Workshop/shed build

PhilP

PhilP

G Scale, 7/8th's, Electronics
5 Jun 2013
23,888
621
Tamworth, Staffs.
In which case, it is my memory playing tricks on me! o_O:nod::nod:
;)
 
Chris Vernell

Chris Vernell

Winter is here
24 Oct 2009
4,526
350
73
Nepean, ON
Latest progress. At last, the roof has been finished and felted and the walls more or less clad. Now working on the interior.
View attachment 257989

It's been a bit of a challenge - not helped by the appalling weather over the past few weeks and raging toothache (another story!). However, it's beginning to take shape and I'm pleased with the way it's turning out.

Rik
A handsome abode
 
  • Like
Reactions: ge_rik
idlemarvel

idlemarvel

Registered
13 Jul 2015
1,799
156
Ascot
There's nothing quite like the feel of a new shed and the prospect of filling it...
 
  • Like
Reactions: ge_rik
dunnyrail

dunnyrail

DOGS, Garden Railways, Steam Trains, Jive Dancing,
25 Oct 2009
15,245
560
71
St.Neots Cambridgeshire UK
Latest progress. At last, the roof has been finished and felted and the walls more or less clad. Now working on the interior.
View attachment 257989

It's been a bit of a challenge - not helped by the appalling weather over the past few weeks and raging toothache (another story!). However, it's beginning to take shape and I'm pleased with the way it's turning out.

Rik
Nice Mancave Rik. Only thing I would have done differently would be to have either Tiled or put Metal Sheeting in the Roof as I have done. Replacing Felt after a life of around 5-10 years is a complete pain. My mate in Somerset already has had to replace his Felt roof as the original installation (badly done by suppliers of the Shed) was leaking over the first winter. Sure your fit will not have that issue.
 
ge_rik

ge_rik

British narrow gauge (esp. Southwold and W&LLR)
24 Oct 2009
9,651
220
Cheshire
www.riksrailway.blogspot.com
Nice Mancave Rik. Only thing I would have done differently would be to have either Tiled or put Metal Sheeting in the Roof as I have done. Replacing Felt after a life of around 5-10 years is a complete pain. My mate in Somerset already has had to replace his Felt roof as the original installation (badly done by suppliers of the Shed) was leaking over the first winter. Sure your fit will not have that issue.
I've invested in the really thick stuff builders use for flat roofs. It's guaranteed for 10 years. That's assuming it doesn't get punctured or torn by overhanging branches!

Rik
 
  • Like
Reactions: mike
ge_rik

ge_rik

British narrow gauge (esp. Southwold and W&LLR)
24 Oct 2009
9,651
220
Cheshire
www.riksrailway.blogspot.com
Now working on the interior..

.
The insulation I'm using is a sort of foamboard - foam between layers of foil. Not cheap but as my missus says, you're only going to do it once (unless of course I have a cunning plan!).

This is then clad with more OSB (Oriented Strand Board) - a cross between plywood and chipboard.

.
Have now finished doing the cladding so am installing the electrical fittings - sockets, switches, lighting etc.

Rik
 
  • Like
Reactions: mike
dunnyrail

dunnyrail

DOGS, Garden Railways, Steam Trains, Jive Dancing,
25 Oct 2009
15,245
560
71
St.Neots Cambridgeshire UK
Now working on the interior..

.
The insulation I'm using is a sort of foamboard - foam between layers of foil. Not cheap but as my missus says, you're only going to do it once (unless of course I have a cunning plan!).

This is then clad with more OSB (Oriented Strand Board) - a cross between plywood and chipboard.

.
Have now finished doing the cladding so am installing the electrical fittings - sockets, switches, lighting etc.

Rik
Do not forget to insulate the ceiling as well, but I guess that will be next.
 
voodoopenguin

voodoopenguin

Registered
20 Jul 2015
807
338
68
Blofield, Norfolk
Will you insulate the floor? That is often forgotten. My shed came with a thick plywood floor upon which I floated 25mm polystyrene sheets then the final floor was T&G chipboard flooring.

Paul
 
dunnyrail

dunnyrail

DOGS, Garden Railways, Steam Trains, Jive Dancing,
25 Oct 2009
15,245
560
71
St.Neots Cambridgeshire UK
Will you insulate the floor? That is often forgotten. My shed came with a thick plywood floor upon which I floated 25mm polystyrene sheets then the final floor was T&G chipboard flooring.

Paul
Yes Floor is also important. When I rebuilt my 2 Sheds into one the floors were not used somI put down Wicks 25mm Insulation with TnG as Paul did. Well worthwhile to keep the tootsies comfy in cold weather.
 
Madman

Madman

Registered
25 Oct 2009
13,190
237
Pennsylvania, USA
Now working on the interior..

.
The insulation I'm using is a sort of foamboard - foam between layers of foil. Not cheap but as my missus says, you're only going to do it once (unless of course I have a cunning plan!).

This is then clad with more OSB (Oriented Strand Board) - a cross between plywood and chipboard.

.
Have now finished doing the cladding so am installing the electrical fittings - sockets, switches, lighting etc.

Rik

Rik, your wiring will be right behind the OSB that you are installing. At least it appears to be in your photo. That would not pass code here. Is there any reason you didn't place it in the wall, i.e. drill the studs and pass the wiring through.
 
ge_rik

ge_rik

British narrow gauge (esp. Southwold and W&LLR)
24 Oct 2009
9,651
220
Cheshire
www.riksrailway.blogspot.com
Do not forget to insulate the ceiling as well, but I guess that will be next.
Yep. Ceiling now insulated. Just trying to decide which is the thinnest ply I can use - partly for weight an partly to make life easier when putting it up there.

Rik
 
ge_rik

ge_rik

British narrow gauge (esp. Southwold and W&LLR)
24 Oct 2009
9,651
220
Cheshire
www.riksrailway.blogspot.com
Rik, your wiring will be right behind the OSB that you are installing. At least it appears to be in your photo. That would not pass code here. Is there any reason you didn't place it in the wall, i.e. drill the studs and pass the wiring through.
Hi Dan
The wall studs are nominally 2" x 3" but seem to be nearer to 1.5" x 2.5" (or 38mm x 63.5mm). There's an air gap behind the insulation of around 10mm and the insulation is 50mm, so that leaves a just a few mm for the wiring on top of the insulation. I did wonder about putting the wiring behind the insulation in the air gap, but figured it would then have been a mare to modify in the future. I also wondered about using trunking on top of the OSB but felt that would look naff - and cost more - so this seemed like the best compromise.

I've now realised I should have been a lot more precise about positioning the cables. I managed to screw through a cable when fixing one of the pattresses in place because the cable had sagged a few mm. Fortunately, I've got plenty of photos of the installation process (I've been taking time lapse snaps every 60 seconds) and I've also got one of those wire detector gadgets so I'll try and be a lot more canny when fixing shelving etc in place.

Rik
 
  • Like
Reactions: mike
ge_rik

ge_rik

British narrow gauge (esp. Southwold and W&LLR)
24 Oct 2009
9,651
220
Cheshire
www.riksrailway.blogspot.com
Yes Floor is also important. When I rebuilt my 2 Sheds into one the floors were not used somI put down Wicks 25mm Insulation with TnG as Paul did. Well worthwhile to keep the tootsies comfy in cold weather.
Not got the clearance under the door for anything thicker than a carpet with underlay unfortunately.

I was giving my mate a lift home the other evening when we passed a skip outside a house which was being refurbed. Some rather nice looking rolls of carpet and underlay were on top. We managed to get a couple of rolls of carpet into the boot of the car plus a couple of bits of underlay. After tea, I nipped back to the skip to get another couple of rolls and more underlay but the skip had been taken away!!! Sod's Law! I've only got enough carpet for 2/3 of the floor.

However, yesterday, I was taking bits of the old shed to the recycling centre using the same mate's trailer and saw a chap in the next car was dumping some offcuts of new carpet. Not quite the same colour but near enough! One of the centre operatives was a bit sniffy about me transferring it from the back his car to my trailer but I explained the concept of recycling and re-using to him..... :think:

Off to tip again today with another trailer load - just hoping there's someone dumping decent carpet underlay there...... ;)

Rik
 
F

Fred Mills

Registered
27 Mar 2017
1,501
132
77
Ottawa/Nepean, Ontario Canada
Many "Do-it-yourself" electricians who do not know, or follow "Code", learn the hard way, and either hurt/electrocute themselves, or others, and often burn down "The barn" or run afoul of inspectors, or insurance people. From what I'm reading, and observing, although well-meaning, and trying to save a bit of money; this poor soul is not knowing, or following code, and should seek help immediately...
....or does anyone follow any "Electrical Code" over there ? After watching the building at Paul's display railroad, by the restaurant owners; I start to wonder about the basic BUILDING codes over there in GB....EGADS, seems that there aren't any, or North America is on another planet....but what do I know...:(
 
idlemarvel

idlemarvel

Registered
13 Jul 2015
1,799
156
Ascot
Too late for you now but I have 50mm insulation between the floor beams (50mm X 75mm) under the floorboards (22mm). It's held off the ground by plastic clips. The ground is well drained pea gravel held in place by plastic grids so no puddles underneath. When I moved the shed earlier this year it was still bone dry.
 
