Cleminson 6 wheelers

Ken Tonge

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24 Jun 2013
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I have found curve to be the worse area for derailment, especially if the wagon does not have compensation. If hand push the wagon around the curve, check to see if all 4 wheels remain in contact with the rail, a bit of hand "wobbling" as you push it around, you may find a spot where the flange just clears the top of the rail, and this is you issue. The wheel base, axle compensation, flange size and position in the rake will all help determine if a wagon derails.
Here's my first experimental vehicle. It is good on good, level track - goes round all the bends no problem (and that includes a couple of bits of 1175mm radius). But it does not have enough compensation to cope with wobbly bits of track. My solution will be to relay the wobbly bits of track on proper foundations where at present it's just on hard=packed earth and subject to weed invasion, and weathering. It's a job I should have done years ago.
The brass rods which join the outer ponies to the swivel joints, and the ones which pass right through all three trucks are Sifbronze brazing rods. These have just the right degree of springiness to allow the trucks to align themselves radially with the curves without putting too much side force on the flanges.
Thanks for all your suggestions.
 

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Rhinochugger

Retired Oik
27 Oct 2009
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Mmmm - thinking out loud.

If the floor of the vehicle could go higher then
  • one end axle could have vertical compensation
  • the other end axle would need to be packed out, but without vertical movement
  • the inner axle could float, maybe with some weight added
Just thinking
 
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Ken Tonge

Registered
24 Jun 2013
37
3
Country flag
Mmmm - thinking out loud.

If the floor of the vehicle could go higher then
  • one end axle could have vertical compensation
  • the other end axle would need to be packed out, but without vertical movement
  • the inner axle could float, maybe with some weight added
Just thinking
Yes - I thought all that kind of thing. But, it adds complications to what is basically a simple construction. The thing works perfectly on half decent track. Fixing the track seems like the sensible option. I never minded the bits of wobbly track as it added a bit of realism to quarry trains and the Denver Rio Grande. but it will be nice to eliminate derailments which mar the pleasure of my Victorian passenger experience.
 

Rhinochugger

Retired Oik
27 Oct 2009
30,948
3,706
North West Norfolk
Country flag
Yes - I thought all that kind of thing. But, it adds complications to what is basically a simple construction. The thing works perfectly on half decent track. Fixing the track seems like the sensible option. I never minded the bits of wobbly track as it added a bit of realism to quarry trains and the Denver Rio Grande. but it will be nice to eliminate derailments which mar the pleasure of my Victorian passenger experience.
Yes, I am a devout bodger, and have some expertly laid dodgy track - it's a speciality of mine >:)
 
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Ken Tonge

Registered
24 Jun 2013
37
3
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Here is the first completed chassis. It is built on a sheet of tinplate. The pivots for the pony trucks are chicago book-binding screws. The trucks are brass angle and phosphor bronze strip with Accucraft W&L axle boxes and Z6 wheels. The single length of Sifbronze is sufficient to keep the centre truck at right angles to the track. It runs beautifully. The chassis weighs 495 g. The carriage body is 375 g. Photo shows comparison of the new Cleminson coach alongside a 4-wheeler similar to what the conversion was like previously. DSCN2248.JPG