Does this seem like too much grease?

FurkaSOCal

FurkaSOCal

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I was taking a look inside the gearbox of one of my used locomotives and noticed what seems like a lot of grease. What do you think? Is it a little much? Should I clean everything out and re grease? Seems like a lot of it has just been flung to one side and isn't even in the gears.
 

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GAP

GAP

G Scale trains, Lawn Bowls.
14 Jun 2011
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Bomaderry, New South Wales, Australia
I was taking a look inside the gearbox of one of my used locomotives and noticed what seems like a lot of grease. What do you think? Is it a little much? Should I clean everything out and re grease? Seems like a lot of it has just been flung to one side and isn't even in the gears.
I just opened up a Stainz gearbox and found similar, I just cleaned out all the old grease and re-greased to the gears. Can't hurt to change the grease if the opportunity arises.
 
G-force1

G-force1

Prevarication Rules!
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I'm no expert on 'lectric locos, but that doesn't seem to me to be too much. The spur gears look to be lacking. You could redistribute it, though it will always tend to collect in one spot due to the action of the gears in an enclosed space. No doubt an expert will be along shortly.

The box should not be packed too tightly as the grease will soften and expand with heat when running and could pressurise and force its way out.
 
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ntpntpntp

ntpntpntp

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Not necessarily too much, but it's in the wrong place. Either scoop it and re-apply to the gears, or remove it all and apply a new blob to the gears if you think it warrants replacement. Run the mechanism dead slow at first to distribute the grease rather than flinging it off again.
 
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FurkaSOCal

FurkaSOCal

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thanks!
 
P

Paradise

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It's not too much. You just don't want to pack the entire case with it which can cause unnecessary friction and overheating. Yeah just poke it back to where it is needed.
If you replace it you should use a plastic safe type of grease, not the regular car stuff.
 
PhilP

PhilP

G Scale, 7/8th's, Electronics
5 Jun 2013
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I would clean the older stuff out, and especially remove it from the motor casing...
As it degrades, the 'oil' (liquid component) separates, and this can migrate into the motor, contaminating the brushes.
Personally, I feel, less is more..
 
GAP

GAP

G Scale trains, Lawn Bowls.
14 Jun 2011
2,430
7
64
Bomaderry, New South Wales, Australia
I would clean the older stuff out, and especially remove it from the motor casing...
As it degrades, the 'oil' (liquid component) separates, and this can migrate into the motor, contaminating the brushes.
Personally, I feel, less is more..
Just replaced a motor in a Stainz for exactly that problem it would not start and if it did it was sluggish and jerky, any suggestions on how and what to use to clean the motor out so it runs smoothly again?
 
PhilP

PhilP

G Scale, 7/8th's, Electronics
5 Jun 2013
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Tamworth, Staffs.
Just replaced a motor in a Stainz for exactly that problem it would not start and if it did it was sluggish and jerky, any suggestions on how and what to use to clean the motor out so it runs smoothly again?
Depends a little on the vintage of the motor.. - Some are more open at that end of the motor, and you can flush the motor out with a 'dry' contact cleaner..
By 'dry', I mean one that does not leave a residue behind.

Best way is to take the motor apart, BUT.. This may kill, rather then cure, on the odd occasion.
I have found a thick 'paste' of carbon/oil/grease/general-muck in the gaps of the commutator. you can remove this with a blunted cocktail stick. Then a CAREFUL polish with a lint-free cloth, bit of isopropal (or meths). - Don't use cotton buds, they leave 'fluff' and are not environmentally correct these days! :rolleyes:

There is (at least) one thread on here, about disassembly of Buhler motors.. I think Neil is the expert on this? :think:
 
Rhinochugger

Rhinochugger

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27 Oct 2009
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It's not necessarily a question of too much, but whether it's the right sort - there are at least a couple of grease types that are good for model gearboxes, the white grease and a black molyslip grease, but you need to make sure that they are intended for model use :nod::nod::nod::nod:.

The Hob-e-lube set is best ;);)
 
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Neil Robinson

Neil Robinson

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Bill Barnwell

Bill Barnwell

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I agree with ntpntpntp
 
GAP

GAP

G Scale trains, Lawn Bowls.
14 Jun 2011
2,430
7
64
Bomaderry, New South Wales, Australia
Depends a little on the vintage of the motor.. - Some are more open at that end of the motor, and you can flush the motor out with a 'dry' contact cleaner..
By 'dry', I mean one that does not leave a residue behind.

Best way is to take the motor apart, BUT.. This may kill, rather then cure, on the odd occasion.
I have found a thick 'paste' of carbon/oil/grease/general-muck in the gaps of the commutator. you can remove this with a blunted cocktail stick. Then a CAREFUL polish with a lint-free cloth, bit of isopropal (or meths). - Don't use cotton buds, they leave 'fluff' and are not environmentally correct these days! :rolleyes:

There is (at least) one thread on here, about disassembly of Buhler motors.. I think Neil is the expert on this? :think:
Thanks, the motor is a Buhler with one end open, I can see the brushes held in with what looks like a spring clip.
This one is from a 20212, the replacement looks like a sealed unit with no brushes visible.
I'll try a flush with contact cleaner first up then if I get brave will try to take out the brushes and have a look at them and the commutator.
 
Neil Robinson

Neil Robinson

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Thanks, the motor is a Buhler with one end open, .................... if I get brave will try to take out the brushes and have a look at them and the commutator.
Be brave.
In my opinion mechanically cleaning the commutator slots together with checking brush wear and freedom of brush movement is very important.