Building manual point/switch throw and.......

ge_rik

ge_rik

British narrow gauge (esp. Southwold and W&LLR)
24 Oct 2009
9,791
400
Cheshire
www.riksrailway.blogspot.com
I've got a few Heyn point levers. They're more or less self cleaning - just need the grot hiking out once in a while. The balance weight does help to keep the blades in place, but they can be trailed through against the throw (if you know what I mean) - eg see 2:00 min into this video -


Rik
 
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Martino

Martino

Kit bashing, The UK narrow gauge, The GWR, Aviatio
I've got a few Heyn point levers. They're more or less self cleaning - just need the grot hiking out once in a while. The balance weight does help to keep the blades in place, but they can be trailed through against the throw (if you know what I mean) - eg see 2:00 min into this video -


Rik
Thanks Rik, I see what you mean. I’m still playing around. I’ll have some Bowden Cable later this week, so will see where that takes me. It’s become a bit of a ‘project’ and a challenge ;-)
 
Rhinochugger

Rhinochugger

Retired Oik
27 Oct 2009
27,113
1,321
North West Norfolk
Thanks everyone.

The idea of putting a spring in is ideal, particularly using a zig zag rather than an omega loop. I’ll try that. So far, using the picture hook has provided the flexibility, as the pin sliding through the hook has been a stand in for the spring - giving a self setting adjustment for the distance if you see what I mean.

The article on Bowden cables is very valuable Rik. Thank you for that. I’m about to go off to a local bike store to look at their cables. That may be the answer I’m looking for. Combining that with a barrel bolt at one end and a zig zag spring or omega loop at the other may do the trick.

I wasn’t aware of the Bachmann switch throws Sean. Certainly deserves looking at.

I’m still attracted by the Heyn throws, but like all the others, my thought is that they will require constant maintenance to keep out sand and grit. It’s enough of a pain getting the stuff out of the switch/point blades!

Anyway, once again, thank you all for the suggestions and advice. I’ll report back after the bike shop visit and further experimentation.
I have a point lever a.k.a switch throw, which I think was made by San Val using a lever that came from Tenmille in the UK. In other words, Tenmille made the lever, it was shipped out to San Val to be mounted onto two sleeper extensiont (rather like the Bachamnn one) then shipped back to the UK as it fitted the USAT #6 turnouts.

I don't know if San Val still produce them, but Tenmille still make the basic lever, which has some adjustment in the mechanism :nod: :nod:

 
Martino

Martino

Kit bashing, The UK narrow gauge, The GWR, Aviatio
I have a point lever a.k.a switch throw, which I think was made by San Val using a lever that came from Tenmille in the UK. In other words, Tenmille made the lever, it was shipped out to San Val to be mounted onto two sleeper extensiont (rather like the Bachamnn one) then shipped back to the UK as it fitted the USAT #6 turnouts.

I don't know if San Val still produce them, but Tenmille still make the basic lever, which has some adjustment in the mechanism :nod: :nod:

Now, why didn’t I think of Tenmille? That’s a good lead Rhino, thank you. San Val closed some time ago, of course. However, the Tenmille stuff could be very useful.
 
Madman

Madman

Registered
25 Oct 2009
13,539
482
Pennsylvania, USA
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PhilP

PhilP

G Scale, 7/8th's, Electronics
5 Jun 2013
25,537
1,321
Tamworth, Staffs.
Now, why didn’t I think of Tenmille? That’s a good lead Rhino, thank you. San Val closed some time ago, of course. However, the Tenmille stuff could be very useful.
Tenmille do G1 point-rodding as well.. :eek:;):devil::devil:
 
F

Fred Mills

Registered
27 Mar 2017
2,015
305
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Ottawa/Nepean, Ontario Canada
Have any of you guys ever heard of "Choke Cables" ? Here in Ottawa, most Canadian Tire, Auto centres stock them. They are less expensive than any of the bicycle brake cables, and are available in longer lengths. The choke cables usually have a stainless steel "Wire" in the outer sheath, so it does not rust.
It does help to add a drop of oil to the cable now and then.
I usually use a "Flat angle bracket" at the switch (Point) end of the cable, without the need of any spring. I drill a 1/16th" hole at each extreme end of the bracket, to insert a connecting link to the switch, and the cable. I drill an appropriate hole for a fulcrum screw in the middle corner, and mount it using a wood screw, and an appropriate number of washers, to the wooden roadbed. I use 2x6-8" wooden roadbed for our railway. The points (Switch) is secured to the roadbed also.
There are pictures on the OVGRS web page of our various attempts, at "Inventing" LOW COST, switch controls. WE claim to have invented the original "Patented !! Barrel Bolt switch throw" way back in the 80's...in case anyone is interested.
See them at: www.ovgrs.org/. The "Track" thread.
The latest method I've been using, is the least expensive, easiest made from CHEAP existing materials, found at your local hardware supplier: the simple, flat angle bracket switch lever.
As far as making springs; all you need is a length of "Piano Wire" (Spring wire), usually available at hobby, and craft stores...even hardware stores on occasion, and a good quality pair of small nosed pliers, along with a pair of side cutter, wire cutters.
It's rather a no-brainer, once a person has an idea of what bends they want to put in that piece of wire !!
The main problem, is usually left in the hands of those that insist in free-floating their switches (Points), and track...how to mount the throws, to their switches.o_O
I hope this helps, or motivates others to make improvements to my, hopefully, helpful suggestions.
Fred Mills
 
