Camber and level changes

PhilP

PhilP

G Scale, 7/8th's, Electronics
5 Jun 2013
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Tamworth, Staffs.
Great re-purposing..

Now.......... Is there an 'App' to use the torch LED, as a laser-level? :wondering::think:

:rofl::rofl::rofl:
 
dunnyrail

dunnyrail

DOGS, Garden Railways, Steam Trains, Jive Dancing,
25 Oct 2009
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St.Neots Cambridgeshire UK
I've found a level checking solution inspired by Dunnyrail but using an old smartphone with a level checking app - mainly because it saved me a 20 mile drive to the nearest hardware shop and it actually found a use for the vile orange LGB hopper and an old phone. Note the pine packing pieces and cunningly crafted wedges. There are a few level apps available, I've tried three so far and they are all remarkably accurate - this of course depends on how good the phone sensors are (this is a venerable Sony).

I've run it around the worst affected area and discovered some nasty lateral variations which I have repacked and levelled. They didn't look that bad to the Mk1 eyeball but one of which, over the course of half a metre had a 5 degree change left to right on a rising gradient. Then the sun came out and I couldn't read the screen so that's it until the clouds return. Obviously a bit of a design flaw. Perhaps a cocktail umbrella? Only another 200ft to check...

Thank you everyone for the help, suggestions and pointing me in the right direction.
Wow there is always an app these days. I do have the woodwork app that does each of the checks on their own, but this is a revaluation! Must must have the app.
 
Hutch

Hutch

G Gauge, Raising Peaches, Apricots
1 Feb 2012
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Southwest Oklahoma, USA
Wow there is always an app these days. I do have the woodwork app that does each of the checks on their own, but this is a revaluation! Must must have the app.
My Grandfather used a half empty scotch bottle to check for level. Worked for him!

---Hutch
 
Lodgie_

Lodgie_

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29 Jan 2020
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Yaiza
Great re-purposing..

Now.......... Is there an 'App' to use the torch LED, as a laser-level? :wondering::think:

:rofl::rofl::rofl:
Strange you should mention this but I did see an app that used laser for levelling, probably wont be able to find it but I will have a look
 
Gavin Sowry

Gavin Sowry

Garden Railroader and Raconteur
27 Oct 2009
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Hutt Valley, NZ
Of course, Aristocraft make/made a standards gauge that had the two bubbles.... as well as nicks and crannies for checking gauge, points spread, flangeways, and back to backs.
Best investment I ever made. I also have a small spirit level, set in hardwood, that I use when physically tamping track.
 
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Paul M

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25 Oct 2016
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Have shown this before but it is a very usable device, with a coupling a loco could trundle it round slowly - no getting down on your knees. Axle guards and wheels are by tenmille, but others may work or even on an LGB Flat Wagon.
View attachment 267134 View attachment 267135
That's exactly what I meant Jon. I wouldn't dare use one on my line, it'd be too worrying
 
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Paradise

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28 Jan 2010
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Can your bogie axles go up and down (twist) independently? On a real bogie each axle box is sprung independently so a single wheel won't lift off the rail but many models don't do that instead one side frame can twist from the bolster spreader like on LGB bogies. Think of a 4 legged table on an uneven floor. Undulating track and stiff bogies can cause derailments.
 
dunnyrail

dunnyrail

DOGS, Garden Railways, Steam Trains, Jive Dancing,
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When I built my last Railcar I made the made one bogie so that it could twist forward and aft, the other port and starboard. This tends to account for many ills and I think that LGB Bogies and the 4 wheel vehicle ones may allow for this as well otherwise they would all flop to one side.
 
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Paradise

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28 Jan 2010
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When I built my last Railcar I made the made one bogie so that it could twist forward and aft, the other port and starboard. This tends to account for many ills and I think that LGB Bogies and the 4 wheel vehicle ones may allow for this as well otherwise they would all flop to one side.
Yeah, Some LGB ones are made on one side so when the screw that holds the side frame is done up tight, it will still twist because of a rounded seat there. Some AristoCraft ones are sprung where the spreader joins the side frames. I've seen some that have been glued so they don't twist. Sloppy axle holes and slightly loose side frames will let the axles move so all wheels remain on the rail. Just something to look out for because some bogies can be problematic on undulating track and some others will do it just fine.

