What Scale to Work in

Zerogee

Clencher's Bogleman
25 Oct 2009
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"G" is neither a scale nor a gauge.... it's more a state of mind! :D

Jon.
 
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DafyddElvy

1:22.5 Trams, NG Steam Railways
10 Feb 2021
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I have settled on modelling 1:22.5 scale myself, except for my Groudle Glen stock which is 7/8ths, oh and my Manx Northern Railway stock which is 15mm:ft scale :)

David
 

PhilP

G Scale, 7/8th's, Electronics
5 Jun 2013
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I think that I may have spotted a gap in the modelling market place:

I think I could actually develop and sell rubber-rulers! :wondering: :nerd: :nerd:
:rofl::rofl::rofl:

PhilP
 

DafyddElvy

1:22.5 Trams, NG Steam Railways
10 Feb 2021
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Yes I am still pondering things.

Any ideas why G Scale is generally regarded as being 1:22.5 scale when Gauge 3 works in 1:22.6 scale, or vice versa?


David
 

maxi-model

UK/US/ROW steam narrow gauge railways 1:1
27 Oct 2009
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As has been mentioned before G is not a scale, that terminology just confuses the issue. The adoption of 1:22.5 scale , aka IIm (the m suffix denoting metre gauge prototypes) is down to its closeness, at 44.444 mm to 1 m ÷ 22.5, to matching the commonly used 45 mm track gauge for model trains That, and LGB choosing it for their initial product offerings - then things got corrupted :D Gauge 3 is an extrapolation of standard gauge scaled at 1:22.6 running historically on 2.5" or 64 mm track gauge in the UK, i.e 56.5" ÷ 22.6 = 2.5", again another old historical modelling track guage. The common bit is the scale, everything else conforms to the type of prototype being modeled. I think. Bit like 15 mm scale being applied to 3 ft gauged prototypes and ending up being referred to as F(scale)n(narrow gauge)3(3' gauge). Have a look here IG Spur II Max

Edit - It's worth keeping in mind David that a lot of the modern day "scales" employed in the model railway hobby were created to make use of readily available available track gauges derived from their historically nominally associated scales - e.g. G3/64 mm/2.5" = 1.22.6(5), G1/45 mm = 1:32(10 mm), O/32 mm = 1:43"(1:48 US) OO/HO, 16.5 mm = 1:76 (1:87 EU/US) N/9 mm = 1:148.

From that base a whole host of sub scales have have been added and popularized by enterprising hobbyists and manufacturers to co-opt those gauges. Then you get to commercial considerations and the whole scale/gauge thing goes out the window. Examples - LGB's dictum that everything must go round an R1 curve, Aristo'/USAT "bigger is better" 1:29 (Piko 1:26 !) representation of std' gauge prototypes on 45 mm gauge, Bachmann's LS Thomas the Tank Engine range (No let's not go there :eek:) etc'etc'. And then there are even the purists that create a whole new track system so they can achieve their prototypical gauge/scale finescale ideal. It never ends.
 
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Wobbleboxer

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27 Oct 2009
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Am I right in saying that 'G' as the common denominator is more accurately the gauge and there are a multitude of uncommon scales that use it as their base?

In which case, can we rename the forum please? :rofl:
 

PhilP

G Scale, 7/8th's, Electronics
5 Jun 2013
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Tamworth, Staffs.
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I believe 'G' is gros (big)?
So 2.5" 64mm up to 15" must be bigger..
18" et Al, up to 4' 8.5" is narrow..
Anything above that is Broad..

So where does mortgage fit in?

:rofl::rofl::rofl:
 

dunnyrail

DOGS, Garden Railways, Steam Trains, Jive Dancing,
25 Oct 2009
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I believe 'G' is gros (big)?
So 2.5" 64mm up to 15" must be bigger..
18" et Al, up to 4' 8.5" is narrow..
Anything above that is Broad..

So where does mortgage fit in?

:rofl::rofl::rofl:
Have a friend that is more of a collector of 4mm than anything else, though used to have a layout when he was young. When we get chatting about scales, gauges and sizes of differing trains he sort of gets to going blub blub blub. It is all very complicated and one of those questions that is almost impossible to answer, though many of us have tried over the years. I pretty well understand it all as there are few gauges or scales that I have not dabbled in though there is a part of me that wished I had stuck with Irish NG at 15mm to the foot on 45 gauge track. Perfect scale gauge relationship with no worries about 1:whatever scale.
 

jimmielx

45mm gauge track - approx 16mm scale (1:19)
24 Oct 2009
763
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Hastings, UK
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United-Kingdom
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G Scales - plural, seems to make more sense to me. A wide variety of scales on G gauge 45mm track. And perhaps a broad church approach to the subject of scale should you wish to subscribe to that way of thinking.
 