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F

Fred Mills

Registered
27 Mar 2017
2,015
305
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Ottawa/Nepean, Ontario Canada
The other method of switch/point control, is the one using a simple spring, and two holes in the switch. One hole in the centre of the throw bar, and the other in the centre of the parallel tie (Sleeper)...I think this was used by "Pico" in their HO/OO line of track and switches. I have lately drilled the holes, using a light hand, and a pin vice. One switch is being used as a test, to see how it stands up to out-door living. Not much good for remote controlling, but fine if you are able to easily access the point/switch, even from a standing position, using a gentle nudge from your cane !!
Fred mills
 
P

perpetualnewbie

Registered
30 Apr 2019
70
31
37
United Kingdom
Fred - you think right, that sounds like a good description of what Peco and Hornby HO/OO points generally do. Two holes, one fine wire spring with one loop in it, pushes to whichever side is closest. It's very reliant on the plastic plate over the top that holds it all in. The Peco ones are robust but the Hornbies disintegrate if you give them a funny look. I don't see any reason why the principle shouldn't scale up to G ok, though.
 
Martino

Martino

Kit bashing, The UK narrow gauge, The GWR, Aviatio
Thank you Fred, incredibly useful.
I’ve got hold of some bike brake cable and set up a prototype in my workshop. It works very well. Just waiting to get hold of some brackets and clips to try an outside version.
Your OVGRS piece is very instructive. Thanks again.
 
Martino

Martino

Kit bashing, The UK narrow gauge, The GWR, Aviatio
The working prototype now in operation. The initial installation to a single point/switch was immediately successful so I moved on and linked a second point/switch in the crossover, not thinking for a moment that it would work. It did!

There are no springs involved, although I may experiment with some in the future. It’s just a barrel bolt, a set of brake cables, three brass picture hooks and some nylon cable clamps.

Currently not very photogenic and a bit rough to be honest, but I’m pleased for a first attempt. I’ll camouflage everything of course, but maintain the ability to remove for maintenance.

So far, it all works with trains going through, but I’ll do some more intense testing this weekend.


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ge_rik

ge_rik

British narrow gauge (esp. Southwold and W&LLR)
24 Oct 2009
9,791
400
Cheshire
www.riksrailway.blogspot.com
Looks neatly done to me. Should be quite easy to hide the cable with ballast. Lots of food for thought here, thanks.

Rik
 
PhilP

PhilP

G Scale, 7/8th's, Electronics
5 Jun 2013
25,537
1,321
Tamworth, Staffs.
Probably not cost-effective for the US, but at the price, for here in the UK..

 
A

Achim.Z.

Registered
6 Apr 2017
27
23
47
AT
Hello;

and today - would you do it the same way? after one year of use?

regards from gSi-Berg
Achim
 
Martino

Martino

Kit bashing, The UK narrow gauge, The GWR, Aviatio
Hello;

and today - would you do it the same way? after one year of use?

regards from gSi-Berg
Achim
Yes, I would. All the throws are still working well. The actual points/turnouts need the usual brushing out of dust and bits before each session but the actual linkages work fine. In fact I have some more to do in the coming months and will use pretty much the same process.
 
A

Achim.Z.

Registered
6 Apr 2017
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AT
cool! thanks for feedback

regards from gSi-Berg
Achim
 
Greg Elmassian

Greg Elmassian

Registered
8 Mar 2014
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487
San Diego
www.elmassian.com
A question, Fred suggested "choke cable" because the center is solid and it will push as well as pull.

It looks like you used bicycle derailleur cable, which is a braided, twisted center, which pulls fine (although stretches a bit under high loads), but does not push as well.

Without a spring return at the switch, I would think that the "push" direction might not be as "positive" as the "pull" direction.

Just curious, I understand you already stated it works well.

Greg
 
F

Fred Mills

Registered
27 Mar 2017
2,015
305
77
Ottawa/Nepean, Ontario Canada
Automotive "Choke Cables" are also usually available in greater lengths, and are usually MUCH less expensive.
I use them wherever I have a remote switch/points, or to prevent having to bend over. No springs are required, in most cases.
In some cases I just drive a simple iron "T BAR" fence post into the ground, near to the switch I want to control. I then cut it to the height I require, with a simple hack-saw. I then mount an appropriate metal bracket; drilling holes for nuts and bolts. You could use a slender, but strong wooden post, instead of the metal fence post.
BTW>>>>>>> note that the OVGRS web page address has been changed to: www.ovgrs.ca <<<<<<<<<<<<
This is where pictures of choke cable applications can be found.
….along with other INEXPENSIVE point controls.