Help with Modeltown Engine Shed

JimmyB

JimmyB

Semi-Retired; more time for trains.
I have a Modeltown engine shed, and thought it was time to start assembly. On removing the parts (as suspected) most of them are bowed, and the "Tips" suggest heating in a an oven at 50C for a few minutes until pliable, place on a flat surface and apply a heavy weight - easy!!

So the sides were treated to 50C for 5 minutes, then 10 minutes, and the temperature rising to 70C for 15 minutes, and though slightly pliable not enough to get them completely flat. So my questions are:
  1. Is method correct.
  2. Is the temperature correct.
  3. Is the time correct.
  4. What do YOU do.
  5. Or, am I expecting to much.
So any advise on getting these parts flat would be appreciated, also a supplementary question, I was going to use a two part adhesive to stick the parts together, what do YOU use. Many thanks for all the anticipated answers :) :)
 
P

Paul M

Registered
25 Oct 2016
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Royston
I thought the instructions say run hot water over the offending pieces.
I use Uni bond Repair Extreme, seems to last well (5 or 6 years outside, so far). It's also flexible to allow for expansion and contraction
 
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maxi-model

maxi-model

UK/US/ROW steam narrow gauge railways 1:1
27 Oct 2009
4,851
552
Bucks/Oxon/Northants area
Instructions from my moldings supplier, CMA Moldform, 20 years ago, when dealing with a distorted resin molding was to place in hot water on a flat surface (in a kitchen sink) so that the molding would return (no manual intervention) to its intended shape. We are assuming that on some part of the molding there is a flat reference plane. I would think that placing in an oven might be a bit aggressive and could risk damage to some resins.

I was told quick cure resins, like the now commonly used Polyurethane types, have a "memory" so if distorted after molding they will always return to the shape as molded with this method. No guideline temperatures were advised, I just used the the hot tap water as it came, though and would top up with some water from a freshly boiled kettle if necessary. Once the molding has settled back to its intended shape just add cold water gently to allow it to set.

I've pulled the same trick with some old built Pendlebury resin buildings that had been out a bit too much in direct sun, where the differential rates of expansion (bits in full sun bonded to those in shade) had caused distortion - I disassemble the buildings first. Hope this helps. Max

P.S. You could ask Modeltown for their their recommended method. They probably have had to rectify moldings at some point or another,. It's one of those things that can happen to the best suppliers.
 
David1226

David1226

Registered
24 Oct 2009
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Abingdon, Oxfordshire
You forgot to baste regularly and fill the rear door with sage and onion stuffing.

David
 
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Rhinochugger

Rhinochugger

Retired Oik
27 Oct 2009
28,502
3,437
North West Norfolk
As you will see from the attached Modeltown instructions it is clearly in an oven at 50C, I will ask Modeltown as suggested.
50 deg C is quite mild for an oven - but it's roughly the same as temperature that a boiler on E (as in economy / efficiency / green) mode will produce for your hot water.
 
JimmyB

JimmyB

Semi-Retired; more time for trains.
50 deg C is quite mild for an oven - but it's roughly the same as temperature that a boiler on E (as in economy / efficiency / green) mode will produce for your hot water.
As I said in the original post, I mover the temperature up to 70C as 50C is quite cool.
 
Rhinochugger

Rhinochugger

Retired Oik
27 Oct 2009
28,502
3,437
North West Norfolk
As I said in the original post, I mover the temperature up to 70C as 50C is quite cool.
Yep, I was just thinking aloud that either the oven method or the hot water are both working at similar temperatures.

Probably not a lot of help as neither 50 deg C nor 70 deg C have done the trick so far :rolleyes::rolleyes: