to the track, or do you mean you air gap them when not in use.
Disconnect when not in use. I keep all my stock on tracks in a shed and remove track pieces to airgap what is in the shed from outside.
 

phils2um

Phil S
11 Sep 2015
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I've got many 60 to 100 ft plus tall trees around my RR. Although lightning damage to my control system is possible, my RR is much more likely to be damaged by a tree losing a limb or even being felled by a lightning strike! We had one such tree come down in a storm about 35 years ago. It was just dumb luck it missed doing major damage to my or a neighbors house! A rented chain saw, multiple cases of beer and a bunch of mates from work made a fairly quick job of the cleanup. My only mistake was not inviting them back to help dig up the stump! Looking back OSEH would have had conniptions!

edit added: severe drift!
 
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Paul M

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All electric equipment should be disconnected whilst not in use where possible.
 

David1226

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All electric equipment should be disconnected whilst not in use where possible.

I had a relation who used to turn off his pacemaker in bed at night, that didn't end well.

David
 

Rhinochugger

Retired Oik
27 Oct 2009
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I never thought about it at the time, but the first house we lived in, deep in the London suburbs and within shouting distance of the local gas works and walking distance of the power station with two whopping chimneys, had a lighting conductor. Nowadays I wonder why? :think::think: There were three storey houses across the road on two sides (we lived on a cross-roads) so what was the point (apart from the fact that it was in the ground - the point that is :confused: )?
 

beavercreek

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I never thought about it at the time, but the first house we lived in, deep in the London suburbs and within shouting distance of the local gas works and walking distance of the power station with two whopping chimneys, had a lighting conductor. Nowadays I wonder why? :think::think: There were three storey houses across the road on two sides (we lived on a cross-roads) so what was the point (apart from the fact that it was in the ground - the point that is :confused: )?

Sheeeeet lightning strikes??? :D :D :D
 

PhilP

G Scale, 7/8th's, Electronics
5 Jun 2013
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Tamworth, Staffs.
I never thought about it at the time, but the first house we lived in, deep in the London suburbs and within shouting distance of the local gas works and walking distance of the power station with two whopping chimneys, had a lighting conductor. Nowadays I wonder why? :think::think: There were three storey houses across the road on two sides (we lived on a cross-roads) so what was the point (apart from the fact that it was in the ground - the point that is :confused: )?
Cos like all aerial ordnance, it quite often misses the target, and hits the little guy! :eek::mask:

:rofl::rofl::rofl: