LGB 1235 3 Way Point

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dunnyrail

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There was a version with a single point motor, only suitable for indoors. This single motor could easily be replaced with 2 EPL motors though.

AFAIK, the geometry was identical....
Yes there was a wierd one with 2 blades and 1 motor as shown above , I had one and sold it on via the 16mm show at Peterborough one year. Never could fathom out how it worked but removing the motor and making it work on Air would have been good for me. But as I think one of the routes or possibly both were R1 I did not find it of use for my line. Though since then I have had to put an R1 xover in for my ET Station (it is hidden from normal view) and it is a real pain with 2 of my locomotives.

Hm reading Soft’s notes and my memory not sure if 2 air motors would have worked the original, perhaps I worked that out long ago and that is why I outed it.
 

dunnyrail

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As this thread has morphed into a discussion about Slips I thought that this may be of interest. This new LGB profile point looks very interesting, being to LGB R3, I assume that it will match an LGB R3 point in its geometry. I have looked on the Heyn website but could not find it to link a picture.

Listed in Gartenbahn Profi 2/2022

A new double slip switch is available from the Heyn model workshop. It has the LGB R3 radius on both sides so that slim track geometry are possible. The radius is 22.5°; two straights each have a length of 478 mm. The switch has two brass frogs and cast switch tongues, which were designed as a 3D model and cast as components using the lost-wax process. What is special about this form of crossing is that there is a middle rail that is used by both arches on the outside of the diverging position. Two pairs of tongues are coupled to each other in such a way that all possible diverging routes can be switched by two switch levers. This means that exactly one crossing is always possible. The frogs have to have an additional switch on the switch for frog polarity to electrify the route. The slip switch is available as a kit for €195 including sleeper bed, or as a complete crossing for €310.
 

Gizzy

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As this thread has morphed into a discussion about Slips I thought that this may be of interest. This new LGB profile point looks very interesting, being to LGB R3, I assume that it will match an LGB R3 point in its geometry. I have looked on the Heyn website but could not find it to link a picture.

Listed in Gartenbahn Profi 2/2022

A new double slip switch is available from the Heyn model workshop. It has the LGB R3 radius on both sides so that slim track geometry are possible. The radius is 22.5°; two straights each have a length of 478 mm. The switch has two brass frogs and cast switch tongues, which were designed as a 3D model and cast as components using the lost-wax process. What is special about this form of crossing is that there is a middle rail that is used by both arches on the outside of the diverging position. Two pairs of tongues are coupled to each other in such a way that all possible diverging routes can be switched by two switch levers. This means that exactly one crossing is always possible. The frogs have to have an additional switch on the switch for frog polarity to electrify the route. The slip switch is available as a kit for €195 including sleeper bed, or as a complete crossing for €310.
I think you mean this one JD....

 

dunnyrail

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Flying15

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I've mentioned on this forum that I have an LGB R3 three way point, which I believe is quite rare. (The current LGB offering is R1. I have a few of these useful space saving switches on my railway.)

I brought this point many years ago on Ebay for a good price, but in those early days, I didn't realise it was R3 and 22.5 deg, so it didn't fit with my R1 points as I wanted.

I brought a 2nd hand R3 point from Adverse Camber and I used it on my first layout, before i moved.

I also used it on my current layout at Pip's Junction. However, it is showing its age, so I am relocating it to the station throat scissors crossing, replacing the current set-up using R1 points, with R3.

I've had to repair the sleeper ends where the point levers/motors attach. here's a photo or 2 of this rare beast....

View attachment 310304
Just a term issue, for those of us that suffer from anoraksia. My friends with a real railway background refer to what we modellers in the UK refer to as points as ‘turn outs’ telling me a point is that part where the rails meet (at the crossing)is the point. Equally what we call a three way point is known as a tandem.
 

