LGB cattle car

B

Blackreed

Dan Black
14 Aug 2019
20
34
49
Pennsylvania
Good day all,

After seeing the comments on my stock car, rather than correcting the errors, and before I build a cattle car, I decided to order the cattle car that had been mentioned there in.

Before we get started on the revue of the LGB cattle car, I must explain to you all what the words mean; in the United States, the year of our lord 1906 a law was enacted to protect the meats that were entering our markets, this law required the haulers of said live stock to provide cars that were specifically designed for the cargo that was intended to be hauled.

This basically means that prior to 1906 the car was actually called a stock car, and after 1906 the car would have been named by whatever cargo the car was hauling, ie cattle car etc.

The biggest hardship was not in the cost of so many different rail cars, but in the fact that these cars spent half of their time being pulled empty.

Prior to 1906 the cars doubled for hauling everything from dry goods to railroad ties, so the overall likeness to a box car was far more important to profits than the comfort of the live stock.

So in the picture of the 1860’s stock car and the 1920’s cattle car you can see the true differences.

I have not been able to procure the plans for the D&RGW cattle car, however it is not possible to measure this particular car with the intentions of rebuilding it.

In my opinion this car would have been built after 1920.

I did find it very cool that D&RGW used wood for their cattle cars for such a long time, it seems it would not have mattered, being that the cattle car could not have been over loaded, I guess the biggest issue would have been shear pulling weight.
But it shows that as where coal was a ready commodity, iron ore must have been scarce.

I’m sure for dragging around the back yard and leaving out in the rain for the $20 I spent, I probably wouldn’t care much, as you can see by the pictures the previous owners left it outside. No rust at all, just a bit of fading.

I was excited to see the couplers and the trucks, it turns out that the trucks are plastic, as are the wheels. The couplers are kadee, they are offset.

The brake system is very cool, it is molded in, although the cylinder looks like it can be removed.

The wood that is being used is basically 2 inches by whatever, and there is no framing of any kind under the car.

I did notice on the real D&RGW’s car that the car sits very low on the trucks. I assume this is because of curve radius, however it allows for no brake chain, and no possibility of adding one.

I also noticed on this car and the actual car that the trucks have been spread as far as possible. I’m sure this really helps with stability at speed. Most likely pointing out that both this car and the one in the picture could be a much later version.

The fact that the entire car is built with 2 inch by 4 inch boards makes it nothing like the original car. This is pretty much seen throughout the car.

The doors are functional, I do really like the door stops, they are the same as the original. The door tracks are nothing like the original car, and the door handle places the operator in between the car and the loading ramp.

All of the grab irons are just molded in, I’m sure replacing them would take very little effort, as well as extending the brake wheel.
The car seems to roll just fine, nothing like the Bachman’s metal trucks and wheels, however just fine.

So as far as a backyard runner, it looks like it’s going to work just great, but as a static display it’s going to take quite a bit of work to earn it’s own shelf.

I was very surprised by the weight, I suspected that it was going to be heavy, as I read that hand built cars tend to need weights added to them, it turns out that the hand built car is 3 times heavier, even with the metal trucks and wheels removed the hand made car is heavier.

It is a beautiful car made in Germany and if I had an actual lay out I would enjoy running the wheels off of it.

Dan
131434_3978765d0fe532ae6530da56f96d64be.jpeg
131437_4ae48e14d0827a66f72ecaafd876a98b.jpeg
131438_50ba3294554ba18824ddac0b13d7c341.jpeg
131440_a4eb22b6320a0a1a97c45e138950b2e9.jpeg
 
P

phils2um

Phil S
11 Sep 2015
381
171
Ann Arbor, Michigan
The one on the right for giraffes or just long horns?
 
  • Like
Reactions: lgbmad
B

Blackreed

Dan Black
14 Aug 2019
20
34
49
Pennsylvania
Phil,
What a great question, for someone that can not read you seem to navigate through this website well.
Taking a look at the average height of a giraffe, that’s 19 feet, for both male and female, and with an average neck length of 6 feet for both male and female, that means if you cut the neck off at the body, you would still need to break the legs of the giraffe to get it into the car on the right.
Now the smaller car made by LGB, not even a baby giraffe would fit in that car.
Now reading comprehension should tell you that the LGB car can only be used as a cattle car because it would have been registered as a cattle car, now being that I was researching the Goodyear’s at the time of building the car on the right, I wanted to placard the car as hog car 1, however the law would not allow me to do that, so I refrained.

