Railway or layout?

idlemarvel

idlemarvel

Registered
13 Jul 2015
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A train set is what you buy in a box, self contained with the track, loco, trucks, controller etc. Anyone can have one, the same one, identical. It becomes your railway when you add your own personal touches - passing loops, sidings, buildings, signals, loco detailing, sound cards, whatever interests you.
 
Chris Vernell

Chris Vernell

Bewildered
24 Oct 2009
4,045
167
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Nepean, ON
Fred has a mainline railroad with many stations and yards on which his crew operates multiple battery/rc trains as close to prototypically as makes no matter. Me, I have a much less ambitious, track-powered branchline oval (currently one station and a quarry siding) on which I enjoy watching one train at a time trundle around, but I can "operate" should I feel like it -- my current kit-building campaign is aimed at that.
We do both have (mostly) elevated roads -- it is easier on the back and less vulnerable to thundering hooves and frost heave.
 
korm kormsen

korm kormsen

Registered
24 Oct 2009
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16
...
I think there may be a different mental attitude as to what one is creating - a layout or a railway?
...
i think there are definitively very different attitudes. but that's, what we got rule eight for.

but there are a fair amount of outside factors for the different choices too.
- if it is too cold or too hot, where you live, you will try to stay inside.
- if you got a tiny house with a big(ger) garden, you will tend to go outside with your toys.
- if you are a prototype railway entusiast, you'll tend to build some kind of yard or an entire railroad line.
- if you need one hand for the smoke and the other for a drink, you might be inclined to have a roundy-round.
- if you are an engineer, you might have the perfect DCC and smoke as well as sound, while your track goes from backside alley to thrashcan bend.
- if you are a tinkerer, you might have the perfect modeled cars, ... on a carpet-express line. or wonderfull buildings around a toy-train line.
- if you are a colector, you might have 27 locos, ... and only five cars and a R1 circle.

for me that's ok. the only people that disturb me, are those, that tell me, that my way is wrong.
as rule 8 tells me, that i'm "working" (after 40 years of largescaling) on my fourth or fifth unfinished layout is perfectly right - for me.
 
P

Paul M

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25 Oct 2016
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Isn't it actually a vital part of any REAL gardeners' ambition?
 
idlemarvel

idlemarvel

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13 Jul 2015
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Who said "it's not a garden without a railway"? I've seen it printed on t-shirts so it must be true.
 
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Gavin Sowry

Gavin Sowry

Garden Railroader and Raconteur
27 Oct 2009
6,009
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Hutt Valley, NZ
This story book lead me to leaving my American Flyer (S Gauge) locomotive, cars and track outside in the dirt. Layout or Railroad, I'm fulfilling a deep seated need... prescribed by my psychiatrist. ;)
View attachment 251048
You can call the ailment anything you like, but give me that cure any day.
When I was a kid, there used to be a book in the local library called Choo Choo. Well, it was in the library when we didn't have it checked out. I found a (reprint) copy at a museum in the States, mint condition,
 
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KentKeith

KentKeith

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24 Oct 2009
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SouthEast Kent
As far as I'm concerned the EG&SNNR (the Ever Growing and Still No Name Railway) in the garden is a "railway". What I've got indoors in HO/OO is a layout.

Its interesting that most of the people who see the EG&SNNR for the first time always call it a railway, nobody has referred to it as a layout. I automatically call it the railway. My brother's grandsons just ask to see the trains indoors or out!!

Personally I derive as much enjoyment working on the railway as I do running trains. When I am running trains I'm always thinking what else I can do to the railway.
 
korm kormsen

korm kormsen

Registered
24 Oct 2009
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Gentlemen, thanks for all the positive feedback.

Greg, yes, i was thinking about a pic of just that spot, when i tried to point out some of all the different ways to enjoy our hobby.
 
Martino

Martino

Kit bashing, The UK narrow gauge, The GWR, Aviatio
Interesting replies everyone. Thank you.

As a kid, my father made me an 00 layout. He plans to build it into a much bigger model railway. Of course this would have been indoors and have artificial scenery etc. I continued with building models - locos and stock (kits and repainting and detailing RTR stuff) with the intention of building a model of a steam/diesel transition era engine shed. Of course it never happened.

My interest in real railways was all about watching the end of steam on the WR of BR in the mid 60s and the late 60s of thundering Westerns, Warships, Hymeks and Brush 4s. Later it developed into wandering closed branch lines and investigating the old Slough Trading Estate Railway. I think it’s the later that led me to large scale garden railways.

I like the sight of a line wandering off into the countryside/shrubbery and wondering “Where does that go?” “What was that like when trains ran?”.

So, my railway wombles around the garden, in and out of view. I get more enjoyment out of just looking at the line than I do running trains.

It is a railway , built at ground level, using nature as a 1:1 railway would.

I’m in the ‘Railway in a garden’ camp.
 
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Revok

Revok

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19 Jun 2018
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I get more enjoyment out of just looking at the line than I do running trains.
I get exactly what you mean I think.... this just about sums up what I'm trying to achieve with my railway. I'd say I get *as much* enjoyment rather than more, but certainly there is many a time I just look at the track and how it runs through the rocks and plants and enjoy the view, without the necessity of a train trundling along.

I don't think I have ever troubled myself over defining what it is, I've always just thought of it as simply a model railway in the garden, a feature just like a pond or a flower bed. Only more expensive!
 
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David1226

David1226

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24 Oct 2009
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Abingdon, Oxfordshire
As already alluded to in post #8, although, as yet I have no track screwed to baseboards, in my head my 'layout' is very much a real railway to me. As such it has a raison d'être, a history and a corporate livery.

Although I have posted the history before, I will do so again for the information of newer forum members who my not be aware of the importance of the line in the development of preserved narrow gauge railways in the UK.

121411_54124a49cbd4b36f5e9c4d0697b9410b.jpg


The History of the Claptowte Railway

Gernise End
depicts the rural terminus of the Claptowte Railway, a British narrow gauge line, set somewhere in the English - Welsh border country, sometime around the last half of the 20th century. The line meanders through the Vale of Claptowte from Gernise End to an exchange with a main line standard gauge railway at Ellceware. The Motive Power Depot, workshop facilities and carriage sidings are located along the line at Phidell Yard. From Phidell Yard, another short line branches off to the larger community of Welwawn, thus the line is often incorrectly referred to as the Welwawn and Claptowte Railway, or, The Old W.C.

In order to avoid the considerable Civil Engineering costs, and difficulties, that would have been required to push a standard gauge railway through the undulating and twisting topography of the vale, the founding fathers of the line elected to construct a narrow gauge railway that would follow the contours of the vale, rather than combat them. They sought out and engaged an acknowledged narrow gauge expert of the day, Ivor Biggedd, to be the company’s first Chief Mechanical Engineer. Prior to taking up this appointment, Biggedd had undertaken an extensive tour of Europe in order to study Continental railway practices. He was deeply impressed by the ride quality and generous loading gauge of European metre gauge (3’ 3’’) railways when compared to the almost universal two foot gauge (60cm) and restricted clearances of most British narrow gauge lines. He attributed this to the fact that most British narrow gauge lines had evolved from industrial horse-drawn tramways. Given a blank piece of paper Biggedd proposed, from the outset, to construct a metre gauge railway. His many close links with various European railway companies and manufacturers meant that he was able to purchase continental locomotives and stock at very advantageous prices, a factor that greatly endeared him to the Board of Directors, under the Chairmanship of Sir Nial DeMencha.

The European links have been maintained with the more recent introductions of diesel power. Over the years, a succession of rebuilds and modifications, in the company’s own workshop, has greatly altered the appearance of much of the stock from its European origins. This, together with its metre gauge, has given the Claptowte Railway its unique character.

