Jackoboard

Revok

Revok

Registered
19 Jun 2018
37
101
62
West Sussex, UK
#1
I have been getting my bathroom redecorated, and the guy was using 'Jackoboard'. Its 10mm thick, looks like compressed foam with a rigid surface and strengthened with a netting lattice running through it, and is highly water repellant. It cuts easily, and I was thinking it might make a good base for my railway buildings to sit on. Has anyone used jackoboard for anything, is it good/bad?
 
ebay mike

ebay mike

Registered
6 Dec 2011
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443
Norfolk
#2
Never heard of it but just Googled it - it ain't cheap.
 
Revok

Revok

Registered
19 Jun 2018
37
101
62
West Sussex, UK
#3
I'd never heard of it before either. But I have 2 sheets of roughly 5ft x 2ft which was left over. I thought I might be able to use it to sit my station on, and extended outwards to give a flat platform for figures. And also because its foam, I could easily make small holes for my lampposts.
 
G-force1

G-force1

Prevarication Rules!
4 Aug 2015
3,067
1,151
North Middle Earth
#4
I'd never heard of it before either. But I have 2 sheets of roughly 5ft x 2ft which was left over. I thought I might be able to use it to sit my station on, and extended outwards to give a flat platform for figures. And also because its foam, I could easily make small holes for my lampposts.
I've never heard of it either. Sounds like a 'suck-it-and-see' job.
 
Madman

Madman

Registered
25 Oct 2009
12,585
1,997
Pennsylvania, USA
#5
Jackoboard. Comes from the infamous Jackalope.


The jackalope is a mythical animal of North American folklore (a fearsome critter) described as a jackrabbit with antelope horns. The word "jackalope" is a portmanteau of "jackrabbit" and "antelope", although the jackrabbit is not a rabbit, and the pronghorn is not an antelope. Many jackalope taxidermy mounts, including the original, are made with deer antlers.
In the 1930s, Douglas Herrick and his brother, hunters with taxidermy skills, popularized the American jackalope by grafting deer antlers onto a jackrabbit carcass and selling the combination to a local hotel in Douglas, Wyoming. Thereafter, they made and sold many similar jackalopes to a retail outlet in South Dakota, and another taxidermist continues to manufacture the horned rabbits in the 21st century. Stuffed and mounted, jackalopes are found in many bars and other places in the United States; stores catering to tourists sell jackalope postcards and other paraphernalia, and commercial entities in America and elsewhere have used the word "jackalope" or a jackalope logo as part of their marketing strategies. The jackalope has appeared in published stories, poems, television shows, video games, and a low-budget mockumentary film. The Wyoming Legislature has considered bills to make the jackalope the state's official mythological creature.
The underlying legend of the jackalope, upon which the Wyoming taxidermists were building, may be related to similar stories in other cultures and other historical times. Researchers suggest that at least some of the tales of horned hares were inspired by sightings of rabbits infected with the Shope papilloma virus. It causes horn- and antler-like tumors to grow in various places on a rabbit's head and body.
Folklorists see the jackalope as one of a group of fabled creatures common to American culture since Colonial days. These appear in tall tales about hodags, giant turtles, Bigfoot, and many other mysterious beasts and in novels like Moby-Dick. The tales lend themselves to comic hoaxing by entrepreneurs who seek attention for their products, their persons, or their towns.
 
ebay mike

ebay mike

Registered
6 Dec 2011
2,039
443
Norfolk
#6
Jackoboard. Comes from the infamous Jackalope.


