Accucraft Fn3 caboose - colour change....

tac foley

tac foley

Registered
11 Apr 2017
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Near Huntingdon, UK
A few years ago, I bought this great-looking Accucraft brass caboose from Sandy up there in Stirling at a very good price, mainly, I think, because somebody had carefully removed all the D&RGW decalling and replaced it with, uh, nothing, except a fictitious so-called 'estate'.

Looking for yet another project after my venture into Gauge 1 scratch-building with my CPR reefer car, I discovered a complete set of Stan Cedarleaf's superb D&RGW decals, and decided to lay 'em on it. All went well, until I ran out of the usual Humbrol satin finish varnish I used on most everything. Yup, I used another brand, and it was a total disaster, lifting all the previously-applied varnish in a kind of frost.

It has taken me overt two weeks to remove that - something I NEVER want to do again - but this evening, after my usual two-way pontification shout with old friend Fred over there in The Big O, basking in the 32C of a nice afternoon, I thought I'd show you what can be done to put things right - if you have a mind to do it.

How did I take off all the old finish and leave only a flat colour? Well, I used rubbing alcohol, white spirits, nail-polish remover, airbrush cleaner, TETRA bore cleaner and many, many little pieces of pan scrubber, Miracle cloth and various shapes of scalpel blade....

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Please excuse the fingerprints - my own fault, having just finished off a bowl of potato chips. I'll do better next time for you, and give it a good wipe-over before taking the all-revealing pics.

As ever, my thanks to Stan Cedarleaf over there in Prescott Canyon for his great decals, and to pal Fred for the encouragement. :)
A new one now, IF you could find one, that is, is about £400 or so, and although it IS made virtually entirely of brass and nickel-silver and weighs a ton, is still only a ghost of the remarkable Bachmann van of the same kind, and maybe even the same road number. I bought two of those a couple of years back when they were remaindered at £75 each.....shoulda bought ten.
 
Riograndad

Riograndad

Model Railroading, boats and oil painting,
6 Jul 2013
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Northampton UK
I have one of these and yes a heavy beast,I wanted the Bachmann item but alas none about so settled for this one,must say it rides extremely well.mine kept derailing at certain spots on the railroad until I found the truck adjustment was wrong as the car was running to tight on the chassis,losened the screw setting on the springs and now runs like a dream:clap:.GRS had one and may still be there in the second hand section,£200,its where mine came from.
 
tac foley

tac foley

Registered
11 Apr 2017
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Near Huntingdon, UK
I'm sure I've posted this before, maybe not, but this here is a free-lance take on a cross between a drover's van and a combine...

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tac foley

tac foley

Registered
11 Apr 2017
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Near Huntingdon, UK
Interior shot before putting the roof on.............

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Riograndad

Riograndad

Model Railroading, boats and oil painting,
6 Jul 2013
1,815
489
65
Northampton UK
Great car love it!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!:envy::envy::envy:
 
tac foley

tac foley

Registered
11 Apr 2017
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Near Huntingdon, UK
It came from Phil Dipple, he of Phil's narrow gauge fame, as a limited production a few years back. Phil's marvellous kits are based on the pioneer method of the late Mr Sheridan - I have another of his models here - the shorty van. The great thing about building cars using real wood is that they look like they are made of real wood. Even with the best will in the world, plastic still looks like plastic.

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About five years ago, while visiting with another group over in Narfk, one helper dropped this van onto a paving slab, and made a good job of it too. It took me a while to get it all back together, but I doubt you can see the many joins and splices I had to make to restore it to its former glory. These images were taken afterwards.