The first arrival of the day, at Gernise End, brings newspapers, parcels and mail, while the first departure still collects milk, in churns, from the stops along the way, for delivery to the dairy at Ellceware. Livestock, poultry, vegetables and other local produce are transported to and from the weekly market at Welwawn. Coal and coke are delivered to the fires and cooking ranges of Gernise End where the tentacles of the gas main have yet to reach. The few narrow, winding roads of the vale, hemmed in by high dry stone walls, have kept motor transport to a minimum and the railway is still the prime mover of freight and passengers, in the area.

Since the dawn of the Industrial Revolution, a number of small independent engineering machine shops, dotted about the vale, have specialised in, and become renowned for, the manufacture of watnaims, in fact, Claptowte watnaims are known to Mechanical Engineers all over the world. There cannot be many engineering installations around the former British Empire not fitted with a Claptowte watnaim. This local industry keeps the goods yard at Gernise End, known as Goudes Sidings, busy handling the influx of the necessary raw materials and coping with the demands of the export trade, especially for spare parts.

The principle shareholder of the line is also the largest landowner in the area, Lord Ellpasse. The Ellpasse Estates cover large swaithes of the vale, including the extensive grouse moors above Gernies End. Lord Ellpasse welcomed the building of the railway as a means of conveniently and comfortably bringing paying guests to his shooting parties on the moors. Estate workers are sent, in the shooting brake, to meet and greet the guests at the station. They can frequently be heard roaming the platform calling out their employer’s name, Lord Ellpasse. These cries often bring the local vicar, Rev W.Awdry, who has himself more than a passing interest in railways, running to see what is amiss.

The end of post World War II austerity has seen a gradual return to the area of Homo Touristus. They are returning in ever increasing numbers, armed with a Thermos flask and an illustrated copy of A.Wainwright’sWalking the Claptowte Way’, to explore the beautiful countryside around the vale. Another attraction, for many, is the locally brewed ale, which is savoured by many who end up spending time on The Old W.C.

The rapid demise of steam locomotion on national standard gauge services is leading to a growing interest, by enthusiasts, in preserving independent steam operated railways. All of the above factors means that passenger schedules are well patronised, whatever the time of year, and the line’s future seems assured.

And yes . . . if you have not already worked it out, Gernise End is pronounced Journey’s End. What better name for both a terminus and the culmination of a lifetime of modelling?

David Goldsworthy
Chief Mechanical Engineer
The Claptowte Railway


The Claptowte Railway Freight Roster

121409_4b68e06ea055e0f1f84116f5e03d8dab.jpg



Some of the yet to be completed Claptowte Railway Passenger fleet

121413_f7f190b6f7f7cc6abb5c2eaff0ccb336.jpg


David
 
Last edited:
kim

kim

retired at last
27 Apr 2015
687
59
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Blackpoo
Mine is a mix of both, the right hand side of my garden is my 'base board' and it usually gets changed every year or two. The rest is a railway in a garden that hasn't really changed for years except for the addition of a fence hugging circuit that will not change.
 
P

Paul M

Registered
25 Oct 2016
2,792
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Royston
I get exactly what you mean I think.... this just about sums up what I'm trying to achieve with my railway. I'd say I get *as much* enjoyment rather than more, but certainly there is many a time I just look at the track and how it runs through the rocks and plants and enjoy the view, without the necessity of a train trundling along.

I don't think I have ever troubled myself over defining what it is, I've always just thought of it as simply a model railway in the garden, a feature just like a pond or a flower bed. Only more expensive!
Interesting concept. Has anyone built a disused line? All track in-situ, abandoned stations etc? Obviously no trains running just trackers.
 
PhilP

PhilP

G Scale, 7/8th's, Electronics
5 Jun 2013
22,782
274
Tamworth, Staffs.
And yes . . . if you have not already worked it out, Gernise End is pronounced Journey’s End. What better name for both a terminus and the culmination of a lifetime of modelling?

David Goldsworthy
Chief Mechanical Engineer
The Claptowte Railway
Knowing how long it takes most preserved lines to get anything done...
You have (hopefully) a long-time, to reach 'Gernaise End' David. :):clap::nod::nod: