Q....water profing point motors

FrenchChuffed

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I was wondering if any of you had had a go at improving the water risistance of the LGB point motors? i was contemplating trying to do a 3D printed cover as the connector screw holes have a tendancy to collect water and then rust so a cover over the whole of the motor may give extra protection. Anyone tried it?
 

musket the dog

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I haven't tried that specifically but I have had some experience trying to water proof 3D prints.

Mostly I would describe them as splash proof but there is some natural porosity in the parts so if left to soak, like rain water standing on top of a point motor, the water may eventually find its way through.

We use FDM and SLS printing to prototype blow moulded coolant tanks at work. I have had to seal them with Bostik Concrete Sealer to get them to hold water. However something as simple as a coat of paint and lacquer might be enough for this scenario?
 

dunnyrail

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I was wondering if any of you had had a go at improving the water risistance of the LGB point motors? i was contemplating trying to do a 3D printed cover as the connector screw holes have a tendancy to collect water and then rust so a cover over the whole of the motor may give extra protection. Anyone tried it?
The motors themselves are pretty well bomb proof but as you noted the screws can tend to rust, I have in the past given them a coat of grease to help keep them virtually rust free. You biggest enemy with the motors is dirt and miniature animal insect organisations including sometimes ants nests. I doubt a printed cover would prevent that or even rusting of the screws.
 

JimmyB

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I blob silicon grease on the screws, and a spray of GT85 a couple of times a year.
 
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JimmyB

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GT85 is that like WD40
No, not really, the WD 40 most people use is a penetrate, (though they do make a silicone):


GT85 is more a general purpose silicon spray

 

maxi-model

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Don't forget to pop a bit graphite paste or similar on electrical connections to minimize risk of these contacts and their connections becoming tarnished and offering poor electrical conductivity affecting reliability. Make sure there is good drainage under and around the motors too. I echo what Jon has said about little critters - my LGB motors were a favorite nesting/breeding spot for spiders in my garden :D

In the end I gave up the battle on my mostly in shade line - I switched to pneumatic operation for both points an signals. I use the US made, Clippard originated, SVRR system, available from Anything Narrow Gauge in the UK. Max
 

Neil Robinson

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Make sure there is good drainage under and around the motors too.
I choose to drill a couple of drainage holes in the baseplate. I've obtained a few spare motors over the years and whenever a motor plays up it's replaced with a spare and the offending motor stripped, cleaned out and reassembled to join the other spares
 

FrenchChuffed

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Thanks for all the comments and advice chaps always good to hear of other peoples experience's
 

Greg Elmassian

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WD40:
  • WD 40 is originally to keep moisture away to keep from rusting, not a penetrant.
  • WD stands for Water Displacement formula 40... the idea is that it would displace moisture and leave a film, and then this would keep moisture from rusting/corroding metal.

I agree with Neil, the weep holes in the bottom of the motor housing are important, to keep water from building up. Make sure you have a small one in each corner.

There is no way to keep water completely out, they would have to be hermetically sealed, not easily possible with the moving arm that protrudes from the body.

Since air gets inside, the action of cooling at the end of the day, pulls air into the housing... then when the sun hits it, the air expands.... if any water has collected inside (natural condensation) hopefully it goes out the drain holes, and then further warming should push out any humid air. Then the cycle repeats.

Often, when people try to seal up these motors, all they do is wind up trapping liquid inside, making matters worse.

Greg
 

JimmyB

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WD40:
  • WD 40 is originally to keep moisture away to keep from rusting, not a penetrant.
  • WD stands for Water Displacement formula 40... the idea is that it would displace moisture and leave a film, and then this would keep moisture from rusting/corroding metal.

I agree with Neil, the weep holes in the bottom of the motor housing are important, to keep water from building up. Make sure you have a small one in each corner.

There is no way to keep water completely out, they would have to be hermetically sealed, not easily possible with the moving arm that protrudes from the body.

Since air gets inside, the action of cooling at the end of the day, pulls air into the housing... then when the sun hits it, the air expands.... if any water has collected inside (natural condensation) hopefully it goes out the drain holes, and then further warming should push out any humid air. Then the cycle repeats.

Often, when people try to seal up these motors, all they do is wind up trapping liquid inside, making matters worse.

Greg
It use to contain acetone, which actually absorbs the water then is rinsed away the water away with it, any residue evaporates. which is why it was good as a penetrant and rust remover, I think the formulae has now changed.
 

Greg Elmassian

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I think the acetone is wrong, you could smell it, but there is kerosene and other solvents in it. that post saying Acetone is speculative.

The biggest rumor is that it used to contain fish oil, also false.

You can go to their web site, and dispel some of the rumors.

The WD part of it is explained in this article, where they actually analyzed it with gas chromatography (GC) and mass spectroscopy (MS).


If you read this you will understand how it displaces water and penetrates, and lubricates, but really not a great or permanent lubricant.

This stuff was invented right here in San Diego, we know it well.

Greg
 

ntpntpntp

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When my line was up and running I used to simply squidge a blob of silicone sealant over the terminal screw holes and the cable entry point. Easy to remove if necessary and replace again afterward. My motors weren't at ground level, but about 4" above ground on the wooden framework that supported the track.
 

JimmyB

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I think the acetone is wrong, you could smell it, but there is kerosene and other solvents in it. that post saying Acetone is speculative.

The biggest rumor is that it used to contain fish oil, also false.

You can go to their web site, and dispel some of the rumors.

The WD part of it is explained in this article, where they actually analyzed it with gas chromatography (GC) and mass spectroscopy (MS).


If you read this you will understand how it displaces water and penetrates, and lubricates, but really not a great or permanent lubricant.

This stuff was invented right here in San Diego, we know it well.

Greg
As a chemical laboratory assistant some years ago I can confirm it use to contain acetone - end!!!!
 

GAP

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I think the acetone is wrong, you could smell it, but there is kerosene and other solvents in it. that post saying Acetone is speculative.

The biggest rumor is that it used to contain fish oil, also false.

You can go to their web site, and dispel some of the rumors.

The WD part of it is explained in this article, where they actually analyzed it with gas chromatography (GC) and mass spectroscopy (MS).


If you read this you will understand how it displaces water and penetrates, and lubricates, but really not a great or permanent lubricant.

This stuff was invented right here in San Diego, we know it well.

Greg

At the 1:1 railway we abandoned WD40 in favour of Inox spray it is by far superior to WD40.

For aiding against water ingress on the terminals try using a silicone grease.
 

LGB-Sid

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I was wondering if any of you had had a go at improving the water risistance of the LGB point motors? i was contemplating trying to do a 3D printed cover as the connector screw holes have a tendancy to collect water and then rust so a cover over the whole of the motor may give extra protection. Anyone tried it?
I made a waterproof cover for mine it's inside the bottom of the Signal box then has rods connected to the points.

sig1.jpg
 

FrenchChuffed

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The link edge mechanism looks very prototypical there in th grass,
 
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