Lazy Grange Bay 3...a new start

Jasper

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About 26...any more and the weight of the tankers creates the draw string effect..it literally pulls the waggons of the rail on the curves
That's easy to prevent... Just fill them with oil.
 

Greg Elmassian

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Actually, it's not the weight that causes "stringlining" but the rolling friction that pulls them off the track. More weight would help provided you did not dramatically increase friction.

Unfortunately, unless you have ball bearing wheels, the two are entertwined. Have been experimenting a lot as I have a 14 car passenger train that wants to stringline... turns out the carbon brushes on the wheelsets was causing excessive friction, could run a 14 car streamliner but not the 14 car heavyweight, both by USAT, what looked to be identical trucks... but they were not.

Greg
 

Paul M

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Of course us poorer members of the forum, don't have such problems :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:
 

Jasper

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Such a long train would look totally out of place on my small tramway.
 

mike

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More Weight, and I would have to use a more powerful loco. Or double head..
Strangly it's not the friction but the weight of the load pulling the waggons off ..I am using relivtly sharp bends ie R2 , 20210908_104048.jpg
 

Greg Elmassian

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I would submit that it's not weight unless you are accelerating.... weight more a factor there, UNLESS you are going up a grade.

Think on it a bit... what is pulling back against the loco the most, the weight on the flat or the friction.... just like the prototype...

Greg
 

dunnyrail

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Rhinochugger

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More Weight, and I would have to use a more powerful loco. Or double head..
Strangly it's not the friction but the weight of the load pulling the waggons off ..I am using relivtly sharp bends ie R2 , View attachment 289803
Ooh, needs a helper at the rear - or as we say in England, a banking engine >:)
 
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mike

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Must have taken an age to get them all out and into the tracks.
It dose, hence them running all day...
Some are left permanently out doors 7 or 8 have been outside for 2 years and are weathering nicely..moss on them..
 

dunnyrail

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Ooh, needs a helper at the rear - or as we say in England, a banking engine >:)
I think the term on other than a gradient is “Assisting Engine” sometimes the term is used for a banking engine also. Old time Railway that is, pre 1994 they probably have a different fancy name now.
 

Rhinochugger

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I think the term on other than a gradient is “Assisting Engine” sometimes the term is used for a banking engine also. Old time Railway that is, pre 1994 they probably have a different fancy name now.
Yeah, a banking engine was mainly for gradients, which was, I s'pose more common, otherwise we went in for double-heading, which wouldn't help with Mike's string :oops::oops:
 

mike

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Its been a rather warm evening..
24degrees, September, in the UK...

20210910_200639.jpg
 

Jasper

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It took me a bit to wrap my head around the term "banking engine". But I think I get it: there's "river bank", so....a bank is an incline. Funny language y'all have.
 
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Paul M

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Yes it's an engine that is usually stored at the bottom of an incline, that is used to give heavy trains a helping push. Also sometimes as extra braking for going down
 

Jasper

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I'm familiar with the concept of a helper engine. It's just the term "banking engine" that's new to me.
 
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Rhinochugger

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I'm familiar with the concept of a helper engine. It's just the term "banking engine" that's new to me.
Yes, in railway terminology, steep inclines were often referred to as banks, and there were quite a few where an extra engine was kept to give trains a push up the hill.

In Britain, some locos were designed principally as banking engines; the LMS 'Big Bertha' was one, while the SR 'Z' class gained a second lease of life as a banking engine outside Exeter.