What ‘scale’ is 1:22.5?

R

rusty spike

Registered
4 Aug 2019
11
1
UK
I have a mix of 1:20.3 and 1:22.5 US narrow gauge stock.
I believe the 1:20.3 comes in at 15mm/ft.
Maths isn’t my strong point and my friend Google hasn’t been of any help in determining what scale 1:22.5 is as per mm/ft.
I’m sure plenty of you will probably be throwing your arms up in disbelief of such a simple question, but I just can’t find the answer :sweating:
 
Doddy

Doddy

Registered
30 Aug 2011
86
3
Abingdon-upon-Thames
1 foot = 304.8 mm
304.8 mm / 22.5 =

13.55 mm to the foot @ 1:22.5
 
PhilP

PhilP

G Scale, 7/8th's, Electronics
5 Jun 2013
23,502
493
Tamworth, Staffs.
ARIA31

ARIA31

Registered
3 Oct 2017
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70
Toulouse - France
Allow me to join your question !

I see several times reference to 16 mm.
Should I understand it is 45 mm divided by the foot length in mm ?

At last I see many times the wheel diameter numbered 33 inch for example, how do, you connect to the model wheel diameter 31 mm or 35 mm or whatever ?

Thaank you to help both of us.... !!!!
 
R

rusty spike

Registered
4 Aug 2019
11
1
UK
1 foot = 304.8 mm
304.8 mm / 22.5 =

13.55 mm to the foot @ 1:22.5
Thanks Doddy....it always looks so much easier when someone else does the calculation!:blush:
 
R

rusty spike

Registered
4 Aug 2019
11
1
UK
Weeeelllllllllllllllllllllllll.............................................

1:22.5 IS the scale

SO, Gauge 3 (4' 81/2" standard gauge) and G scale (metre gauge European) are both the same 'scale-ratio' of 1:22.5.

But you knew that..

Does this help, at all?


PhilP.
Hi Philip,
Thanks for your reply.
I had stumbled across this table, but at the time it didn’t help. Now I see the formula for the calculation it has become clear. Now I need to decide what scale my little people should be. I’m guessing 1:22.5 on the station platform and mix and match on the locos and coaching stock.
 
Doddy

Doddy

Registered
30 Aug 2011
86
3
Abingdon-upon-Thames
SO, Gauge 3 (4' 81/2" standard gauge) and G scale (metre gauge European) are both the same 'scale-ratio' of 1:22.5.
NO! Try posting that on the Gauge 3 forum and you would be shot into burning flames as I found out myself.

Gauge 3 = 1:22.6 exact scale
 
Doddy

Doddy

Registered
30 Aug 2011
86
3
Abingdon-upon-Thames
Allow me to join your question !

I see several times reference to 16 mm.
Should I understand it is 45 mm divided by the foot length in mm ?

At last I see many times the wheel diameter numbered 33 inch for example, how do, you connect to the model wheel diameter 31 mm or 35 mm or whatever ?

16mm

1:19.05 Scale


Personally, I use Hollywood Foundrys Scalcalc App

131468_ebfe6566309c9d04afa88c8c79321f75.png
 
Last edited:
PhilP

PhilP

G Scale, 7/8th's, Electronics
5 Jun 2013
23,502
493
Tamworth, Staffs.
16mm to the foot

1 foot = 304.8 mm
304.8 mm / 16 =

19.05 mm to the foot
Errr...

1 foot divided by 16? - That is 1/16 scale or 19.05mm/foot

16mm/foot is 1:19.05 scale.
 
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maxi-model

maxi-model

UK/US/ROW steam narrow gauge railways 1:1
27 Oct 2009
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Bucks/Oxon/Northants area
And don't get us on about scale prototypical gauges being applied in 16 mm scale :D Or otherwise. Max
 
PhilP

PhilP

G Scale, 7/8th's, Electronics
5 Jun 2013
23,502
493
Tamworth, Staffs.
Rivets!

<INCOMING!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!>
:rofl::rofl::rofl:
 
Martino

Martino

Kit bashing, The UK narrow gauge, The GWR, Aviatio
Ah! LGB (plus Bachmann and the rest) have much to answer!

Scale is the ratio of the length in a drawing (or model) to the length on the real thing (Scale Definition (Illustrated Mathematics Dictionary)).

