G-gauge Signals

drzander

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28 Apr 2021
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Z-Stuff for Trains has been selling G-gauge signals for several years. We offer both track side signals and multi-track signal bridges. All signals have sensors built-in with complete control of the LED lights.
The signals can operate from 9V battery or accessory power. The signals can be see on our web site www.z-stuff.net. We are in the process of re-designing the signals but hope to have them back in production in the next few months. You can respond here with comments or directly to drzander@aol.com.
 

Retrac

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Anyone out there know what the green & amber screw terminals on LGB control box 51955 are used for?
 

curtis

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PhilP

G Scale, 7/8th's, Electronics
5 Jun 2013
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Anyone out there know what the green & amber screw terminals on LGB control box 51955 are used for?
Is that number a typo?
Did you mean 51755 by any chance?
 

-bbbb

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21 Dec 2017
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I'm not sure if there are differences, but on the 5075, I use the green and yellow terminals for diodes with opposite polarities going to the same wire:
IMG_8058.JPG
IMG_8059.JPG
It seems to control my switches well that way.
I have heard that the newer switch boxes may already have the diodes internally, while the older boxes like mine need the diodes added.
 

-bbbb

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bbbb,
in the first pic - what is that small greyish or greenish box connected to the cable? some kind of timer?
It's just a simple terminal block. It's effectively the same as a solder joint connecting the wire to the ends of the diodes.
 

Retrac

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Is that number a typo?
Did you mean 51755 by any chance?
Yes! Sorry I did mean 51755. Apparently the amber & green symbols relate to older connections as opposed to the current orange/white version. Is this correct & thank you for everyone who responded. I thought I could use these "spare" terminals to power the signal lights but evidently not.
 

korm kormsen

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24 Oct 2009
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... I thought I could use these "spare" terminals to power the signal lights but evidently not.
same as on the turnout-drives, you can hang the additional LGB double switches to your signal-drives to power your greens and reds.
(if i remember right, the number starts with12......)
 

phils2um

Phil S
11 Sep 2015
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If you are curious how the diodes should be configured to use the yellow (gelb), green (grün), and white (weiß) outputs to operate an EPL drive this was taken from LGB 0021, EPL Technique, 1983, page 10:

Three to two - 1.jpeg

It will work if the diodes are reversed but the motor throw will be opposite to what is normal for the control box switch positions. In all cases the white wire needs to connect directly to the control box. This is the same for the 51755.
 
Last edited:

-bbbb

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Yes! Sorry I did mean 51755. Apparently the amber & green symbols relate to older connections as opposed to the current orange/white version. Is this correct & thank you for everyone who responded. I thought I could use these "spare" terminals to power the signal lights but evidently not.
I'm under the impression that my track switches are a relatively newer kind (with only 2 connections) not designed to be used with my older switch box, and the way I was able to make the older momentary switch box(with 3 connections) work with the 2 connector track switches is by putting diodes on 2 of the 3 connectors (opposite polarities) and tying them together in one wire as seen in post #5 above: G-gauge Signals Then there are only 2 wires going to the track switch. So presumably you should be able to do the same thing to convert the amber/green/white to the orange/white, by tying amber and green together via diodes and calling it orange.

Edit: Yes... what Phil S said.