Piko Double Track Engine Shed - puzzling instructions

OBBherr

Registered
17 Aug 2016
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Hampshire, UK
Has anybody assembled the Piko 62001 Double Track Engine shed and can advise me on a specific point?

At step 15 it is necessary to fit the grey solid roofs number 211.50.

However the instructions say NOT to use adhesive to attach these items. How are these items are to be held in place; just loose-laid?

If I place the building outdoors, surely the wind will blow the roof off if it is not glued in place?

Any advice would be appreciated. I have emailed Piko customer service but no answer. Thanks in advance.
 

JimmyB

Semi-Retired; more time for trains.
I built a modeltown shed, and did not fix the roof, the reason being access to the inside when the shed is fixed in position!!
 

SevenOfDiamonds

Registered
3 Jan 2010
193
64
However the instructions say NOT to use adhesive to attach these items
I've not assembled a Piko kit, but where does it say not to glue?

1617812188833.png
All the best

David
 

dutchelm

Registered
24 Oct 2009
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133
N Somerset
I glued the roof on my shed. I cannot remember any no glue instructions when I built it.
 

ebay mike

Retired, but still hoarding. (GOF)
6 Dec 2011
3,828
675
Norfolk - edge of nowhere.
I've not assembled a Piko kit, but where does it say not to glue?

View attachment 283405
All the best

David
Just above part number 10 there is a symbol of a tube of glue crossed through. Similar marking at the other end of the roof above the doors where the steps are.
 

OBBherr

Registered
17 Aug 2016
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Hampshire, UK
Just to add to my original post, I've now fitted (but not glued) the relevant parts and they do seem to sit nicely, and are also quite heavy. But nothing that a good gust of wind or roaming quadruped could not knock off with reasonable ease.
 

dunnyrail

DOGS, Garden Railways, Steam Trains, Jive Dancing,
25 Oct 2009
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St.Neots Cambridgeshire UK
Just to add to my original post, I've now fitted (but not glued) the relevant parts and they do seem to sit nicely, and are also quite heavy. But nothing that a good gust of wind or roaming quadruped could not knock off with reasonable ease.
If you are that worried a drill through with a very small drill of the loose part into the main body of the building should enable some thin brass wire to be pushed in securing the roof in a near invisible way. Once the brass end tarnished it should be near invisible.
 

AustrianNG

Director of my railway
16 Sep 2015
1,197
1,591
Wirral
When I had the same engine shed I glued mine.
After a couple of years, I had to reinforce the roof and walls with small timber battens and silicon sealant to keep the building sturdy.
 

OBBherr

Registered
17 Aug 2016
83
1
67
Hampshire, UK
Thanks to all who replied. I'm going to settle for just resting the roof panels on for now until I have the layout finalised. Then I'll go with a variant of dunnyrail's suggestion. Still baffled about why Piko don't want it glued!
 

OBBherr

Registered
17 Aug 2016
83
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Hampshire, UK
Now I have the shed provisionally positioned on the layout I think I get it. It's much easier to adjust the internals (buffer stop, track angles etc) with the roof off.

Given that PIKO only provide pictorial instructions they have no way of communicating what I believe is the real situation "You can glue it if you like but you may find it easier to do it later (for outdoors) or not all (indoors)".

Once again, thanks for all the input.
 
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NCS from Qbyn

Registered
29 Apr 2016
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Queanbeyan, Australia
When I had the same engine shed I glued mine.
After a couple of years, I had to reinforce the roof and walls with small timber battens and silicon sealant to keep the building sturdy.
I had to similarly re-force mine. I had tried to move it to a new location, after it had been out in the weather for a few years, and it just fell to pieces! I have built quite a few PIKO kits, but this particular one seemed to cause more trouble in this respect than any of the others. However a couple of longitudinal bars under the roof, at a similar level to the latitudinal ones already there, seem to have cured the problem - more or less. The lighter materials used by PIKO seem less suited to larger buildings than, say, the thicker plastic used in POLA buildings. Mind you, a really severe hail storm will do for any of them! [I learned that the hard way!]
 

Gizzy

A gentleman, a scholar, and a railway modeller....
26 Oct 2009
34,172
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Cambridgeshire
www.gscalecentral.net
Has anybody assembled the Piko 62001 Double Track Engine shed and can advise me on a specific point?

At step 15 it is necessary to fit the grey solid roofs number 211.50.

However the instructions say NOT to use adhesive to attach these items. How are these items are to be held in place; just loose-laid?

If I place the building outdoors, surely the wind will blow the roof off if it is not glued in place?

Any advice would be appreciated. I have emailed Piko customer service but no answer. Thanks in advance.
I've just built one of these too.

I didn't glue on the roof either as per instructions. The roof panels just sit on the walls of the building. I guess it's so you can access any locos that may stall in the shed. I haven't fixed it to the ground either.

It's very sheltered in our garden, so I don't expect they will blow away....
 

adverse camber

Registered
2 Dec 2009
218
68
East Anglia
I built one of these about 25 years ago and still have it.
It is one of the less good model buildings as while the walls have been fine, the roof does tend to come off in any sort of wind despite using glue on multiple occasions

I made some modifications (extra struts and L shape pieces) to stop this happening but they were not very effective. I now simply keep the roof inside and only put it out when having a running session then take it off again. otherwise when it blows off the chimneys come adrift.

The other thing that goes is the doors , the posts that act as hinges eventually snap off if they used a lot. They can be fix by drilling a very fine (about 1mm) bit of piano wire into the stub of the post where it has snapped off and then threading a tube of suitable diameter (same as that of the original post) over this. I use epoxy to fix everything in place. Done this a few times now and it seems to work quite well.

That is is still going is a testament to the robust nature of these models (and I have >100 different ones now) but I have found those with big roof spans are the most likely things to give trouble (along with the gutters and drain pipes).