Now Phil take a look at why the laws, or restrictions were placed on the railroad and I do not only mean the car usage, but all labor laws as well, I would think it be a blessing that we are not using these cars for multiple purposes any longer. I am imagining the small children packing potatoes into a three deck hog car, well just take a lesson from your local nurses for the reparations from that. Everybody’s gotta eat.
So I guess it comes to this Phil, I’m going to continue building from the incredible plans provided by John White, and am not going to allow LGB or any others to dictate my railroad, or my right of ways.
I do hope to see your railroad some day, this is very exciting for me to get a chance to share the models and to see the incredible talent that this site has, unfortunately for me, through the times I’ve lost so many photos, and I would rather continue building my hobby and skills, rather than driving all over America trying to get reacquainted with all the models and dioramas I’ve built. Actually Phil it would kill me to have to pay to go visit my models.
And once again thank you for the wonderful question.

You be responsible with your drinking, and have a great day.
Dan
 
PhilP

PhilP

G Scale, 7/8th's, Electronics
5 Jun 2013
24,008
674
Tamworth, Staffs.
I don't care what you put in it! - It is a beautiful model!! :):clap::clap:
 
B

Blackreed

Dan Black
14 Aug 2019
20
34
49
Pennsylvania
Thank you
 
P

Paul M

Registered
25 Oct 2016
3,528
339
56
Royston
Research is all. It's also very apparent how much better real wood looks as opposed to moulded plastic. A smashing model
 
P

phils2um

Phil S
11 Sep 2015
381
171
Ann Arbor, Michigan
What a great question, for someone that can not read you seem to navigate through this website well.
Whoa there Dan. Ease off. The giraffe comment was just meant in jest based on the disparity in height between the two wagons. It was not a comment on your modeling skills. By the way, my reading ability is just fine - I even comprehend some of it!

Remember rule 8

Edit added: I just took a look at Dan's "Stock Car" thread for the first time. I would not have repeated it had I realized the giraffe comment was already made.
 
Last edited:
F

Fred Mills

Registered
27 Mar 2017
1,543
145
77
Ottawa/Nepean, Ontario Canada
For anyone truly interested; you might note that on the LGB "Cattle car/stock car", there is a small "D" at the end of the car number. On the prototype car, this indicates that the car has a second deck, although the model does not have one. The second deck was used for sheep loading, increasing the number of animals the car could accommodate.
The model looks much better when body mounted Kadee couplers are properly mounted, as those truck mounted offset shanks look like hell and are not in any way prototypical...however...whatever turns your crank, the saying goes....!!!
 
voodoopenguin

voodoopenguin

Registered
20 Jul 2015
822
357
68
Blofield, Norfolk
Edit added: I just took a look at Dan's "Stock Car" thread for the first time. I would not have repeated it had I realized the giraffe comment was already made.
I was the one who made the original giraffe reference. I have been sorting through my Tri-ang collection and just that day had been testing that my giraffe car worked. For those who don't know them, the giraffe ducks down to avoid bridges.

Paul

131502_0f6840248743ae06bc364c4a9ae6311e.jpg
 
  • Like
Reactions: phils2um
beavercreek

beavercreek

Travel, Art, Theatre, Music, Photography, Trains
24 Oct 2009
17,389
78
East Anglia
www.facebook.com
There is the Bachmann model as well, which is actually more true to the D&RGW than the LGB variety if a little customisation is applied.
I used the Bachmann model for my motorised helpers (motor blocks with DCC control on board) and also to customise them to appear more how the D&RGW ran them.
( a run down of how I did the transformation is here: Motorising of some rolling stock to 'help' weak locos up slopes. - G Scale Central)

I chose the Bachmann version to customise and motorise over the LGB jobbie because, firstly , the name boards are easy to remove for replacement and secondly, it has one feature that made the the motorising a little easier...a removable floor!

They all have QSI \live action' sound cards that 'moo' more when the car is moving.


Bachmann stock car as it is out of the box

131510_e3052420a33fa30933baef52a6adfa91.jpg



The modified and customised stockcars stationed and passing the old and now replaced stockyard at 'Pointrock' township

131504_9cba7ba9ab70b1eb4f9991e602bdc8d8.jpg




One of the customised stock cars stationed at the more recent wooden updated stockyard at 'Pointrock' township.

131508_bad8b38c831f28c2d32bdbff3e081730.jpg
 

Attachments

  • Like
Reactions: lgbmad
maxi-model

maxi-model

UK/US/ROW steam narrow gauge railways 1:1
27 Oct 2009
4,659
198
Bucks/Oxon/Northants area
And there are the AMS (Accucraft) Fn3 versions too - they did both the cattle and the sheep (giraffes with very short necks and legs, both are ungulates) double deck, versions. They are arguably the most accurate of the larger scale mainstream offerings.

I agree that all wood construction of wagons has a certain quality that grained plastic cannot achieve, having built a few woodies, Hartford and Rio Grande included. However when running them it barely notices at a modest distance. Pity. Max
 
P

Paul M

Registered
25 Oct 2016
3,528
339
56
Royston
However when running them it barely notices at a modest distance. Pity. Max
The 6 foot rule, or even better with my efforts the 12 foot and round the corner rule