1/24 - 1/25 Is there a real difference ??

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ped

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13 Dec 2009
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Finding it hard to find 1/24 scale cars and trucks 40s- 60s era, however there does seem to be a few in 1/25 scale, My question is, would there be a noteable difference in size between the 2 scales, Any thoughts greatly appreciated, Thanks
 
Rhinochugger

Rhinochugger

Retired Oik
27 Oct 2009
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1 in 25 - about 4%. As Jon says :nod: :nod: :nod:

How good are your eyes?

The only time you'd see the difference would be to put a 1:24 model alongside an identical 1:25 model.
 
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Paul M

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Really depends how keen you are, if you keep them separate, I don't suppose many people would notice
 
maxi-model

maxi-model

UK/US/ROW steam narrow gauge railways 1:1
27 Oct 2009
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Here is something I have never really understood - Why is there the common use, to this day, of both 1:24 and 1:25 in the US market for similar sector model products, e.g. cars and vehicles. I can understand differing subject areas having developed with differing scaling conventions and how that can transmute across different hobby sectors to attract business. But such small differences within the same sector ? Apart from locking the buyer into your scale and creating "brand loyalty" I cannot see the point. Max
 
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Paradise

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I go by the 10% rule. If I am any fussier than that, I may have to wait another century before they make what I like in the perfect scale. :D
Let's face it. Unless you are running 1:32 or 1/20.3 or 1/24 cape gauge models, not much else in this hobby is in scale or correct gauge or proportion.
One trick I go by is to use smaller prototype cars that are a little over scale or vice versa. Unless models are sitting next to each other, even the uninformed rivet counter will notice the difference in 4%. :shake:
 
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Paradise

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Here is something I have never really understood - Why is there the common use, to this day, of both 1:24 and 1:25 in the US market for similar sector model products, e.g. cars and vehicles. I can understand differing subject areas having developed with differing scaling conventions and how that can transmute across different hobby sectors to attract business. But such small differences within the same sector ? Apart from locking the buyer into your scale and creating "brand loyalty" I cannot see the point. Max
Not totally sure of all the details but this is my take on it. :nerd:
1/24 is a traditional engineering scale among others based on fractions. Engineers used to make running models for evaluation in 1:6, 1:12 etc. way back since the industrial revolution and packaging eggs.
1:25 is from fractions too but from a different perspective, perhaps a metricized one being 4 times the size of 1:100. Nearly the same but not quite.
What I find really dumb is 1:18 cars but trucks and tractors are 1:16 as if the two will never meet. I think that is because a farm tractor is smaller than a car so it gives more WOW factor sitting on the store shelf but drives collectors who would like to mix models together nuts. :banghead: The manufacturers don't always see the big picture as we do. I have a Revell Sopwith Camel model right here next to me in 1:28. So where am I meant to park that?
 
Northsider

Northsider

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I model in 15mm/ft (1:20.3) but as most figures are 16mm/ft (1:19), I use those. They are bit on the small side, but (to me) acceptably so.
 
dutchelm

dutchelm

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The scale of many vehicles depends on the size of the box it is going to be sold in. A good example were the matchbox series of vehicles.
 
P

ped

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13 Dec 2009
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Anglesey,North Wales
Thanks for all the input guys, Looks like im gonna go for a mix of 1/24 & 1/25
As Lazy Grange Bay Mike says, It's my railway I'll have what i like
 
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Rhinochugger

Rhinochugger

Retired Oik
27 Oct 2009
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North West Norfolk
Here is something I have never really understood - Why is there the common use, to this day, of both 1:24 and 1:25 in the US market for similar sector model products, e.g. cars and vehicles. I can understand differing subject areas having developed with differing scaling conventions and how that can transmute across different hobby sectors to attract business. But such small differences within the same sector ? Apart from locking the buyer into your scale and creating "brand loyalty" I cannot see the point. Max
In the UK there are a couple of diecast car manufacturers who use(d) 1:25 - I s'pose for some people it's easier to work out, especially if there is no absolute reason to use anything else.
 
Gizzy

Gizzy

Railways, Aviation, Caravanning....
26 Oct 2009
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I run mainly LGB which is 1:22.5, but my road vehicles are 1:24.

You wouldn't really notice the difference....
 
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Paul M

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Definitely a Rule 8 situation
 
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Paradise

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I model in 15mm/ft (1:20.3) but as most figures are 16mm/ft (1:19), I use those. They are bit on the small side, but (to me) acceptably so.
The can't be too bad because they should actually be on the little too big side. The smaller the denominator the bigger the model. :nerd:
 
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Paradise

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The scale of many vehicles depends on the size of the box it is going to be sold in. A good example were the matchbox series of vehicles.
Which came first. The model or the box? :think: