Hull 96

Rhinochugger

Rhinochugger

Retired Oik
27 Oct 2009
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Nice :clap::clap::clap:
 
daveyb

daveyb

badger tickling, sheep worrying
25 Oct 2009
2,879
1
nr st andews scotch land
trams dont really do it for me but its great to see that so many have survived,,,,

looks a really nice job they have done on her
 
G-force1

G-force1

Prevarication Rules!
4 Aug 2015
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I remember at Crich they used to have an old tram side that had been painted as a demonstration of the art. Something like fourteen coats from one end to the other, showing bare wood at one end to the varnish coat at the other. I thought it was very impressive, but last time I was there I looked for it but couldn't find it.
 
PhilP

PhilP

G Scale, 7/8th's, Electronics
5 Jun 2013
22,704
229
Tamworth, Staffs.
I remember at Crich they used to have an old tram side that had been painted as a demonstration of the art. Something like fourteen coats from one end to the other, showing bare wood at one end to the varnish coat at the other. I thought it was very impressive, but last time I was there I looked for it but couldn't find it.
Perhaps someone had finally got round to finishing it!
:rofl::rofl::rofl:
 
trammayo

trammayo

Interested in vintage commercial vehicle, trams, t
24 Oct 2009
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Thanks for posting - it looks nice. A lot different to works grey - one of a rare transfer of a works car from one system to another (Leeds).
 
Dtsteam

Dtsteam

G Scale, Travel, Steam Boats, Mechanical Music
24 Oct 2009
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Preston
Who knows, maybe one day it will get its top deck back, although to be fair probably not whilst its at Heaton Park. Thanks for posting.
 
A

Andrew B. Middleton

Registered
22 Jun 2016
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Beechworth VIC 3747
Hull was I think quite an unusual system in that it had the rail groove in the centre of the rails! That meant the wheels had to have their flanges in the centre of the wheel treads also! I would very much like to see a photo of the tram points also!!
 
dunnyrail

dunnyrail

DOGS, Garden Railways, Steam Trains, Jive Dancing,
25 Oct 2009
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Hull was I think quite an unusual system in that it had the rail groove in the centre of the rails! That meant the wheels had to have their flanges in the centre of the wheel treads also! I would very much like to see a photo of the tram points also!!
Wish I knew that little fact when I visited Hull Museum some time back. Must try to dig out my pics of the Museum, sure there was a little bit of Track on the floor in places.
JonD
 
trammayo

trammayo

Interested in vintage commercial vehicle, trams, t
24 Oct 2009
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Hull was I think quite an unusual system in that it had the rail groove in the centre of the rails! That meant the wheels had to have their flanges in the centre of the wheel treads also! I would very much like to see a photo of the tram points also!!
Doncaster also employed centre groove track. The idea was that it would ease wear on the point blade/s. I cannot remember seeing an image of the pointwork from either town - I have a few books on British trams so I'll have to look them up!
 
dunnyrail

dunnyrail

DOGS, Garden Railways, Steam Trains, Jive Dancing,
25 Oct 2009
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Managed to find my pics, visted back in January 2007 further back than I thought. Oh well some pics.

This pic shows car 132 in the Museum on some Track but not really obvious of the Rail situation.
image.jpg

image.jpg


image.jpg
This must be a Horse Car or perhaps a Steam Tram Trailer.
image.jpg
Copy of a Street View in the Town from the Museum. The light was so poor thus this is not the bset of images to see the Track. But may encourage a visit by a local Centraler to do better.
image.jpg
My real reason to visit was to see this little beuty, one of the three Portstewart Steam that existed. 2 have happily been preserved, this one in Hull and the other at Cultra in Ireland.
image.jpg
JonD
 
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trammayo

trammayo

Interested in vintage commercial vehicle, trams, t
24 Oct 2009
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Managed to find my pics, visted back in January 2007 further back than I thought. Oh well some pics.

This pic shows car 132 in the Museum on some Track but not really obvious of the Rail situation.
View attachment 224608

View attachment 224609


View attachment 224612
This must be a Horse Car or perhaps a Steam Tram Trailer.
View attachment 224613
Copy of a Street View in the Town from the Museum. The light was so poor thus this is not the bset of images to see the Track. But may encourage a visit by a local Centraler to do better.
View attachment 224611
My real reason to visit was to see this little beuty, one of the three Portstewart Steam that existed. 2 have happily been preserved, this one in Hull and the other at Cultra in Ireland.
View attachment 224614
JonD
The single decker is from the Ryde Pier - it has similar windows to G.F.Train's car - I think it was built by Starbucks.
 
Rhinochugger

Rhinochugger

Retired Oik
27 Oct 2009
24,435
290
North West Norfolk
Doncaster also employed centre groove track. The idea was that it would ease wear on the point blade/s. I cannot remember seeing an image of the pointwork from either town - I have a few books on British trams so I'll have to look them up!
I thought most tram track was centre groove, but with traditional flanged wheels. It meant that it could be laid in cobbled setts in the road and the flangeway was protected.
 
trammayo

trammayo

Interested in vintage commercial vehicle, trams, t
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I thought most tram track was centre groove, but with traditional flanged wheels. It meant that it could be laid in cobbled setts in the road and the flangeway was protected.
Ah but - Hull and Doncaster had centre flanged wheels!

