Lubrication Oil

Ferrysteam

Ferrysteam

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25 Oct 2009
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Co Durham
I looked up references to the acidity of 3 in 1, can you point to some information about this. Not disagreeing with you, but could not find ANY reference to acidity of 3 in 1...

Greg
I read it on here a while back , '3 in 1 is the clock menders friend', seems it wears out bearings quicker being acidic but I am only referring to what I have read.
 
Rhinochugger

Rhinochugger

Retired Oik
27 Oct 2009
24,506
312
North West Norfolk
Castrol R.....................................................to a REAL motorcyclist what coal and oil and steam is to a steam locomotive nut.
Yeah, great smell but a single grade 40 oil - try kicking a 500cc single on a frosty morning when it's running on 'R' - takes a bit of starting :whew::whew::whew::whew:
 
Greg Elmassian

Greg Elmassian

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Thanks, I looked all over the net, now about 1 hour accumulated, and cannot find a lot of explicit negatives on 3 in 1, and no references to acidity.

But I can find people stating it thickens over time, and the fact that it is a CLP type lubricant (cleans lubricates protects), that there must be more "active" ingredients

Also, it's never been proven it is plastic compatible (although hard to find definite evidence that it damaged plastic)

My personal take, over the years, is that it is fine on stuff that needs maintenance and frequent oiling, not on plastic, and not on precision mechanisms like clocks and watches.

Greg
 
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Paul M

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25 Oct 2016
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I read it on here a while back , '3 in 1 is the clock menders friend', seems it wears out bearings quicker being acidic but I am only referring to what I have read.
As Greg said, 3in1 isn't a good idea for clocks as it's too thick and spreads around, which is probably good on a motion but on anything delicate can clog up thearly workings. Clock gears aren't usually oiled, only the bearings and sprinns.
 
T

Trainman 864

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24 Sep 2015
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As somebody said earlier - it depends on the environment. My preference for dusty environments, like ground level tracks on dry sandy soil, I would use a thinner oil applied more frequently to act like a total loss system - continually flushing out contaminates.

For a cleaner situation - like on a raised track in a sheltered location - I would go for a thicker oil applied less frequently - maybe motor oil or 3-in-1.

And for an ultra clean location - possibly indoors - well away from carpet and house dust - even chain saw oil applied infrequently with its tenacious ability to stick to anything - maybe thinned with a little 3-in1 to reduce friction.
 
65 1057

65 1057

Railways @ 1.435 mm/ 1.000 mm/ 750 mm and 45mm
9 May 2018
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Berlin
Very famous, even mystical in Germany is the weapon-oil BALLISTOL - since 1904 well known for its wide range of use.
It cleans / lubricates / protects horses from insects and (who knows?) works as hair restorer and contraceptive...


Andreas
 
PhilP

PhilP

G Scale, 7/8th's, Electronics
5 Jun 2013
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Contraceptive? - Presumably, you can't keep hold of the young lady concerned? :eek::tmi::tmi:
:giggle::giggle::giggle:
 
Greg Elmassian

Greg Elmassian

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Thier site says "safe on MOST plastics".... clearly it has been shown to be not safe on some plastics.... so I won't gamble... and putting the stuff on a horse seems pretty weird... in the video they show a bottle of it that says "animal" but there seems to only be one version now, and it is mixed with water for some uses...


interesting and even weirder than WD-40....

Greg
 
tac foley

tac foley

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11 Apr 2017
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Ballistol has been used as a mild astringent and instant treatment for scrapes and grazes on humans, me included, since it was first issued to the Imperial German Army in 1905 or thereabouts. Sure, it stings - more than a bit - but I healed without a mark every time. It really is THE general purpose cleaner/lubricator for the outdoor shooter, and in spite of Greg's timely warning that it is safe from 'some' plastics', that's never bothered me, since I'm not made of any kind of plastic. I've been using it on ALL my guns, nitro and black powder, since late 1978, as a cleaner and bore preserver. Our late friend Joe used it on his horses for fetlock sprains and mild tendonitis, but then he also used it on my poor old busted ankles after a day walking around fixing fences. I smole a good deal, but then it was so overpowering that I couldn't smell it. Herself used to make me stand in the porch shower for as much time as it took to reduce somewhat....

Does it work as a lubricant/cleaner? You judge - this is the bore of one of my 1862 Canadian Snider rifles -

125985_5d64f837d26388a3c8d994638e67c68b.jpg


I think that even the fussiest Sergeant Major would be happy with that.
 
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PhilP

PhilP

G Scale, 7/8th's, Electronics
5 Jun 2013
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Tamworth, Staffs.
I see a speck.. :eek:

No, hold that! It's my monitor that is filthy! :blush::rolleyes:
 
John Solimine

John Solimine

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24 Sep 2017
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USA
Where there is moisture or oil, graphite is usually not a good choice, it cakes up into a goo that really does not lubricate.

On sparkies, I have seen where this "goo" actually created a short on an insulated wheel
I appreciate Greg's heads up on the perils of graphite. Truth is, what I know about lubricants can be summed up in one word... and the word is, "nothing." However, in the spirit of conversation, I offer these observations.

One observation regarding Ballistol: It reminds me of the miracle, multi-use oil known as DMSO.

Second observation regarding petroleum: Since both plastic and petroleum oil are made from the same thing, it makes sense that one could dissolve the other.

Third observation: And this one I'm quite certain is correct > castor oil from castor beans is the best lubricant for high performance two cycle engines. Also richer mixtures produce more power.

Forth and last.... Starrett / Webber precision gage blocks (metrology tools) are preserved with light coatings of mineral oil.
 
T

Trainman 864

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24 Sep 2015
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..................... However, in the spirit of conversation, I offer these observations.

Second observation regarding petroleum: Since both plastic and petroleum oil are made from the same thing, it makes sense that one could dissolve the other.
The molecular manipulations that go into the making of the various products from crude oil could easily render them mutually insoluble.

Third observation: And this one I'm quite certain is correct > castor oil from castor beans is the best lubricant for high performance two cycle engines. Also richer mixtures produce more power.
Not so. 'richer mixtures' - by which I assume you mean other than stoichiometric mixtures - result in unburnt fuel and consequent loss of power.
 
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phils2um

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11 Sep 2015
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Ann Arbor, Michigan
Thread drift warning!
I believe John Solimine is correct about the rich mixture producing more power. If memory serves correctly this is due to the poor, non-homogeneous air/fuel mixing that occurs in most 2 cycle engines. Excess fuel is required to make the most of consuming oxygen in the air/fuel charge thus giving maximum energy released per combustion cycle. Not the most efficient due to unburned fuel but does give the most power.

Phil S.
 
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John Solimine

John Solimine

Registered
24 Sep 2017
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USA
The molecular manipulations that go into the making of the various products from crude oil could easily render them mutually insoluble.



Not so. 'richer mixtures' - by which I assume you mean other than stoichiometric mixtures - result in unburnt fuel and consequent loss of power.
Boy oh boy, it's tough around here.

Re: richer mixtures. I meant oil to fuel mixture ratios, not the air to fuel (stoichiometric) ratios. However, richer oil ratios cause leaner stoichiometric ratios and require increased fuel delivery (larger passages) because the oil displaces the fuel.

As far as oil on plastics, my comment was simply intuitive.
 
trammayo

trammayo

Interested in vintage commercial vehicle, trams, t
24 Oct 2009
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I seem to remember Castor Oil as a child :) - by the spoonfull!