GWR colliery branch steamer

Rhinochugger

Rhinochugger

Retired Oik
27 Oct 2009
26,695
1,073
North West Norfolk
Broad Gauge, as developed by Brunel, was 7 feet and 1/4 inch. The original line from Paddington to Bristol was and still is, among the most level pieces of railroad track on Earth.
I wonder why the extra quarter of an inch :think::think::think::think::think:

I mean, I can live with four feet, eight and a half inches - whether it's Roman wagon wheels or horses' a***s it doesn't matter a jot, but if you're going to break the mould, and settle for seven feet instead of, say, six or eight, then why the extra quarter of an inch ? :nerd::nerd::nerd:
 
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Paul M

Registered
25 Oct 2016
4,169
562
56
Royston
I wonder why the extra quarter of an inch :think::think::think::think::think:

I mean, I can live with four feet, eight and a half inches - whether it's Roman wagon wheels or horses' a***s it doesn't matter a jot, but if you're going to break the mould, and settle for seven feet instead of, say, six or eight, then why the extra quarter of an inch ? :nerd::nerd::nerd:
Probably an extremely good reason that has been long forgotten. Wasn't it to do with farm carts? What is 7 foot and 1/4 in ells or rods and perches?
 
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Flying15

Registered
12 May 2015
67
82
London
You're bang on - I was being a little bit tongue in cheek, but you know me, I don't like to provoke ;);)
One of those small pannier tanks is probably the only think that could get me to buy a model of the GWR. I think the only reason that I have such GWR apathy is because in the early days of 00 there was a surfeit of GWR against a smattering of other regions.
I recall modelling magazines in the early 60’s being full of GWR layouts, but the only 00 ready to run was the Dublo Castle and the Triang Dean single
On the later I just had to have one and drooled over the catalogue until I could buy one when it came out
Nearly 60 years later I ve been creating one from Bachmanns Emily
Here’s a pic of it, not quite finished
I ll post some when I’ve finished properly painting and lining it!
BE5298E7-6EE7-4AA5-BCD5-C3D80395B52D.jpeg
 
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phils2um

Phil S
11 Sep 2015
496
276
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Thomas never looked the same - does that make me doubting?;)
 
tac foley

tac foley

Registered
11 Apr 2017
2,434
540
74
Near Huntingdon, UK
Pure speculation on my part - tolerances?
'zackly - from history - 'The gauge initially proposed by Brunel was 7 ft (2,134 mm) exactly but this was soon increased by 1⁄4 in (6 mm) to 7ft 1/4" (2,140 mm) to accommodate clearance problems identified during early testing. George Stephenson was to add an extra half inch to his original 4 ft 8 in (1,422 mm) gauge for the same reason.'
 
Rhinochugger

Rhinochugger

Retired Oik
27 Oct 2009
26,695
1,073
North West Norfolk
'zackly - from history - 'The gauge initially proposed by Brunel was 7 ft (2,134 mm) exactly but this was soon increased by 1⁄4 in (6 mm) to 7ft 1/4" (2,140 mm) to accommodate clearance problems identified during early testing. George Stephenson was to add an extra half inch to his original 4 ft 8 in (1,422 mm) gauge for the same reason.'
as per usual - mission creep :devil: :devil:
 
dennishodge

dennishodge

Registered
21 Feb 2018
94
15
48
Bellevue, WA, USA
I'd love to do Gauge 1 British. Part of me wishes that the industry had started becoming popular with Gauge 1 & 1m or something rather than Gauge IIm == "G scale" 1:22.5. Then we could run standard gauge and narrow gauge side by side and have those cool dual-gauge tracks with three rails (like Sunset Valley Railroad makes). As it is, going to standard Gauge II/ "III" is ginormous and pricey and would require the purchase of a larger garden with accompanying dwelling!