Saturday 5th September 2020.

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Flying15

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12 May 2015
121
London
Blue?

I see dove grey.

Only the 1939 Royal Train was blue and stainless steel - Accucraft also make a model of that, too, and it is just soooooooooooooooooooooooo gorgeous.....
I just noticed that in your top photo the loco is set up for reversing - was this for a photo run-by?

View attachment 272664
Most observant !!!!
Well there were quite a few runbys so it probably was
We travelled a few hundred miles a day from Calgary to Vancouver
I had a habit of taking stills when The train was reversing and video the actual run past
I think “our Consist” may also have been setting back for the vintage diesel train (F7 leading) to take a particular track in the yard/station area and pass our train
I think it was hauling a bunch of CPR customers on a jolly
They had the heavyweight cars mainly
I wish we’d had longer in Vancouver to travel and see the Preserved Royal Hudson too
But work meant flying back to the UK
 
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Rhinochugger

Rhinochugger

Retired Oik
27 Oct 2009
28,118
North West Norfolk
Changing tack slightly (see what I did there? - Flying 15............ not not one of those ;) )

It's OK to talk about the cricket - can't say that I'm a fan of this 20 over stuff, but when it comes to beating the Aussies, then I'm interested.

Three match series - 2-0 up to England >:)>:)>:)>:)
 
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Madman

Madman

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25 Oct 2009
13,767
Pennsylvania, USA
Blue?

I see dove grey.

Only the 1939 Royal Train was blue and stainless steel - Accucraft also make a model of that, too, and it is just soooooooooooooooooooooooo gorgeous.....
I just noticed that in your top photo the loco is set up for reversing - was this for a photo run-by?

View attachment 272664

Please do tell. How were you able to determine the loco was set up to reverse ? As for the picture here of the 1939 royal train, the only thing spoiling the streamlined look is the heightened coal bunker on the tender. I my simple mind's eye, a call bunker higher than the loco cab looks awkward. Just an opinion.
 
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tac foley

tac foley

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11 Apr 2017
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Near Huntingdon, UK
Please do tell. How were you able to determine the loco was set up to reverse ? As for the picture here of the 1939 royal train, the only thing spoiling the streamlined look is the heightened coal bunker on the tender. I my simple mind's eye, a call bunker higher than the loco cab looks awkward. Just an opinion.
If you look at this photo, you'll see that the long valve rod at the top is in the horizontal or mid-gear, position - drop it right down = forwards, and raise it right up = reverse and it looking like the image underneath, of 'Tornado' which also has Walschaert valve gear.

1599482593956.png

1599481986644.png

As for your likes an dislikes vis-á-vis the appearance of the bunker, that's your own view. However, if you were hauling a 2000 ton train across a thousand miles of windy, tortuously bendy and hilly track with only a couple of coaling stations, unlike the USA where they were at every depot, then you'd want a nice big bunker.

Between Vancouver and Calgary I don't recall ANY coal bunkering facilities, but NP and GN had one at every major depot between Chicago and Spokane...CP doesn't/didn't have ANY major depots - except maybe Kamloops, between Calgary and Vancouver..

BTW, for anybody who might wonder where the 'royal; comes from, well, it's not just a name, it's an award of appreciation from the hand of King George VI himself - ' The King, somewhat of a rail buff, rode in the cab when possible. The King was so impressed with the performance of 2850 and her class, that after the tour, the King gave the CPR permission to use the term "Royal Hudson" for the semi-streamlined locomotives of the class (numbered 2820-2859, 2860-2864 were built one year later as Royal Hudsons) and to display Royal Crowns on the running board skirts. This was the first, and last time a locomotive outside of the United Kingdom was given royal status by the reigning monarch.
 
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tac foley

tac foley

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For anybody interested in how the Canadian Pacific RailWAY chose the magnificent maroon and grey colour scheme for certain of its locomotives - according to Mr Paul Bown of OVAR [thank you, Sir, and also to my good friend Fredk Mills Esq], the board was so impressed by the spiffy appearance of the LMS 'Royal Scot' locomotive and passenger coaches, on tour in North America after the 1933 Chicago World Fair, that they adopted the main colour, LMS maroon/AKA Crimson Lake, for their prestige locomotives. Many fine photographs of the Canadian tour can be found here - LMS 4-6-0 #6100 Royal Scot - Canada Tour

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Photograph courtesy of the Locoyard model collection.

i'm awaiting an email from Nepéan giving more details, should there be anybody here apart from me and Chris Vernell with an interest in this kind of thing.
 
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tac foley

tac foley

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..................and on the off-chance that anybody is interested, this is the Royal Hudson in BC Rail excursion livery, as preserved at Squamish BC - ah, right, it's in H0 scale.

1599913971310.png
 
The Devonian

The Devonian

Registered
17 Nov 2009
1,957
South Hams
Hello Tac,
I don't often look in here as I am not that focused on European models. But I found your CPR facts and Royal Husdon info most interesting. I guess many are not that familiar with Canadian railroads. Autumn/Fall will be soon with us so maybe I should look and see what CP and CN books I could get for the colder nights in front of the fire. ;)
I guess I could bend that ole fella 's ear in Nepean: he probably could write a few books.
* Ole fella? : he's younger than me!
 
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Paul M

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25 Oct 2016
5,247
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Royston
..................and on the off-chance that anybody is interested, this is the Royal Hudson in BC Rail excursion livery, as preserved at Squamish BC - ah, right, it's in H0 scale.

View attachment 273068
tac, it's a steam locomotive, we're interested
 
tac foley

tac foley

Registered
11 Apr 2017
2,904
74
Near Huntingdon, UK
Hello Tac,
I don't often look in here as I am not that focused on European models. But I found your CPR facts and Royal Husdon info most interesting. I guess many are not that familiar with Canadian railroads. Autumn/Fall will be soon with us so maybe I should look and see what CP and CN books I could get for the colder nights in front of the fire. ;)
I guess I could bend that ole fella 's ear in Nepean: he probably could write a few books.
* Ole fella? : he's younger than me!

Hello Alan - long time, eh? How's things down there by the railway? I've found over the years that the iggerunce about Canadian railways over here in UK is nothing less than astounding. The fact is stark and simple - without the East-west Canadian line, there would be no Canada as we know it. Soooooooooooooooooo, to find out all about it, read 'The Last Spike', by Pierre Berton. You can't hel[ but notice that the main cities across Canada 'hang off' the railroad lines like light bulbs off the ceiling, and the story of building across the Rockies is nothing less than amazing. There are dozens of videos and DVS's about the lines, especially in BC and Youtube is chock full of stuff, including many cab rides along the mighty river gorges, where the mountains on each side go straight up ten thousand feet or more.

The word spectacular doesn't even begin to describe it all.
 
The Devonian

The Devonian

Registered
17 Nov 2009
1,957
South Hams
Thanks Tac for the pointers. I will look that book up. Got lots on the US, Classic Trains are a great help. There is one issue that deals with the Royal Hudson, again I will look through the pile for it. Regards, to you and yours.

PS. Tac, I ordered the book last evening from AtoZ.
 
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