The jackalope is a mythical animal of North American folklore (a fearsome critter) described as a jackrabbit with antelope horns. The word "jackalope" is a portmanteau of "jackrabbit" and "antelope", although the jackrabbit is not a rabbit, and the pronghorn is not an antelope. Many jackalope taxidermy mounts, including the original, are made with deer antlers.
In the 1930s, Douglas Herrick and his brother, hunters with taxidermy skills, popularized the American jackalope by grafting deer antlers onto a jackrabbit carcass and selling the combination to a local hotel in Douglas, Wyoming. Thereafter, they made and sold many similar jackalopes to a retail outlet in South Dakota, and another taxidermist continues to manufacture the horned rabbits in the 21st century. Stuffed and mounted, jackalopes are found in many bars and other places in the United States; stores catering to tourists sell jackalope postcards and other paraphernalia, and commercial entities in America and elsewhere have used the word "jackalope" or a jackalope logo as part of their marketing strategies. The jackalope has appeared in published stories, poems, television shows, video games, and a low-budget mockumentary film. The Wyoming Legislature has considered bills to make the jackalope the state's official mythological creature.
The underlying legend of the jackalope, upon which the Wyoming taxidermists were building, may be related to similar stories in other cultures and other historical times. Researchers suggest that at least some of the tales of horned hares were inspired by sightings of rabbits infected with the Shope papilloma virus. It causes horn- and antler-like tumors to grow in various places on a rabbit's head and body.
Folklorists see the jackalope as one of a group of fabled creatures common to American culture since Colonial days. These appear in tall tales about hodags, giant turtles, Bigfoot, and many other mysterious beasts and in novels like Moby-Dick. The tales lend themselves to comic hoaxing by entrepreneurs who seek attention for their products, their persons, or their towns.
So you're implying it's a folklore based foam board akin to that used by Mike (one of the mods) to construct his wonderful structures. Is it suitable for vegetarians as you don't actually eat it? Is Mike's recently finished lock complex likely to sprout ears or worse still horns? Will it develop a furry skin? Should one purchase and use this product is there a likelihood of being 'stuffed and mounted' in a bar as detailed above? The mind boggles.
 
stockers

stockers

Trains, aircraft, models, walking, beer, travel
Staff member
GSC Moderator
24 Oct 2009
25,278
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60
Nr. Ashford, Kent. England.
#7
Another trade name is Aquaboard or Aquapanel - it is like plasterboard but reasonably waterproof. I have used it for my platforms with some success. It is now about 7 years old and the edges are just beginning to crumble a little. Available from the sheds - like B&Q, cuts with a old handsaw but buggers the blade so use an old one. Jigsaw for curves.

110335_6bfbae936ea34b8534fcc300af5765e7.jpg
 
Rhinochugger

Rhinochugger

Retired Oik
27 Oct 2009
22,934
3,084
North West Norfolk
#8
So you're implying it's a folklore based foam board akin to that used by Mike (one of the mods) to construct his wonderful structures. Is it suitable for vegetarians as you don't actually eat it? Is Mike's recently finished lock complex likely to sprout ears or worse still horns? Will it develop a furry skin? Should one purchase and use this product is there a likelihood of being 'stuffed and mounted' in a bar as detailed above? The mind boggles.
Did you say something about Mike being stuffed and mounted over the bar o_Oo_Oo_Oo_O
 
ebay mike

ebay mike

Registered
6 Dec 2011
2,039
443
Norfolk
#9
Did you say something about Mike being stuffed and mounted over the bar o_Oo_Oo_Oo_O
No Rhino, I wouldn't dare to suggest such a thing as Mike being mounted - Mrs Duffy might have something to say about that. Stuffed? Now that is another matter altogether bearing in mind a certain person's propensity for cake to be produced at the slightest opportunity.
 
dunnyrail

dunnyrail

DOGS, Garden Railways, Steam Trains, Jive Dancing,
25 Oct 2009
13,502
3,128
70
St.Neots Cambridgeshire UK
#11
Another trade name is Aquaboard or Aquapanel - it is like plasterboard but reasonably waterproof. I have used it for my platforms with some success. It is now about 7 years old and the edges are just beginning to crumble a little. Available from the sheds - like B&Q, cuts with a old handsaw but buggers the blade so use an old one. Jigsaw for curves.

View attachment 245611
Wicks do a similar product as well. We had some sheets up on the Ruschbahn Garage for the Rack Railway, it was going to be painted Sky Blue then have Mountains built to it as well. Sadly never got completed before Andy died.
 
PhilP

PhilP

G Scale, 7/8th's, Electronics
5 Jun 2013
21,251
2,455
Tamworth, Staffs.
#12
Used the Wickes product in No.1 D's previous property.. Quite heavy, so won't blow away!