Hi, I'm new here and crawling my way through I have a lot of LGB trains and need help with how to maintain them, where to apply oil/clean brass tracks

M

Mrb1632

Registered
12 Feb 2020
1
0
71
Staten Island New York
Hi, I new to this site and having trouble navigating...lol...I have a lot of LGB trains, and I would appreciate someone telling me how to oil them and clean the brass tracks, I also have accessories that I don't know how to use...can you help me...Thank You...Larry
 
dunnyrail

dunnyrail

DOGS, Garden Railways, Steam Trains, Jive Dancing,
25 Oct 2009
16,306
1,049
71
St.Neots Cambridgeshire UK
Hi, I new to this site and having trouble navigating...lol...I have a lot of LGB trains, and I would appreciate someone telling me how to oil them and clean the brass tracks, I also have accessories that I don't know how to use...can you help me...Thank You...Larry
For track cleaning an LGB 50040 track cleaning block is as good as it gets. LGB also supply 2 lubes that should be used sparingly, this thread should help.

 
Greg Elmassian

Greg Elmassian

Registered
8 Mar 2014
3,452
352
San Diego
www.elmassian.com
A weighted dry wall sander on a pole lets you stand upright and clean 10 times faster, you can use fine drywall sandpaper, or scotchbrite. Get the pole sander from Home Depot or Lowes, etc.

I have a whole page on several different types of track cleaners that might help you.


Greg
 
P

Paul M

Registered
25 Oct 2016
4,105
538
56
Royston
Hi, I new to this site and having trouble navigating...lol...I have a lot of LGB trains, and I would appreciate someone telling me how to oil them and clean the brass tracks, I also have accessories that I don't know how to use...can you help me...Thank You...Larry
Welcome MrB! You've come to the right place for advice. Don't forget pictures are better than 1000 words, so anything that you don't know the use of, send a picture, and it's guaranteed that some will know!
 
maxi-model

maxi-model

UK/US/ROW steam narrow gauge railways 1:1
27 Oct 2009
4,725
247
Bucks/Oxon/Northants area
Hi Larry. Welcome to the forum. As you are asking about track cleaning already does this mean you have acquired a load of well used 2nd hand equipment that has had, and will have, extensive use outdoors ?

If so, to add to Greg's suggestions, also pay particular attention to the areas where the track components and other electrical equipment associated joins together. Make sure you clean up the track ends and contacts so the metal is bright and then reassemble them applying some form of water ingress protection to these joints (e.g. LGB/Massoth graphite paste) so that the ends do not tarnish and thereby result in diminished electrical conductivity between track sections now or in the future.

Also, before building your line, give some consideration to replacing any conventional track joiners (fishplates) with some form of proprietary track clamp devise (Massoth/Splitjaw) attached directly to the rail. These devices help in the electrical conductivity departement and also minimizing the risk of track formations working loose causing derailments over time.

Which accessories do you require help with ? Max
 
JimmyB

JimmyB

Semi-Retired; more time for trains.
23 Feb 2018
2,543
497
Weston-super-Mare
Larry, welcome to the forum, I am sure if you are specific about items you need help somebody can provide the advice, if needed start numerous threads on different areas where you need assistance, and the appropriate knowledgeable person can zoom in to provide the answer.
 
D

Dan

Registered
28 Jan 2010
279
17
Eastern MA
Outside you must use rail clamps and to add to the list, trainli has clamps with vertical screws which are stainless and easy to get to at switches and crossovers. Indoors I just used the joiners that came with the LGB track. When cleaning track, be sure to polish it, not 'grind' the top. Indoors you will notice black carbon over the years due to electrical sparks. Also use electrical paste at the clamp/joiners as this keeps corrosion to a minimum.
 
dennishodge

dennishodge

Registered
21 Feb 2018
93
14
47
Bellevue, WA, USA
Makes sense. It sure smells like brass!
Actually, that is NOT carbon. Refer to the extensive thread when we actually had the stuff analyzed in a lab, it is oxidized brass.

Greg
The sniff test agrees. Brought in some oxidized track and when handling it, woohoo, has that “metallic” smell. Which apparently is the copper (and to some degree, zinc) ions reacting with the fatty oil on our hands to create an organic molecule that our noses note as “metallic” (iron does this as well but aluminum does not). Carbon wouldn’t react.