Good control for railway electrics

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Ken Tonge

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24 Jun 2013
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Darn... I thought I was doing well working with computers back in the days of green screens, basement sized main frames. 12" tape storage and clean rooms. But you've got me beat by a couple of decades... Hats off to you...
Me too! Remember the CREED for making punch tapes?
 
Rhinochugger

Rhinochugger

Retired Oik
27 Oct 2009
23,999
116
North West Norfolk
Although I started working with computers in the mid-1970s, we were using punched card machines for data input and output .
I remember having to write the input sheets for others to punch.

John Laing Construction were early into computers, and had a facility which they also provided (at a cost) for other contractors :nod::nod:

For those with a surveying background, I would describe the 'Angle Bible' if anyone's interested :yawn::yawn::yawn:
 
Hutch

Hutch

G Gauge, Raising Peaches, Apricots
1 Feb 2012
344
3
Southwest Oklahoma, USA
There were thousands of jokes and funny comments (that I cannot remember) about the old time computer stuff.
All are meaningless to the younger generation.
 
Neil Robinson

Neil Robinson

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24 Oct 2009
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Whilst at college, many years ago, I was among a group of students taught to program an even then antique valve powered analogue computer!
 
Rhinochugger

Rhinochugger

Retired Oik
27 Oct 2009
23,999
116
North West Norfolk
Whilst at college, many years ago, I was among a group of students taught to program an even then antique valve powered analogue computer!
Even in the eighties, I worked for a firm that had a 'computer room' o_Oo_O and it was only a provincial building company

Less than 10 years later, with a different firm, a computer salesman comes along trying to sell us some kit, including software which included a spreadsheet programme. All he could say about it was that it was 'very powerful', unfortunately he could not explain what it was meant to do :lipssealed::lipssealed::lipssealed:
 
Paul2727

Paul2727

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5 Jun 2018
136
6
England
All this reminiscing about old IT hardware had me digging in the loft for my old Toshiba T3200 'portable.’ Plugged her in, and to my surprise, up came the orange plasma screen. After a not insignificant time the mighty processing power of its Intel 12 MHz 286 CPU had MS DOS up and running.
Time to see what delights were hiding on its capacious 32Mb hard drive.

Way hey! World Tour Golf!

Well for the next few hours, it was the 80’s again. But even the jarring muzak of the game couldn’t totally drown out the incessant noise of incoming text messages from my mobile.

The poor old Toshiba had fought valiantly, but was no match for today’s technology. So with a heavy heart and an unsettling hankering for a bottle of Mad Dog 20/20 and a slice of Viennetta, she went back into her case.

I swear I caught a whiff of kouros aftershave and Moores menthol cigarettes as I shut the loft hatch.

Sleep tight old friend! I’ll see you in another thirty years..
 
PhilP

PhilP

G Scale, 7/8th's, Electronics
5 Jun 2013
22,280
112
Tamworth, Staffs.
I still (occasionally) use my Canon Laptop... The one with the built-in inkjet printer.
Really amuses today's Youf, when I turn up to have-at a bit of ancient Cisco gear with it.. Real serial ports, and a printout of changes before I leave site.

i then call-in on my flip-phone, whilst donning the shades, and large coat.. A-la 'Matrix'. :nerd::mask::cool::cool:
 
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3Valve

3Valve

Railways; Air cooled VW's; Soul Music
24 Oct 2009
15,374
8
Shropshire
www.shlr.org.uk
Although I started working with computers in the mid-1970s, we were using punched card machines for data input and output .
The spoil from punched card machines was a great source of OO scale bricks for scratch-building. We were still using punched card machines in the early eightees.
 
David1226

David1226

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24 Oct 2009
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Abingdon, Oxfordshire
The spoil from punched card machines was a great source of OO scale bricks for scratch-building. We were still using punched card machines in the early eightees.
There used to be a WPC on my shift who on more than one occasion would loosely tack stitch the sleeves on our Sergeant's tunic, when he left it hanging on the hook in his office, then filling the arms up with punchings from the telex machine. When he put his tunic on, especially if done in a hurry, it was like being in the middle of a blizzard. Happy days.

David
 
dunnyrail

dunnyrail

DOGS, Garden Railways, Steam Trains, Jive Dancing,
25 Oct 2009
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St.Neots Cambridgeshire UK
Working on the Railway TOPS was the thing that kept track of Locomotives and Wagons when I joined the Computer fun in 1978. We had Punch Cards intitially, then when we went to Cardless, all the Punch Machines were unceromously dumped outside of the Office (well Portacabin) to fare as best they could in the Weather ooop Norf. Never did find out what happened to all those lovely little on/off Micro Switches............
 
Hutch

Hutch

G Gauge, Raising Peaches, Apricots
1 Feb 2012
344
3
Southwest Oklahoma, USA
Working on the Railway TOPS was the thing that kept track of Locomotives and Wagons when I joined the Computer fun in 1978. We had Punch Cards intitially, then when we went to Cardless, all the Punch Machines were unceromously dumped outside of the Office (well Portacabin) to fare as best they could in the Weather ooop Norf. Never did find out what happened to all those lovely little on/off Micro Switches............
The disposal of many machines and dismissal of those who operated, repaired, and otherwise made a living from them was generally done in an abrupt and feelingless manner. Luckily, I worked the other end of the business.
 
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playmofire

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23 Oct 2010
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North Yorks
In 1975, our off-line card machines were ol IBM ones with a hammered paint finish. The younger engineers had no idea what they were or how to repair them. Eventually, we added a second hand more modern one where the punch head was behind a glass door; much quieter. But the noise was nothing compared with the card sorter!
 
dunnyrail

dunnyrail

DOGS, Garden Railways, Steam Trains, Jive Dancing,
25 Oct 2009
14,197
122
70
St.Neots Cambridgeshire UK
On Thursday I managed to pick up a copy of Model Railroader March Edition. In it there was a review of a WiFi Model Railroad LocoFi Locomotive Decoder. Works via a Smart Phone or perhaps eventually Tablet App. Apple iOS app should be available soon. Slated for 9-24v but clearly at the moment this is for the smaller stuff, but many of our smaller Locomotives would possibly suit this system. Can work from Track Power or they mention Dead Rail in their Webb Link.


At USD 140 probably not the cheepest kid on the block but if you have a Smart phone....... biggest issue I see with this as ever may be WiFi link in the Garden if it is a big one. Clearly some sort of WiFi Range extension may be required. May have said this before with another system or even this one.
 
idlemarvel

idlemarvel

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13 Jul 2015
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Ascot
FYI there has been a long discussion about LocoFi on the "Internet of Things" thread with contributions from the developers.
 
JimmyB

JimmyB

Learning; but slowly!
23 Feb 2018
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FYI there has been a long discussion about LocoFi on the "Internet of Things" thread with contributions from the developers.
And maybe more that just discussions ;)
 
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