DafyddElvy

1:22.5 Trams, NG Steam Railways
10 Feb 2021
297
31
West Lothian
Country
Scotland
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As has been mentioned before G is not a scale, that terminology just confuses the issue. The adoption of 1:22.5 scale , aka IIm (the m suffix denoting metre gauge prototypes) is down to its closeness, at 44.444 mm to 1 m ÷ 22.5, to matching the commonly used 45 mm track gauge for model trains That, and LGB choosing it for their initial product offerings - then things got corrupted :D Gauge 3 is an extrapolation of standard gauge scaled at 1:22.6 running historically on 2.5" or 64 mm track gauge in the UK, i.e 56.5" ÷ 22.6 = 2.5", again another old historical modelling track guage. The common bit is the scale, everything else conforms to the type of prototype being modeled. I think. Bit like 15 mm scale being applied to 3 ft gauged prototypes and ending up being referred to as F(scale)n(narrow gauge)3(3' gauge). Have a look here IG Spur II Max

Edit - It's worth keeping in mind David that a lot of the modern day "scales" employed in the model railway hobby were created to make use of readily available available track gauges derived from their historically nominally associated scales - e.g. G3/64 mm/2.5" = 1.22.6(5), G1/45 mm = 1:32(10 mm), O/32 mm = 1:43"(1:48 US) OO/HO, 16.5 mm = 1:76 (1:87 EU/US) N/9 mm = 1:148.

From that base a whole host of sub scales have have been added and popularized by enterprising hobbyists and manufacturers to co-opt those gauges. Then you get to commercial considerations and the whole scale/gauge thing goes out the window. Examples - LGB's dictum that everything must go round an R1 curve, Aristo'/USAT "bigger is better" 1:29 (Piko 1:26 !) representation of std' gauge prototypes on 45 mm gauge, Bachmann's LS Thomas the Tank Engine range (No let's not go there :eek:) etc'etc'. And then there are even the purists that create a whole new track system so they can achieve their prototypical gauge/scale finescale ideal. It never ends.
Apologies maxi-model, I have come from the world of 7mm scale modelling where things are much simpler, when I realised G Scale bachmann and lgb trams are generally considered to be 1:22.5 scale representing narrow gauge prototypes and then I started looking at some standard gauge prototypes and just shook my head when I realised the difference in adopted scales.

It was a little unfair I suppose to post my post, but it did give me some entertainment watching folk reply.

I shall try and behave a wee bit, but not too much, better ;-)

David
 

Gavin Sowry

Garden Railroader and Raconteur
27 Oct 2009
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Talking of scales is no more complicated than talking the English language.
Being understood, is, well, ...um, is as simple as understanding the English language.

We should have done it all in Latin. Afterall, this whole mess is the Romans fault, if weren't for their damned chariots, and the fat asses that towed them, we wouldn't be in this mess.
 

David1226

Registered
24 Oct 2009
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We should have done it all in Latin. Afterall, this whole mess is the Romans fault, if weren't for their damned chariots, and the fat asses that towed them, we wouldn't be in this mess.
I understand that the Romans did not believe in crystal balls..... they could never see any future in them.

David
 

JimmyB

Semi-Retired; more time for trains.
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It can't be that bad, we all understand it well enough
Speak for yourself, after 65+ years I was just starting to get to grips with, and now it's slipping away again ;)
 

maxi-model

UK/US/ROW steam narrow gauge railways 1:1
27 Oct 2009
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583
Bucks/Oxon/Northants area
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Apologies maxi-model, I have come from the world of 7mm scale modelling where things are much simpler, when I realised G Scale bachmann and lgb trams are generally considered to be 1:22.5 scale representing narrow gauge prototypes and then I started looking at some standard gauge prototypes and just shook my head when I realised the difference in adopted scales.

It was a little unfair I suppose to post my post, but it did give me some entertainment watching folk reply.

I shall try and behave a wee bit, but not too much, better ;-)

David
No problem David. I saw your post about the Blue Tram and the link, so I thought they might be related ;) Have you searched out the Blue Tram videos on YouTube ? Max
 

Gavin Sowry

Garden Railroader and Raconteur
27 Oct 2009
7,186
2,273
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Hutt Valley, NZ
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It can't be that bad, we all understand it well enough
I can understand beer o'clock, in any dialect of the English language, some other statements I just can't quite fathom.