Standard tram rail .....

DSCW0001.JPG
and in the case of Doncaster or Hull (of which, I don't have a sample), the groove would be central and the running rails would be either side.

Incidentally, Steel rails were some of the first items to be standardised in Britain.
 
Rhinochugger

Rhinochugger

Retired Oik
27 Oct 2009
24,435
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Ah but - Hull and Doncaster had centre flanged wheels!

Standard tram rail .....

View attachment 224629
and in the case of Doncaster or Hull (of which, I don't have a sample), the groove would be central and the running rails would be either side.

Incidentally, Steel rails were some of the first items to be standardised in Britain.
Oh - fascinating

So the old Matchbox / Yesteryear model wasn't all that wrong (except it was meant to be a London tram) :smoke::smoke::smoke::smoke::smoke::smoke::smoke:
 
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dunnyrail

dunnyrail

DOGS, Garden Railways, Steam Trains, Jive Dancing,
25 Oct 2009
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I have a rather nice short length of possibly Luton Tram Track, well it was obtained in Luton anyway. 15 inches long by 6.5 inches tall being as how you asked. Would love to do a slither of it like Mick's, however the thought of all that Hacksawing.....
image.jpg
JonD
 
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trammayo

trammayo

Interested in vintage commercial vehicle, trams, t
24 Oct 2009
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I have a rather nice short length of possibly Luton Tram Track, well it was obtained in Luton anyway. 15 inches long by 6.5 inches tall being as how you asked. Would love to do a slither of it like Mick's, however the thought of all that Hacksawing.....
View attachment 224664
JonD
I used to collect short lengths of rail. A mechanical hacksaw (reciprocating type) cuts nice slices. However, that particular sample was made, no doubt, by apprentices at Dorman Long in 1936 for Leeds City Tramways as a sample.

Even with standardised rail (and there were many different standards), many systems had their own tyre profiles - as they did with trolley wheels. There was no economy of build scale with a standard design tramcar - virtually every tramway system ordered its own design.

And that's where Leyland came in with their buses..... the rest is history.
 
Rhinochugger

Rhinochugger

Retired Oik
27 Oct 2009
24,435
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Slightly off-piste, I used to have a concrete core section that had the 'I' of a steel beam in the middle of it.

Why didn't the building fall down thus weakened? Well, it had been prepared as a bomb proof fortification (second world war) as potential residence for the Royal Family (but never used as such) and it was thought that the 6ft thick reinforced concrete slab was holding up the steel beam :D:D:D:D
 
dunnyrail

dunnyrail

DOGS, Garden Railways, Steam Trains, Jive Dancing,
25 Oct 2009
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I used to collect short lengths of rail. A mechanical hacksaw (reciprocating type) cuts nice slices. However, that particular sample was made, no doubt, by apprentices at Dorman Long in 1936 for Leeds City Tramways as a sample.

Even with standardised rail (and there were many different standards), many systems had their own tyre profiles - as they did with trolley wheels. There was no economy of build scale with a standard design tramcar - virtually every tramway system ordered its own design.

And that's where Leyland came in with their buses..... the rest is history.
Tram eradication in U.K. Is somewhat more complex than just buses.

When many systems were created back in the years of yor, Councils and Towns used to put in some kind of Clause that the system would revert to their ownership after nn years. Result of this dumb policy was that owners would gradually run the system down towards the end of their time. Thus a broken or at least poorly maintained system generally in need of new vehicles was taken over. Run to death and profits if any used to subsidise the rates with the inevitable solution that the system could not be afford to be kept running or upgraded thus Busses took over. Further closures of well maintained systems occurred as Town thought that Trams were 'old fashioned' thus closing them to leave us with just Blackpool at a drastically reduced and useful size. The rest is History.

Enter John Prescott with a renewed passion for 10 or Tram Systems, some even getting to the state where Rails were bought (Liverpool) only to have the plug pulled by Alistair Darling with the excuse that the systems were unaffordable at the moment. As if they would ever be cheaper. The reality was it was that he needed the Money to pay for Tony Blairs various vanity wars that have given us so much Terrorism in recent years.

Now we have the DOT playing allah with Tram Train, Hydrogen Buses and Battery everything. Good old fashioned Trams powered by Electricity are what is needed to resolve the issues of many Towns as Croydon, Blackpool, Manchester, Nottingham, Birmingham, Edinburgh and Wolverhampton are discovering. But at silly costs due to a previous Governments ill thought out policy of saddling Utility Changes on the System during build. These of course are charged at Gold Rated Prices by Privatised mostly foreign owned Utility Companies.

Wow what a rant!
JonD