JimmyB

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Just a term issue, for those of us that suffer from anoraksia. My friends with a real railway background refer to what we modellers in the UK refer to as points as ‘turn outs’ telling me a point is that part where the rails meet (at the crossing)is the point. Equally what we call a three way point is known as a tandem.
Yes and in the USA they are switches, and I think you mean you are a pedant ;)
 

Flying15

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Yes and in the USA they are switches, and I think you mean you are a pedant ;)
Not a pedant, but sharing a bit of humour. In the UK an Anorak, whilst a piece of clothing, is also a term used to describe any one who might be obsessive and particularly rail enthusiasts!
 

JimmyB

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In the UK an Anorak, whilst a piece of clothing, is also a term used to describe any one who might be obsessive and particularly rail enthusiasts!
Hopefully after 69 years in the UK I should know that, but then I am a pedant.

"Anorak" /ˈænəræk/ is a British slang term which refers to a person who has a very strong interest, perhaps obsessive, in niche subjects. This interest may be unacknowledged or not understood by the general public.
A pedant is a person who is excessively concerned with formalism, accuracy and precision, or one who makes an ostentatious and arrogant show of learning. ;)
 

dunnyrail

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Hopefully after 69 years in the UK I should know that, but then I am a pedant.

"Anorak" /ˈænəræk/ is a British slang term which refers to a person who has a very strong interest, perhaps obsessive, in niche subjects. This interest may be unacknowledged or not understood by the general public.
A pedant is a person who is excessively concerned with formalism, accuracy and precision, or one who makes an ostentatious and arrogant show of learning. ;)
I think the term Anorak for Railway Enthusiasts appeared around the 70/80’s when large amounts of bods at the end of Station platforms gathering Loco/Carriage/Wagon Numbers were observed nearly all wearing the blue Anoraks that were All the rage with those types in the day. It has of course been taken into the lexicon and is used to describe anyone these days who could be obsessed with their hobby/interest. Though I doubt it is much used among golfing circles, but I frequently describe obsessive golfers as ‘Golfing Anoraks’.
 

Gizzy

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I think the term Anorak for Railway Enthusiasts appeared around the 70/80’s when large amounts of bods at the end of Station platforms....
I believe Anorak is a word adopted in the English language from the Eskimos
 

dunnyrail

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So does that mean we are both right then?
 

Hal Farsed

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Hmm. Worked on the railway since 1984, never heard "turnout" used. Points or S&C for me. Never heard "frog" either. crossing or crossing nose. Ho Hum...
 

dunnyrail

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Hmm. Worked on the railway since 1984, never heard "turnout" used. Points or S&C for me. Never heard "frog" either. crossing or crossing nose. Ho Hum...
If you read a US Model Railway Magazine they use turnout all the time, hence some on here quite familiar with the term by reading the sadly demised Garden Railways US based mag. Frog much used in modelling circles since at least the 50’s when I first encountered it. During my short term contracting for Balfour Beattie in the 2000’s, till I got used to official railway track terms I occasionally confused with my Modelling terminology, fortunately one of the managers owned a Model Railway Shop and was able to translate for me and others in the office.
 

Paul M

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I wonder why modelling circles used different terminology to real life?
 

dunnyrail

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I wonder why modelling circles used different terminology to real life?
Where is the confused emoji when you need it?
 

Hal Farsed

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If you read a US Model Railway Magazine they use turnout all the time, hence some on here quite familiar with the term by reading the sadly demised Garden Railways US based mag. Frog much used in modelling circles since at least the 50’s when I first encountered it. During my short term contracting for Balfour Beattie in the 2000’s, till I got used to official railway track terms I occasionally confused with my Modelling terminology, fortunately one of the managers owned a Model Railway Shop and was able to translate for me and others in the office.

Interesting.
 
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switches (made of rails) got confused with switches (things that control electricity)

using turnouts eliminated the confusion

we also use "points" for the ends of the moving part of a turnout, as opposed to the whole turnout.