Mitre tool

JimmyB

Semi-Retired; more time for trains.
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Yesterday I thought I might (no pun intended) invest in a mitre block as I have a number of 45 degree angle to cut. however whilst reviewing the item available I came across a number of small (mini) chop-saws with rotating vices. On checking out the reviews, a number of people said the were "useless" of words to that effect, but then there is always somebody who expects more, or does not follow instructions. So, my question is:

Have any of you had any experience using one of these "mini chop saws", and if so, make model etc, and was it any good.

P.S. this will mainly be used on plastics and resin, and occasionally wood.
 

PhilP

G Scale, 7/8th's, Electronics
5 Jun 2013
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How 'mini' do you mean?
Also, what are you wanting to cut? - sizes, how many?

Smaller machines will not have a 'click-stop' at common angles, so down to you, how accurate you set the machine up.
Cutting plastics :
Many blades will chip the edge.
Work too fast, and you will melt the material. - Which may alter its properties and finish.

You will 'waste' a lot of material (on smaller items) as the width of cut is quite significant.

All the waste, ends up as dust / fine particles. - Tends to create a messy environment.


But if you are cutting many repetitive parts, it may be worth the investment?

PhilP
 

JimmyB

Semi-Retired; more time for trains.
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The mini ones I looked at are 12 mm depth of cut, so very small, and some come with a composite "blade" as opposed to a toothed blade.

As with all of these things, you don't really know what you want till you have tried one, and so my question to get some forum feedback :)
 

dunnyrail

DOGS, Garden Railways, Steam Trains, Jive Dancing,
25 Oct 2009
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The mini ones I looked at are 12 mm depth of cut, so very small, and some come with a composite "blade" as opposed to a toothed blade.

As with all of these things, you don't really know what you want till you have tried one, and so my question to get some forum feedback :)
Not able to help but would like to see a link to what your looking at. Though if one is a Dremel, not cheep but their other products look good build quality. Casey has some Dremel Tools in his Shed, perhaps he might like to comment on Dremel quality.

EDIT OH Just done some research and Dremel do not appear to do a chop saw. Found this and other links on YT that may help with your decision Jimmy, though US looks similar to one that I saw on my search.

 
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Rhinochugger

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27 Oct 2009
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Maybe the answer is to but it from Amazon, then if it's no good you can return it :cool:
 

JimmyB

Semi-Retired; more time for trains.
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Not able to help but would like to see a link to what your looking at. Though if one is a Dremel, not cheep but their other products look good build quality. Casey has some Dremel Tools in his Shed, perhaps he might like to comment on Dremel quality.

EDIT OH Just done some research and Dremel do not appear to do a chop saw. Found this and other links on YT that may help with your decision Jimmy, though US looks similar to one that I saw on my search.
These are the type of thing I was looking at, there are a few models available

Maybe the answer is to but it from Amazon, then if it's no good you can return it :cool:
That model is currently out of stock


So considering this:

 

PhilP

G Scale, 7/8th's, Electronics
5 Jun 2013
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My thoughts on that machine:
No fixed fence/guide.
Infinitely variable, so you need to set up accurately.
An adjustable work-stop would be useful for repetitive items..
 

jimmielx

45mm gauge track - approx 16mm scale (1:19)
24 Oct 2009
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Hastings, UK
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I've got the Katsu one. I've found it very useful, but agree with everything PhilP has said above.
When doing multiple repeated cuts I mounted it on a board and screwed my own stop down.
It's a reasonably inexpensive tool, so you get what you pay for.
Mine was mostly bought to cut the aluminium for this bridge.
IMG_6904.jpeg
It's done many other jobs since. Happy with mine.
 

JimmyB

Semi-Retired; more time for trains.
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I've got the Katsu one. I've found it very useful, but agree with everything PhilP has said above.
When doing multiple repeated cuts I mounted it on a board and screwed my own stop down.
It's a reasonably inexpensive tool, so you get what you pay for.
Mine was mostly bought to cut the aluminium for this bridge.
View attachment 287898
It's done many other jobs since. Happy with mine.
James, many thanks, as with all these things, you get what you pay for. I have a large 12 inch compound mitre saw, but still need to set my own stops for some tasks, as the built in devices are always limited.
 

Dan

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28 Jan 2010
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I got my mini CHOP saw from Harbor freight in the USA for under $30.00 and I have cut brass LGB track many times over the years and still have the original blade in the saw. I also have the mini table saw.
 

jimmielx

45mm gauge track - approx 16mm scale (1:19)
24 Oct 2009
708
26
Hastings, UK
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The Proxxon looks like a nicer tool than the Katsu - it is a good bit more expensive though. Guess it depends what and how much use it will get.