Soleirolia solerolii 'Mind Your Own Business' after a dry spell.

ge_rik

British narrow gauge (esp. Southwold and W&LLR)
24 Oct 2009
10,411
1,178
Cheshire
www.riksrailway.blogspot.com
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I must admit to being a fan of MYOB - great ground cover. My garden is North facing and so often in the shade of the house from direct sunlight but, at this time of year, the sun does find its way in. The MYOB in the most exposed parts of the garden have suffered .....
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.... but other more shady parts have been less badly affected.

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What is irritating is the neighbour's laurel has been shedding its leaves on to the line. During a running session, I can turn my back and another half dozen have deposited themselves on the track ....
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Gives a whole new concept to 'Leaves on the line'.....

Rik
 

Ralphmp

Registered
6 Jan 2010
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71
Herts
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I must admit to being a fan of MYOB - great ground cover. My garden is North facing and so often in the shade of the house from direct sunlight but, at this time of year, the sun does find its way in. The MYOB in the most exposed parts of the garden have suffered .....
View attachment 302015

.... but other more shady parts have been less badly affected.

View attachment 302016

What is irritating is the neighbour's laurel has been shedding its leaves on to the line. During a running session, I can turn my back and another half dozen have deposited themselves on the track ....
View attachment 302018

Gives a whole new concept to 'Leaves on the line'.....

Rik
I share your pain, Rik! Only the laurel in my case is in our own garden and on the “don’t you dare touch that” list!

My “neighbour shedding” issue is with their conifers which drop needles into points with such millimetric precision you’d think they were laser guided.
 

Revok

Registered
19 Jun 2018
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129
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West Sussex, UK
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I share your pain, Rik! Only the laurel in my case is in our own garden and on the “don’t you dare touch that” list!

My “neighbour shedding” issue is with their conifers which drop needles into points with such millimetric precision you’d think they were laser guided.

My track lies under the canopy of a huge chestnut tree. Its a truly majestic piece of nature, but jings does it drop loads of stuff over the year. Starts in July with loads of these catkins. To begin with its not much, and easily cleared, but for a period of about a week at its height its impossible to run anything as they drop constantly in even the slightest breeze, and any that lie across the track can cause derailment. Then in October the layout is bombarded with spiky chestnuts for a couple of weeks, nasty prickly things that need thick gardening gloves to deal with. That over, I get a few more weeks of mostly untroubled running until the late autumn leaf drop in November, which simply buries my track, and usually signifies the end of train playing until I start the tidy up in January and begin the cycle again.
Before I retired I used to get mildly peed off by having to keep clearing the track, but now, with more time and the pace of my life a lot slower, I find I quite enjoy the challenge of keeping trains running!

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