Transformer 4359

David Ayre

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25 Jan 2017
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Having just clumsily dropped this and bent the connectors I just had to take it apart and rebend them. It was a bit of a pain. But fixed and working fine again. However my 3 year old asked a question I couldn't answer, what are the second pair of connectors for? They seem to provide constant power to make the motor whir but not enough to move. I'm sure I'm missing something obvious.
 

PhilP

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Having just clumsily dropped this and bent the connectors I just had to take it apart and rebend them. It was a bit of a pain. But fixed and working fine again. However my 3 year old asked a question I couldn't answer, what are the second pair of connectors for? They seem to provide constant power to make the motor whir but not enough to move. I'm sure I'm missing something obvious.

This is not definitive to this particular transformer, but in general, most railway transformers have a second constant voltage output..
This can be used to fire point-motors, drive lighting etc.

'When I was a lad'... This was normally (well, often) an AC output.

HTH?
PhilP.
 

David Ayre

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I wondered if it was for this purpose. But why put this on a 'toy' controller? Walt or Jon, founts of all playmobil knowledge I guess you guys know the answer!
 

stockers

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They probably used existing components and they were just 'there'.
 

playmofire

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All the Playmobil transformers have two pairs of outlets. On the 4359 controller, the red and blue pair are for the track (max 16v) and the black and white pair for track side accessories, e.g. points, signals.

On the 4350 version, there are four sockets, the front pair for feeding the track and the side pair for accessories.

They also made an outdoor controller very similar to the LGB one, which took power from a transformer inside the house.
 

ntpntpntp

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I wondered if it was for this purpose. But why put this on a 'toy' controller? Walt or Jon, founts of all playmobil knowledge I guess you guys know the answer!

Why not? The Playmobil track powered railway range was no different to other train sets played with by kids, and as has been said the other terminals are 14V ac for points and signals etc. It's very clearly marked as such on the top of the controller with a picture of a point.

Transformator-Trafo-4359-Playmobil-Spur-G-Eisenbahn-Messing.jpg
 

playmofire

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I forgot to add in my previous post that as the track-powered Playmobil trains used LGB track and the main target market was Germany, it was good business practice to offer the same "off-line", as it were, faclilties as LGB.
 

James Day

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I guess the transformers had the auxilary outputs, because Playmobil didn't make them, but bought them in, badged up as a PM product. I guess they were a standard product? I seem to recall seeing the name Siemens on one type?

The basic UK supplied transformer went through at least two permutations and I know different transformers were provided for different markets, voltages, plug types.

That said PM never supplied anything to use the AC output for, although I use an early UK type PM transformer with miniature banana plug connections as my standard test transformer for G scale and HO. Both outputs get lots of use!

James
 

playmofire

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[QUOTE="James Day, post: 471785, member: 1859"
.

That said PM never supplied anything to use the AC output for, although I use an early UK type PM transformer with miniature banana plug connections as my standard test transformer for G scale and HO. Both outputs get lots of use!

James[/QUOTE]

I imagine that their view was that, particularly in Germany,, their main market, buyers of the Playmobil trains would turn to LGB for signals, point motors etc. In fact, there are quite a few videos on the internet which show just this, large layouts built around Playmobil trains but using LGB accessories.

(Vice versa, LGB in a mid-1980s edition of their Big Train book, recommend Playmobil buildings for use with LGB.)