Most Durable Recessed Track

3Bird

3Bird

Registered
11 Dec 2019
73
3
50
Maine, USA
I need to have rail run in front of a gate opening. The gate is on grass, and traffic includes foot, mower and tractor. We live in northern New England (Maine), so freeze-thaw cycles are an issue. What is the best solution?
 
Rhinochugger

Rhinochugger

Retired Oik
27 Oct 2009
27,423
1,476
North West Norfolk
One of our previous members (Spike) set some of his rails in a mortar / concrete mix where he needed access; from memory it was at least double track. You'd need to install a check rail (safety rail) to allow for filling the centre of the track tramway style, and you'd need to make sure that this centre infill is fully bonded to the concrete base to reduce the likelihood of frost attack in air pockets.

I don't have any pictures of his trackbed (I visited on a couple of occasions) and I doubt his pictures from G Scale Mad days are still available.
 
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dunnyrail

dunnyrail

DOGS, Garden Railways, Steam Trains, Jive Dancing,
25 Oct 2009
17,257
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72
St.Neots Cambridgeshire UK
Another option would be to put the track in a trench that is just Rail deep across the path, LGB Track being elephant proof will take the varying traffic just fine. But if you still have worries an insert to the track of plastic the depth of rail mounted on top of the sleepers to match up the the trench will suffice.
 
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Paul M

Registered
25 Oct 2016
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Royston
I cut a paving slab in half and put the tracks through that, before doing what Rhinochugger suggests. True it hasn't been through a winter yet, but it seems OK. Mind you, you need to ensure that the gap between the running and check rail is such that it's easy to remove any debris that will definitely get between them. I'll send some pictures soon.
 
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Gizzy

Gizzy

A gentleman, a scholar, and a railway modeller....
26 Oct 2009
33,338
839
59
Cambridgeshire
www.gscalecentral.net
I did similar to Paul M above. I cut up a paving slab for the spaces between my double track with Mr Angle Grinder (No relation to Mr Lump Hammer!)

I filled in the 'four foot' with some recycled plastic packing, the sort used to protect the edges of boxes, and just screwed this to the sleepers.

Although I've moved house several years ago, I still have the track with the plastic insert on my railway and it has not deteriorated over time....
 
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korm kormsen

korm kormsen

Registered
24 Oct 2009
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Madman

Madman

Registered
25 Oct 2009
13,616
530
Pennsylvania, USA
You mention that you live in Maine. I'm sure your frostline in deeper than ours is in PA. I'm not too fond of placing the track in concrete in areas that have freeze-thaw cycles. Unless you dig down to below the frostline, you could experience heave. I would imaging the frostline in Maine to be deeper than the three feet it is in southeastern Pa.

In your area I would dig down about a foot to a foot and a half. Line the trench with landscape fabric. Fill the trench with 3/4" crushed stone, but leave enough depth at the top for a piece of manufactured decking board, like Trex or something similar.

Rest the board on the crushed stone bed and backfill up to it's edges so that it will not move laterally. Now fasten the track onto the board and cut pieces of the same type board to fit between the rails and one both sides of the track.

This might do a better job of explaining.

IMG_8392.jpg
 
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3Bird

3Bird

Registered
11 Dec 2019
73
3
50
Maine, USA
Thanks, All! I'd love to see some pictures if anyone has any.
 
3Bird

3Bird

Registered
11 Dec 2019
73
3
50
Maine, USA
You mention that you live in Maine. I'm sure your frostline in deeper than ours is in PA. I'm not too fond of placing the track in concrete in areas that have freeze-thaw cycles. Unless you dig down to below the frostline, you could experience heave. I would imaging the frostline in Maine to be deeper than the three feet it is in southeastern Pa.

In your area I would dig down about a foot to a foot and a half. Line the trench with landscape fabric. Fill the trench with 3/4" crushed stone, but leave enough depth at the top for a piece of manufactured decking board, like Trex or something similar.

Rest the board on the crushed stone bed and backfill up to it's edges so that it will not move laterally. Now fasten the track onto the board and cut pieces of the same type board to fit between the rails and one both sides of the track.

This might do a better job of explaining.

View attachment 260575
Great! Thank you. We go down to about 4 feet for frost line, so yea, I've been worried about concrete.
 
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Paul M

Registered
25 Oct 2016
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Royston
IMAG2698.jpg
l
IMAG2696.jpg

Some photos as promised, as I said before, it's not been through a winter yet so I'm not sure how it will turn out. My cementing skills aren't exactly top notch!
 
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Hutch

Hutch

G Gauge, Raising Peaches, Apricots
1 Feb 2012
441
39
Southwest Oklahoma, USA
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dunnyrail

dunnyrail

DOGS, Garden Railways, Steam Trains, Jive Dancing,
25 Oct 2009
17,257
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St.Neots Cambridgeshire UK
Here are a couple of pictures of scenic touches, but the principle is the same. Have used Hips, Plastic Coated Foamboard ans some other Plasticy stuff that defies any sort of glue hence being nailed in place.
F24982F8-C839-498D-B38F-4145B0A70BD7.jpeg
B50C6ED2-EE48-498A-A222-D4FE9EF2CD72.jpeg
 
PhilP

PhilP

G Scale, 7/8th's, Electronics
5 Jun 2013
25,884
1,462
Tamworth, Staffs.
THe OP is talking of a grassed area to be crossed... A gated access.. AND Tractor traffic!

Do we mean a 'lawn-tractor', or something a little bigger? :nerd::think:
 
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3Bird

3Bird

Registered
11 Dec 2019
73
3
50
Maine, USA
THe OP is talking of a grassed area to be crossed... A gated access.. AND Tractor traffic!

Do we mean a 'lawn-tractor', or something a little bigger? :nerd::think:
kubota fall cleanup.jpg
 
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phils2um

Phil S
11 Sep 2015
571
352
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Split-Jaw used to make just what you are looking for in custom lengths. Laid on one to two feet of gravel/paver base it would be perfect. Too bad they're out of business. I just got back from the pub so can't give you a pic but will tomorrow (actually later today). It might give you some ideas. I've got a 1.2m piece in the garage. Maybe you could recreate something similar with a 1.5m piece of flex track and casting resin. Pics to follow. By the way, nice Kubota!
 
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PhilP

PhilP

G Scale, 7/8th's, Electronics
5 Jun 2013
25,884
1,462
Tamworth, Staffs.
I would be tempted to put a concrete 'Pad' either side (deep as you can, and 18 inches square) with a 'steel' across the roadway. An extra board, or two, after the bridge onto the steel, and route a slot in the board on the steel to take the track.
I would probably leave the track unballasted, then a stiff brush could be wiped along the track before a running session to clear debris.

Massive over-engineering, but should be robust, and easy to maintain?
 
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JimmyB

JimmyB

Semi-Retired; more time for trains.
3Bird 3Bird , reading your requirement again and the various replies I would think about a two prong approach, a section of track that is embedded in light weight plastic something similar to the second paragraph in post #7
but leave enough depth at the top for a piece of manufactured decking board, like Trex or something similar.
But make this section removable, and could be replaced by a plank.
So for normal daily use the track remains in place, however for heavy movement the track is replaced by the plank, the track could also be lifted during cold whether.
Not sure how practicable this would or if it would even work, but certainly worth a thought.
 
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