ge_rik

ge_rik

British narrow gauge (esp. Southwold and W&LLR)
24 Oct 2009
9,651
220
Cheshire
www.riksrailway.blogspot.com
Many "Do-it-yourself" electricians who do not know, or follow "Code", learn the hard way, and either hurt/electrocute themselves, or others, and often burn down "The barn" or run afoul of inspectors, or insurance people. From what I'm reading, and observing, although well-meaning, and trying to save a bit of money; this poor soul is not knowing, or following code, and should seek help immediately...
....or does anyone follow any "Electrical Code" over there ? After watching the building at Paul's display railroad, by the restaurant owners; I start to wonder about the basic BUILDING codes over there in GB....EGADS, seems that there aren't any, or North America is on another planet....but what do I know...:(
Thanks Fred
We have all sorts of codes dictating building standards and the installation of electrics etc over here. I've protected the electrics with an RCD unit (in fact two - one in the house and one in the workshop) and double checked that everything (including the foil insulation) is earthed. I recognise that placing the cabling immediately behind the OSB is not ideal, but it's a risk I'm willing to take.

Rik
 
Last edited:
JimmyB

JimmyB

Phase 1 complete, roll on Phase 2
23 Feb 2018
2,024
323
65
Weston-super-Mare
I think all Paul needs to 2worry" about is Part P Regulations for his wiring, the UK, Canada and USA have different Regulations (Codes) and some parts are more stringent than others across all three, and if I am not mistaken building codes even vary across the USA (State to State). though not 100% positive, for the UK the cable should have been pinned at a pre-defined distance. If Rik were to have the building inspector (not required for sheds - except Part P) he would have come at each stage.
 
  • Like
Reactions: ge_rik
Madman

Madman

Registered
25 Oct 2009
13,190
237
Pennsylvania, USA
Many "Do-it-yourself" electricians who do not know, or follow "Code", learn the hard way, and either hurt/electrocute themselves, or others, and often burn down "The barn" or run afoul of inspectors, or insurance people. From what I'm reading, and observing, although well-meaning, and trying to save a bit of money; this poor soul is not knowing, or following code, and should seek help immediately...
....or does anyone follow any "Electrical Code" over there ? After watching the building at Paul's display railroad, by the restaurant owners; I start to wonder about the basic BUILDING codes over there in GB....EGADS, seems that there aren't any, or North America is on another planet....but what do I know...:(
Fred, I believe Britain uses 220 Volt for their household power. I've had 110 volt bite me. 220 would not only bite but take a piece of me.....:mad:

Having vacationed in the UK, and observed a few things, it seems they stick to the rules more so than we do over here. But I worry about Rik's work. Although his explanation os as clear as mud, no criticism intended Rik, I am concerned about his method.
 
idlemarvel

idlemarvel

Registered
13 Jul 2015
1,799
156
Ascot
At the risk of stoking controversy, if you have an RCD or in your case two, you are protected from most electrical dangers, self inflicted or otherwise.

I have all my wiring visible in the inside, pinned appropriately and inside plastic conduits. Doesn't look as nice as hidden wiring but much easier to get to for repairs and alterations, and mine is a working shed, no pretensions to be a summer house or similar, so aesthetics come low down on the priority list.
 
dunnyrail

dunnyrail

DOGS, Garden Railways, Steam Trains, Jive Dancing,
25 Oct 2009
15,245
560
71
St.Neots Cambridgeshire UK
Hi Dan
The wall studs are nominally 2" x 3" but seem to be nearer to 1.5" x 2.5" (or 38mm x 63.5mm). There's an air gap behind the insulation of around 10mm and the insulation is 50mm, so that leaves a just a few mm for the wiring on top of the insulation. I did wonder about putting the wiring behind the insulation in the air gap, but figured it would then have been a mare to modify in the future. I also wondered about using trunking on top of the OSB but felt that would look naff - and cost more - so this seemed like the best compromise.

I've now realised I should have been a lot more precise about positioning the cables. I managed to screw through a cable when fixing one of the pattresses in place because the cable had sagged a few mm. Fortunately, I've got plenty of photos of the installation process (I've been taking time lapse snaps every 60 seconds) and I've also got one of those wire detector gadgets so I'll try and be a lot more canny when fixing shelving etc in place.

Rik
Whilst Trunking May look a little naff, the effect of being able to access the wiring for any future revisions mire more than compensates for the look. A good place to have put Trunking would have been on the Floor around the Edges, here it will mostly be lost by Furniture, Workbenches and the like. Getting up to Workbench Height with more Trunking in Corners works quite well.

My Trunking is at Roof Level mostly and behind Proscenium Arches for Lighting. Not very pretty I know but I tend not to notice it till I take a Picture. If I had Photoshop and knew how to use it I could manipulate my Pics to Show Sky instead!
135913_1ffb042eccec70c64070fbc1593e8096.jpeg
135914_de4398c2bfac0db0eed42095f6dd0994.jpeg