Forward and aft, port and starboard. Sloppy as she goes captain. Arrgh! :D
 
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Paul M

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Wow there is always an app these days. I do have the woodwork app that does each of the checks on their own, but this is a revaluation! Must must have the app.
Woodwork app? I could havedone with one of those last week, it could have cut that bit of wood square for me:rofl::rofl:
 
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Puychaud

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25 Dec 2019
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Liverpool
Hi, I hope you don’t mind my joining in this discussion – I am new to G scale, only started my first railway this January, and I suspect I have reinvented the wheel several times, but maybe my experiences will be of use to someone.

My railway started in a raised flower bed that was once a pond (filled in because my grand-daughter showed an alarming climbing skill at an early age), and as these things go I decided I needed a bigger area and broke out onto the rockery using a raised bed supported on 4”x4” pillars, with the road bed for the track being decking boards. No matter how much care I took I found it impossible to get the decking boards level in all directions, but I thought a few mm either way was OK….until I sent around the Bachmann Big Hauler, which derailed every few feet, particularly going over points. I then spent several weeks carefully leveling the track using screws spacers and wedges. Great fun really, until of course the weather got hotter, track expanded and buckled because the screws did not allow for movement. So back to the drawing board – during this time the track in the flower bed (on a bed of fine gravel – horticultural grit) worked fine through all weathers. So I decided to do away with the screws spacers and wedges and put the track onto a plastic bed (made from 10cm x 10cm electrical ducting) on top of the decking boards , then gravel on top of that – it is early days but so far no derailments and a much smoother ride. It would seem that the old ways are the best.


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Paul M

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Welcome Puychaud, looks like a fine set up have there. Don't worry about possibly repeating advice we're all interested in anything someone has to say
 
PhilP

PhilP

G Scale, 7/8th's, Electronics
5 Jun 2013
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Tamworth, Staffs.
Welcome to the Forum!

Look's like your railway is 'softening' with the planting? - Long-ago, I also had a Daughter who was a 'climber!'.. First discovered when 'something' tugged at my trouser bottom's, when up the ladder.. Hannah, pink, fluffy romper-suit, and dummy in her mouth! :eek: - At that time, she could climb-up, but not back down :rolleyes: which made getting down the ladder 'interesting'!
 
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Puychaud

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25 Dec 2019
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Liverpool
Welcome to the Forum!

Look's like your railway is 'softening' with the planting? - Long-ago, I also had a Daughter who was a 'climber!'.. First discovered when 'something' tugged at my trouser bottom's, when up the ladder.. Hannah, pink, fluffy romper-suit, and dummy in her mouth! :eek: - At that time, she could climb-up, but not back down :rolleyes: which made getting down the ladder 'interesting'!
If only we could train them to clean tracks, lay down ballast (and make a cup of tea) - unfortunately when they get to the age when they are capable they just don't want to know :)
 
PhilP

PhilP

G Scale, 7/8th's, Electronics
5 Jun 2013
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Tamworth, Staffs.
If only we could train them to clean tracks, lay down ballast (and make a cup of tea) - unfortunately when they get to the age when they are capable they just don't want to know :)
Not so sure with Hannah..

At five, SW had to make a 'City of Truro' birthday cake, and she declared she wanted to drive it when she grew-up! :):inlove:
 
A

adverse camber

Registered
2 Dec 2009
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2
East Anglia
its not the adverse camber that cases the problems (though you are better off without it if it can be avoided), it is any sudden change in gradient or slope on the track. Discovered this when I suddenly developed a derailing problem on a previously OK bit of track. A spirit level on wheels showed there to be a very sudden change in the track and when I took it up it was clear someone had trodden on it hard and it had a dip. Not noticeable by eye till I had the rail lying on a flat surface out of the sleepers. A gentle gradual adverse camber is fine, I have several and they don't cause problems as long as they are only a degree or two.

AC
 
Greg Elmassian

Greg Elmassian

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8 Mar 2014
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Funny, by definition adverse camber is harmful, unfavorable.... some day please tell the story.

In terms of track "warp" as we call it in the states, the equalization of our locos and rolling stock does not match the capabilities of the real thing, so our models are more sensitive, and as AC has pointed out, ANY sudden change in warp, grade, etc. is adverse.

Regards, Greg
 
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Paul M

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"warp" as we call it in the states, the equalization of our locos and rolling stock does not match the capabilities of the real thing,
The engines canna take it Jim
 
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Paul M

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warp" as we call it in the states, the equalization of our locos and rolling stock does not match the capabilities of the real thing,
images _1_.jpeg

Scottyou to the rescue