Gauge, in our terms, is the distance between the rails. The two things are not really linked.

As in real life (1:1) there are many gauges used by railways. You could for example decide to model in a scale of 15mm/1Ft and have standard gauge 4’ 8.5”, narrow gauge at 3’ or metre gauge, and narrow gauge at 2’ 11” or smaller and use different track gauges. You would use the scale to be common across all gauges so that your people (figures) would all be the same.

Regrettably terms like Gauge 3, Gauge 1, 0 gauge, 00 and H0 gauge all come along to confuse. The term G scale is even worse as it collects a whole heap of scales and gauges in a vast melting pot.

Confused? My two brain cells have melted.
 
Greg Elmassian

Greg Elmassian

Registered
8 Mar 2014
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171
San Diego
www.elmassian.com
Scale is scale, it's a ratio of the model to the real thing.

I think the question is better posed as "what scale / prototype" is represented by "xx mm/in" gauge...

or conversely given "xx mm/in" gauge, what scales are represented....

This is somewhat confused by "narrow gauge" and "standard gauge"...

So some people will ask: given 45mm track, what scales can be represented:
So 1:20.3 scale (us narrow gauge 3' gauge rolling stock) is represented by 45mm track
1:32 (us standard gauge 4' 8.5") is also represented by 45mm track

Or, given 1:22.5 scale, what prototype gauges / road types can be represented:
1 meter track in prototype on 45mm track (narrow gauge)
1 meter track on 64mm track (standard gauge)

So it's a combination of scale and gauge that maps to some prototype.
 
maxi-model

maxi-model

UK/US/ROW steam narrow gauge railways 1:1
27 Oct 2009
4,583
168
Bucks/Oxon/Northants area
The fun begins when some manufacturers, to garner the maximum sales for any given model of a "narrow gauge" prototype in a particular scale (mostly in 16 mm & 7/8th" scales), make the item available in both or readily re-gaugeable for use on either 32 mm and 45 mm gauged track systems.

This is a fairly common in practice in the UK market when producing narrow gauge items that mainly represent British and Colonial (read, "The old Empire") subjects. Why ? Here our modern garden rail hobby has its roots in both the 32 & 45 mm track gauges - respectively Gauges 0 & 1 to our standard gauge prototype fans. The manufacturers spotted that and thought, "Why not ?". So here we have a lot of 16 mm scale models, both prototypical and "freelance", that in real life, and imagination would have run on 2ft gauge tracks (32 mm scale representation) happily chugging around on 45 mm gauged set ups (you do the math).

There are many gauges in real life that count as narrow gauge - anything below 4'81/2" in fact. There are also a lot of arguments about this to be had with some purists ;) Max
 
PhilP

PhilP

G Scale, 7/8th's, Electronics
5 Jun 2013
23,502
493
Tamworth, Staffs.
Then you get 'standard gauge' loco's put on 'narrow gauge' bogies (trucks).. :devil::devil::devil:
 
P

Paul M

Registered
25 Oct 2016
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Royston
I think the 16mm SCALE 32/45 GAUGE came about because of the readily available LGB Track. A lot of garden railway folk started with an LGB starter set and evolved from there.
 
Eeyore.Boater

Eeyore.Boater

Registered
24 Oct 2009
58
6
Stafford
Hi Philip,
Thanks for your reply.
I had stumbled across this table, but at the time it didn’t help. Now I see the formula for the calculation it has become clear. Now I need to decide what scale my little people should be. I’m guessing 1:22.5 on the station platform and mix and match on the locos and coaching stock.
doesn’t matter too much as long as your little people are about as tall as the long edge of your credit card.
 
P

phils2um

Phil S
11 Sep 2015
335
114
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Remember too, people come in all sizes in the 1:1 scale ;););)
 
ntpntpntp

ntpntpntp

Registered
24 Oct 2009
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Who came up with this daft concept of representing a scale as a ratio with two different measurement systems mixing metric and imperial? I mean expressing a ratio in mm/foot - crazy :D I much prefer the simple clear ratio 1:22.5 or whatever.

I've noticed modellers also get confused by conventions used in other hobbies when considering what models might be useful. Eg. wargamers using the height of a generic person as their "scale", so you get railway modellers talking about N scale at 2mm/foot or just "2mm", whilst a wargamer would use "10mm" or "12mm" for a similar sized figure! Aaargh!